ACAD 08-006 Crosswalk with CRC identified NUCP Material

This comprehensive crosswalk links the objectives of ACAD 08-006 with GP Strategies ABC Material,
NUCP Surveyed Material, NANTeL resources, EPRI resources, web resources, and published material
available to all RCNET partners. Each field links to teaching materials that can be downloaded for use
in your classroom.

 

Non-Licensed Operators

Radiological Protection Technicians

Chemistry Technicians

Maintenance Personnel

 

 

Core Curriculum

ACADsGP Strategies Matrix Lesson Chapter - ObjectivesGAP Materials from RCNET &
Academic Partners
Textbook & Other Published
Materials
Web - based Resources
1.1 Fundamentals
1.1.1 MATHEMATICS Explain and use mathematical concepts, scientific notation, dimensional analysis, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, graphs, and control charts, with an understanding of basic statistics (that is, application of statistical concepts but not formula development.)
1.1.1.1 Perform basic arithmetic functions including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division; fractions and decimals; percentages; square roots; and ratios.MA-01-1, 2, 3
MA-02-1, 2, 3, 4, 5
MA-03-1, 2, 3, 6
MA-04, 1
MA-05-1, 2, 3, 4  
1.1.1.2 Perform basic statistical analysis, including mean, mode, standard deviation, median, percent error, confidence level, precision and accuracy, and distribution functions. Interpret the results.PPTData Analysis in Excel

PPTStatistics: Dealing with Uncertainty

PPTDetector Efficiency

PPTCounting Statistics

DOC Counting Statistics Instructor Notes
Sampling Distribution of the Mean tutorial

Mathlets: applets for Math
1.1.1.3 Perform basic calculations that involve significant figures including measurementMA-03-6  
1.1.1.4 Perform calculations that involve logarithms/exponential functions, including graphing, solving for the exponent, solving for any variable, base e and base 10.MA-04-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
MA-04-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
MA-11-1, 2, 3, 4  
PPTData Analysis in Excel


PPTStatistics: Dealing with Uncertainty
Mathlets: applets for Math
1.1.1.5 Apply scientific and engineering notation in calculations including conversion of numbersMA-11-5, 6, 7, 8
MA-11-6, 7  
1.1.1.6 Demonstrate the ability to apply the concept of dimensional analysis and to perform unit conversions, unit modifiers, and metric measurements such as conversion between metric and the U.S. customary system.PH-01-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13
PH-01-2  
1.1.1.7 Perform basic algebraic operations, including calculations of area and volume. NOTE: Geometry concepts of area and volume are now included in the algebra statement.MA-05-1, 2, 3, 4
MA-06-1, 2, 3
MA-08-1, 2
MA-09-1, 2, 3
MA-10-1, 2, 3, 4
MA-13-1, 2, 4
MA-14-1, 2, 3, 4  
Virtual Manipulatives for Algebra
1.1.1.8 Perform basic trigonometric operations such as simple right triangle calculations of sine, cosine, and tangent.MA-12-1
MA-13-1, 2, 3, 4, 5
MA-14-1, 2, 3, 4
MA-15- 1, 2, 3, 5
MA-16- 1
PH-01-8  
1.1.1.9 Create and interpret graphs and control charts, including graphing data, obtaining information from graphs and control charts and nomograms, rectangular coordinate systems, and logarithmic coordinate systems.MA-12-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  PPTReactor Regulating Systems


Virtual Manipulatives for Algebra
1.1.2 PHYSICS Explain and use physics terms, units, mechanical principles, simple machines, deinitions, and basic concepts.
1.1.2.1 Develop an understanding of Systems International (SI) and English units, including measuring pressure, temperature, flow, volume, mass, weight, distance, and time.PH-01- 1,2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10,11,12,13
HT-01-1,2,3 HT-04-1
MA-14-1  
PPTMeasuring Flow

PPTMeasuring Pressure

PPTMeasuring Level

PPTMeasuring Temperature

PPT Measurement System
1.1.2.2 Perform basic calculations and apply concepts for the following:
1.1.2.2.1 density, height and temperature effects on process fluids, mass, fluid mechanics, weight and heatPH-01- 1,2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10
PH-03- 5
PH-04- 2
IC-03-5 IC-04-3, 4, 5
IC-05-3
HT-01-1, 5, 6, 9, 10
HT-02-8 HT-03-4
HT-04-1, 2, 3, 4, 6
MA-14-3, 4  
1.1.2.2.2 temperature system conversions such as Rankine, Fahrenheit, Kelvin, CelsiusHT- 01- 1
PH-01-11
IC-02-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14  
1.1.2.2.3 temperature measuring systemsHT-01- 1, 2,
IC-02-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14  
1.1.2.3 Perform basic calculations and apply concepts for acceleration, distance and velocityPH-01-8
PH-02-1, 2
PH-03-1, 5
PH- 4- 2, 4, 5  
1.1.2.4 Perform basic calculations and apply concepts for the following:
1.1.2.4.1 energyPH-01-14
PH-06- 1, 2, 3, 4  
1.1.2.4.2 forcePH-03- 1
PH-04- 2
PH-05-1, 2  
1.1.2.4.3 momentumPH-04-1, 2, 3, 4  
1.1.2.4.4 powerPH-07- 1, 2  Power in Electric Circuits in All About Circuits
1.1.2.4.5 workPH-05- 1, 2  Power in Electric Circuits in All About Circuits
1.1.2.5 Explain the principles of mechanical concepts, including the following:
1.1.2.5.1 purposes and necessity of lubrication principles (such as coefficient of friction, viscosity, heat dissipation)ME-09-1, 2, 3, 4, 19, 20  
1.1.2.5.2 mechanical principles (such as simple machines, including functions of individual components such as levers, gears, cams, and pulleys)PPTSimple Machines
1.1.3 ELECTRICAL SCIENCES
1.1.3.1 Apply direct current (DC) concepts and laws; perform calculations and measurements including the following:
1.1.3.1.1 basic electrical circuits such as series and parallel, series-parallel combinationsES-03-6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 ES-04- 2, 4  
1.1.3.1.2 conductors and insulatorsES-04- 2  
1.1.3.1.3 direct current (DC) theory and DC sources (such as ideal voltage and current, non-ideal voltage and current)ES-03- 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9 10,  
1.1.3.1.5 electron theoryES-01-1  
1.1.3.1.6 units of electrical measurement (such as ohms, volts, amps, watts, coulombs, joules)ES-01- 1, 2. 3. 4  
1.1.3.1.7 voltage, current, resistance and powerPH 7-2  
1.1.3.2 Apply alternating current (AC) concepts and laws and perform calculations and measurements including the following:
1.1.3.2.1 alternating current (AC) theory and AC sources (such as ideal voltage and current, non-ideal voltage and current)ES-03- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  
1.1.3.2.2 basic electrical circuits such as series and parallelES-03-4,5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14  
1.1.3.2.3 units of electrical measurement (such as henries, farads, reactance, impedance)ES-03- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  
1.1.3.2.4 passive components, capacitors, inductorsES-03- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  
1.1.3.2.5 single-phase versus three-phaseES-03- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  
1.1.3.2.6 voltage, current, impedance, real, reactive, apparent power and power factor relationshipsPH 7-2
ES-03- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  
1.1.3.3 Explain basic electronic theory, including semiconductors, diodes, and transistors. NOTE: This section of National Academy ACAD documents is out of date and does not reflect current technology; it is considered plant specific.
1.1.4 BASIC ATOMIC AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS Explain and apply basic concepts associated with atomic structure, nuclear interactions and reactions, fission process, and reactor operation.
1.1.4.1 Explain basic atomic structure, including atomic mass unit, protons, neutrons, electrons, isotopes, mass-energy equivalence, mass defect, binding energy, and binding energy per nucleon.NS-01-1, 2, 3, 4, 5
NS-02-1, 2, 3, 7, 8
NS-04-2  
PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.4.2 Explain basic nuclear interactions and reactions, including radioactive decay processes (alpha, beta, gamma, electron capture), (content added: neutron activation), half-life determination, isotope identification methods, ionization (Bremsstrahlung, ionization and excitation), radiation interactions with matter (pair production, Compton scattering, photo-electrical effect), and neutron interactions (elastic and inelastic scattering, charged particle emission, fission, radioactive capture).ES-01- 1
NS-01-1, 2, 3, 4, 5
NS-02- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
NS-03-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
NS-04-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8
NS-05-1, 2, 3, 5
NS-08-1  
PPTRadioactive Decay

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTRadiaton Detection Principles and Instruments_Instructor Notes


PPTInteractions with Matter

1.1.4.3 Explain the basic fission process, including the theory of fission process (delayed and prompt neutrons, thermal and fast neutrons), control of fission process, neutron flux effects on reactor power, neutron leakage, fission products, neutron sources, and radiation from fission and from fission products.PH 7-2
NS-01- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
NS-02- 1, 2, 3
NS-03- 2, 7
NS-4- 3, 4, 5, 6
NS-5- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
NS-06- 1, 2, 5  
PPTInteractions with Matter
1.1.4.4. Explain residual heat/decay heat, including the sources of decay heat (describe sources of decay and residual heat and its significance).NS-04-6, 7, 8, 9, 10
NS-5- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
NS-8- 7, 8  
1.1.4.5 Explain, identify and quantify major sources of natural background radiation, man-made sources of background radiation, and radioactive sources routinely found in a nuclear plant (such as cobalt-60, cobalt-58, cesium-137, cesium-134, iodine-131, xenon-133, iridium-192)PPTBackground Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTChemistry and Radcon

1.1.4.6 Explain basic reactor operation, to include basic reactor types, reactor parameters, reactivity (including reactivity coefficients: temperature, void, fuel (Doppler)), response to control rods/boron/fission product poisons, reactor startup and shutdown, reactivity events, general design overview of the station reactor type(s), basic reactor core parameters, and reactivity control methods.NS-05- 4, 5
NS-06-3, 4, 6, 7, 8
NS-07-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 11, 12
NS-08-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  
PPTResidual Heat & Reactor Operation

PPTPlant Status

PPTOverview of Nuclear Plant Systems

PPT History of Nuclear Technology Reactor Design

PPTReactor Regulating Systems

.rtfReactor Coolant System Lesson Plan


PPTReactor Coolant System Instructor Notes

1.1.5 HEAT TRANSFER AND FLUID FLOW heat transfer, and principles of fluid flow.
1.1.5.1 Explain principles and concepts related to heat including the following:
1.1.5.1.1 heat transfer mechanisms and heat exchanger construction and typesHT-02- 3, 4, 5, 6
MS-03- 1, 3, 4  
1.1.5.1.2 temperature including temperature scales, F, C and K (such as kinetic theory of gases)HT-01- 1, 2,
PH-01-8, 10  
1.1.5.2 Explain the concepts and principles of steam including the following:
1.1.5.2.1 basic steam-water cycleHT- 03- 4  
1.1.5.2.2 boiling and saturationHT- 02- 6, 7  
1.1.5.2.3 pressure-temperature relationshipHT-010 3 HT-03- 2  PPTMeasuring Pressure
1.1.5.2.4 properties of steam and water including pressure-temperature relationship, basic steam-water cycle, steam tables, boiling, saturation, temperature/pressure and thermal efficiency.HT-01-1, 2
HT-02-2, 6, 7
HT-03- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  
1.1.5.2.5 steam tablesHT- 03- 6  
1.1.5.3 Explain the principles of heat transfer including the following:
1.1.5.3.1 heat transfer mechanisms such as conduction, convection and radiationHT-02-3, 4, 5, 6  
1.1.5.3.2 heat exchangersIC-03-5
IC-04-3, 4, 5
IC-05-3  
1.1.5.3.3 latent and sensible heatHT-03-1
HT-02-2, 3, 5  
1.1.5.3.4 thermal efficiencyHT-03-5  
1.1.5.4 Explain principles of fluid flow including the following:
1.1.5.4.1 effects of throttling on flow and pressureHT-04- 5  
1.1.5.4.2 filling and venting - understanding the concept of high point vents relating to air binding and water hammerHT-04- 10  
1.1.5.4.3 fluid properties and mechanics including laminar and turbulent flowHT-01- 5, 6, 7, 8, 10
HT-02-8 HT-03-4
HT-04- 1, 2, 3, 4, 6  
1.1.5.4.4 flow within a closed system to include water hammer, heating, draining, filling and venting and the effects of throttlingHT-04-3, 4, 5, 6, 10  DOCExtraction Steam and Heater Drain Lesson Plan

DOCExtraction Steam and Heater Drain Instructor Notes

1.1.5.4.5 pump theory including cavitationME-02- 2, 11, 12  
1.1.5.4.6 water hammer types and mechanismsHT-04-7, 8, 9, 10 ME-02-19  
1.1.6 CHEMISTRY fundamentals, including water chemistry control and reactor water chemistry.
1.1.6.1 Explain and apply the basic fundamentals of chemistry including the following:
1.1.6.1.1 acids and basesCH-03-1, 2  PPTPlant Chemistry Overview


1.1.6.1.2 conductivityCH-05-5 CH-06-2 IC-08-1  
1.1.6.1.3 ion exchangersCH-04-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19  DOCFuel Pool Cooling and Cleanup System Instructor Notes
1.1.6.1.4 mixtures, solutions, and compoundsCH-01-5 CH-02-9  PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.6.1.5 moleculesCH-01-3  PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.6.1.6 Periodic TableCH-01-10, 11, 12, 13  PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.6.1.7 pHCH-03-3, 4, 5, 6  PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.6.1.8 properties and uses of gasesCH-07-7, 8, 9, 11
HT-01-8, 10  
1.1.6.1.9 states of matterCH-01-4  
1.1.6.1.10 units of measureCH-02-9  
1.1.6.2 Explain and apply basic water chemistry control fundamentals including the following:
1.1.6.2.1 effects of impurities (such as increased corrosion rates, reduction in heat transfer area, tube failure in steam generators)CH-01-5 CH-02-9  PPT Cooling Towers and Air Cooled Condensers

PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.6.2.2 ion exchange theory (such as discussion on anion and cation resin and mixed bed resin; discussions on channeling, break-through and resin bed exhaustion and observation of decontamination factor)CH-04-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19  PPT Primary Water Chemistry


PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.6.2.3 parameters monitored (such as pH, conductivity, sodium, chlorides, fluorides, sulfates, hardness, silica)CH-01-5
CH-02-9
CH-05- 5
CH-06- 2  
1.1.6.2.4 principles of water treatment (such as water purification with filters/reverse osmosisCH-04-8, 9, 10  PPTWater Treatment

PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.6.2.5 sources of impurities (such as tube leaks in heat exchangers/condensers)CH-04-1, 2, 14, 18  PPT Cooling Towers and Air Cooled Condensers

PPTPlant Chemistry Overview

PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.6.2.6 the corrosion process including types characteristics and preventionCH-06-1, 2, 3, 5, 12, 16, 17, 18, 19
CH-07-7, 8, 9, 11  
PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.6.2.7 water chemistry control methods (such as ion exchange, O2 control with chemistry (hydrazine) or gas (N2), pH control (amines))CH-04-5, 7, 10  PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.6.3 Explain and apply reactor water chemistry fundamentals including the following:
1.1.6.3.1 analytical results and core conditions (plant specific)PPTPrimary Water Chemistry

1.1.6.3.2 control/removal of impurities (such as demineralization, chemical addition, hydrogen addition, hydrazine, degassing)CH-04- 3, 4, 5, 7, 10 IC-05-3  PPTPrimary Water Chemistry
PPTPlant Chemistry Overview

PPTWater Treatment
1.1.6.3.3 effects of impurities (such as an increase in corrosion rates, total gases, local radiation levels)CH-04-1, 2, 14, 18  PPTPrimary Water Chemistry

PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.6.3.4 hydrogen gas in reactor water (such as for use of O2 control)IC-03-5  PPTPrimary Water Chemistry

1.1.6.3.5 radioalysis and recombination (such as water/ammonia and the effects on pH)CH-05-1  
1.1.6.3.6 radiochemistry (such as causes of an indications of crud burst and/or fuel failure, ion exchange exhaustion sampling methods (plant specific)
1.1.6.3.7 sources of impurities (such as air intrusion, ion exchanger exhaustion)CH-01-5
CH-02-9
CH-04-1, 2, 14, 18
CH-04-5, 7, 10
CH-05-5  
PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
1.1.6.3.8 types of impurities (such as chlorides, fluorides, O2 and H2)CH-01-5
CH-02-9
CH-04-1, 2, 5, 7, 10, 14, 18
CH-05-5  
PPTPrimary Water Chemistry
1.1.7 PROPERTIES OF REACTOR PLANT MATERIALS Explain the basic concepts of the properties of metals and alloys; the strength of materials; brittle fracture; plant material problems; thermal shock stress; erosion, corrosion, and control.
1.1.7.1 Explain basic material properties including:
1.1.7.1.1 alloy definition and applicationCH-06-1, 3, 8
MS-01-10, 12, 13
MS-02-1, 11, 14, 22, 23
MS-04-4  
PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.1.2 compressive strengthMS-02- 2, 3  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.1.3 expansion/contraction associated with temperature changesMS-02- 16 MS-05- 3, 4  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.1.4 heat treating and annealing related to the properties of metalsMS-02- 18 CH-02-20, 21  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.1.5 radiation-induced embrittlement by neutron exposureMS-03-7, 8  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.1.6 material strengthMS-02-11, 14  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.1.7 structure basics and changes in structure (overview of general metals properties, not a discussion of crystalline structure)MS-01- 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10
MS-02- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  
1.1.7.1.8 torque limitsMS-02- 11, 12, 13, 14  
1.1.7.1.9 yield and tensile strengthMS-02- 3, 11  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.2 Explain brittle fracture characteristics, mechanisms and temperature effects such as heatup and cool downMS-03-7, 8
MS-04- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
MS-05- 1, 2, 5, 6, 7  
PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.3 Explain plant material problems, including the following:MS-03-7, 8  
1.1.7.3.1 corrosion - types including general and specific
1.1.7.3.1.f -- microbiologically-induced corrosion (open system sources such as marine growth)HT-05-4  
1.1.7.3.1a -- pit and creviceCH-06-18, 19 MS-02-16  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.3.1b -- galvanicCH-06-17 MS-02-16  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.3.1c -- chloride stressCH-06-18 MS-02-16  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.3.1d -- caustic stressCH-06-18 MS-02-16  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.3.1e -- stress corrosion cracking, including intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC)CH-06-3, 18, 19  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.3.2 effects of contaminants on corrosion and material propertiesCH-06-1, 2, 3, 5, 12, 16, 17, 18, 19  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.3.3 erosion, including flow-accelerated corrosion and cavitationCH-06-8 IC-03-5
IC-04-3, 4, 5
IC-05-3  
1.1.7.3.4 fatigue failure/work hardeningMS-03- 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  
1.1.7.3.5 thermal shock/stress defintion, causes and effectsMS-05-1, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16  PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
1.1.7.3.6 -vibration induced crackingPPTEffects of Corrosion

PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials

1.1.8 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DETECTION
1.1.8.1 Explain the principles and operation of radiation detection and monitors including the following:
1.1.8.1.1 area radiation monitorsIC-09-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15  DOC Radiation Detection Principles and Instruments Instructor Notes

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOC Rad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

1.1.8.1.2 electronic dosimeter (self-reading pocket dosimeters)IC-09-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15  PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPT Radiographic Testing

PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOC Radiation Detection Principles and Instruments Instructor Notes

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibration and Data Analysis"  
1.1.8.1.3 gas-filled detectorsIC-09-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15  PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOC Radiation Detection Principles

PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPT Laboratory Instrumentation


PPT Instrumentation Review

DOC Radiaton Detection Principles and Instruments Instructor Notes

PPT Rad Measurements Instruments

DOC Rad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibration and Data Analysis"  
1.1.8.1.4 personnel dosimetry (for example, thermoluminescent detectors)IC-09-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15  PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOC Radiation Detection Principles


PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOC Radiation Detection Principles and Instruments Instructor Notes

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOC Rad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibration and Data Analysis"  
1.1.8.1.5 personnel monitors, whole body monitorsPPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibration and Data Analysis"  
1.1.8.1.6 process radiation monitors (liquid and gaseous)PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTGaseous Radwaste

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOC Rad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes
1.1.8.1.7 scintillation detectorsIC-09-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15  PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPT Laboratory Instrumentation

PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOC Radiation Detection Principles and Instruments Instructor Notes

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOC Rad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibration and Data Analysis"  
1.1.8.2 Explain radiation effects including the effects of radiation on matter and body tissues (such as somatic, genetic, acute and chronic)PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level

PPT Laboratory Instrumentation
1.1.8.3 Perform calculations that involve radioactive dose and matter as follows:
1.1.8.3.1 conversion of units (grays, sieverts, becquerel, curies, roentgen, rems, rads)PPTDose Equivalent

PPTRadiographic Testing

PPTBiological Effect of Radiation

PPTRadiographic Testing

PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTExternal Exposure Control




1.1.8.3.2 Explain exposure control including the following:PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTDose Equivalent

PPTBiological Effect of Radiation

PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level

PPTExternal Exposure Control


1.1.8.3.3 Explain exposure control including the following:PPTDose Equivalent

PPTBiological Effect of Radiation


PPTPlant Chemistry

PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTPlant Chemistry Overview

PPTExternal Exposure Control
1.1.8.4 Explain exposure control including the following:
1.1.8.4.1 contaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination and Respiratory Protection


PPTRadiological Controls


PPTProtection Against Radiation


PPTContamination Control


DOCContamination Control Lesson Plan




Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
1.1.8.4.2 decontaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination and Respiratory Protection


PPTProtection Against Radiation


PPTContamination Control


DOCContamination Control Lesson Plan




Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
1.1.8.4.3 exposure reduction methodsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination and Respiratory Protection


PPTRadiological Controls


PPTContamination Control


DOCContamination Control Lesson Plan




Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
1.1.8.4.4 protective clothing and respiratorsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination and Respiratory Protection


PPTRadiological Controls


PPTProtection Against Radiation


PPTContamination Control


DOCContamination Control Lesson Plan

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
1.1.8.4.5 provisions of 10CFR20PPTContamination Control, Decontamination and Respiratory Protection


PPTRadiological Controls


PPTProtection Against Radiation


PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry


PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

1.1.8.4.6 radiologically controlled areasPPTContamination Control, Decontamination and Respiratory Protection


PPTProtection Against Radiation

1.1.8.4.7 site administrative controls and limits (margin from regulatory limits)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination and Respiratory Protection


PPTRadiological Controls


PPTProtection Against Radiation


PPT Reactor Protection System




1.1.9 REACTOR PLANT PROTECTION
1.1.9.1 Explain basic concepts related to reactor plant protection, including:
1.1.9.1.1 administrative controls and procedural conceptsPPTProtection Against Radiation






1.1.9.1.2 automatic reactor plant protection conceptsPPT Nuclear Plant Systems


PPT Reactor Regulating Systems

1.1.9.1.3 defense in depthPPTReactor Protection System

1.1.9.1.4 fission product barriersPPTReactor Protection System


DOCReactor Coolant System Instructor Notes


1.1.9.1.5 limiting conditions for operationPPTCore Radiological Instructions


PPTPlant Status


DOCReactor Coolant System Instructor Notes
1.1.9.2 Summarize basic information about major industry operating experience including:
1.1.9.2.1 Three Mile Island Nuclear Station accidentPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response


PPTPost-Accident Sampling


PPTHistory of Nuclear Technology Reactor Design


DOC Nuclear Regulatory Commission


1.1.9.2.2 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accidentPPTPWR Systems


PPTHistory of Nuclear Technology Reactor Design



1.1.9.2.3 Salem Generating Station turbine blade throwPDFSalem Generating Plant Turbines

PPTHistory of Nuclear Technology Reactor Design
1.1.9.2.5 Idaho Falls stuck rod accidentPDFIdaho Falls

PPTHistory of Nuclear Technology Reactor Design
1.1.9.2.6 Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station eventPDFDavis-besse/a>

PPT
History of Nuclear Technology Reactor Design

1.1.10 COMPUTERS (Plant specific) Explain and perform basic computer commands (NOTE: This section of the National Academy ACAD documents is out of date and does not reflect current techology; it is considered plant specific.
1.1.11 REACTOR SAFETY DESIGN Content has been combined with Reactor Plant Protection
1.2 BASIC SYSTEMS KNOWLEDGE Describe general systems and components associated with a nuclear power plant.
1.2.1 Explain the basic operation of the following subsystems: Generic Overview (Included in Curriculum)
1.2.1.1 Chemical and volume control (PWR)PPTPWR Systems


PPTOverview of Nuclear Plant Systems

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems Lesson Plan

1.2.1.2 Circulating waterPPTResidual Heat & Reactor Operation

PPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor Systems

PPTIntroduction to BWR Systems

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems
1.2.1.3 CondensatePPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor Systems

PPTIntroduction to BWR Systems

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems

PPTOverview of Nuclear Plant Systems

DOCCondensate and Feedwater Systems Instructor Notes




1.2.1.4 ContainmentPPTNuclear Plant Systems

PPTResidual Heat & Reactor Operation

PPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor Systems

1.2.1.5 Containment sprayPPTNuclear Plant Systems

PPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor Systems

PPTIntroduction to BWR Systems
1.2.1.6 Control rod drive mechanismPPTNuclear Plant Systems

PPTPWR Systems


PPTIntroduction to BWR Systems


1.2.1.7 Emergency core cooling systemsPPTNuclear Plant Systems

PPTPWR Systems

PPTIntroduction to BWR Systems

PPTOverview of Nuclear Plant Systems




1.2.1.8 Emergency powerPPTNuclear Plant Systems

PPTPWR Systems

1.2.1.9 Environmental monitoringPPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program


1.2.1.10 FeedwaterPPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor Systems

PPTIntroduction to BWR Systems

PPTOverview of Nuclear Plant Systems
1.2.1.11 Main steamPPTNuclear Plant Systems

PPTIntroduction to BWR Systems

PPTPlant Status

PPTMain Steam System

DOC Main Steam Instructor Notes

PPTMain Steam System
1.2.1.12 Off-gas (BWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor Systems

PPTIntroduction to BWR Systems

DOCMain Steam Lesson Plan


1.2.1.13 Post-accident samplingPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTPost-Accident Sampling


1.2.1.14 Pressurizer (PWR)DOCReactor Coolant System Instructor Notes
1.2.1.15 Pressurizer relief (PWR)PPTPWR Systems
1.2.1.16 Radiation monitoringPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
1.2.1.17 Reactor coolantPPTIntroduction to BWR Systems

DOCPrimary Systems

DOCReactor Coolant System Instructor Notes

1.2.1.18 Reactor water cleanup (BWR)PPTPlant Chemistry Control

PPTPWR Systems
1.2.1.19 Recirculation (BWR)PPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor Systems

PPTIntroduction to BWR Systems
1.2.1.20 Residual heat removal/shutdown coolingNS-04-6, 7
NS-08-7, 8  
1.2.1.21 Suppression pool (BWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor Systems

PPTIntroduction to BWR Systems
Plant Specific (Included plant internship Training)
• Auxiliary feedwater (PWR)
• Closed cooling water systems
• Containment iodine removal
• Containment isolation  and cooling
• Containment pressure relief
• Containment purge
• Fine motion control rods (ABWR)
• Fuel handling equipment
• Fuel pool cooling
• Gross failed fuel detector
• Hydrogen recombiner and purge
• Ice condenser (PWR)
• In-core detectors (PWR)
• Instrument and control
• Isolation condenser (BWR)
• Penetration cooling
• Plant ventilation
• Pumps and seals
• Radioactive sump
• Radwaste
• Reactor internal pumps (ABWR)
• Standby liquid control (BWR)
• Sub atmospheric pressure containment operation
• Transverse in core probes (BWR)
• Waste gas decay (PWR)
• Waste treatment
• Water treatment
• Valve actuators
• Valve Packing
• Valve types
1.3 BASIC COMPONENTS KNOWLEDGE Describe basic construction, application, and operation of basic plant components.
1.3.1 Describe the theory, construction and application of the following mechanical components:
1.3.1.1 Air compressors (such as rotary, reciprocating, and centrifugal)ME-06-1, 2, 3, 4  
1.3.1.2 Heat exchangers (such as cross-flow, counter-flow and parallel flow); steam condensers and steam generators (U-tube and once-through)) - Include discussion on heat transfer across the heat exchanger and indications of heat exchanger foulingMS-03- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
HT-04-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
HT-05- 1, 2, 3, 4
ME-03-7  
1.3.1.3 Pumps, ejectors, and eductors such as for pumps (centrifugal, positive displacement) - Include centrifugal pump laws, series, and parallel operation; net positive suction head; requirements of minimum flow and effects of dead-heading pump; and causes and indications of cavitation and how to prevent it.ME-02-1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21  
1.3.1.4 Strainers, filters, and traps, including demineralizers, screens, and centrifuges for process filtration systemsME-05-1, 2  
1.3.1.5 Steam traps (such as lever-operated, piston-operated and float-operated)ME-04-1  
1.3.1.6 Steam turbines (such as impulse and reaction turbines, turbine arrangements and steam flow, high-pressure and low-pressure turbines)ME-10-5, 6  
1.3.1.7 Valves (such as gate, globe, butterfly, ball, check, needle, diaphragm-operated, plug, pressure relief, and safety) and dampers (pneumatic, hyraulic); limitations of different valve types (for example, gate valve not good for throttling)ME-01- 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11,12  PPTValves

PPTPneumatic Control Valves
1.3.2 Describe the theory, construction and application of diesel engines including the following:
1.3.2.1 Accessories/support systemsME-11-7  PPTEmergency Diesel Generator


PPTEmergency Diesel Generators (2)

1.3.2.2 Failure mechanisms and systemsME-11-8  PPTEmergency Diesel Generator


PPTEmergency Diesel Generators (2)

1.3.2.3 Main structural componentsME-11-2  PPTEmergency Diesel Generator


PPTEmergency Diesel Generators (2)

1.3.2.4 Main moving componentsME-11-1, 2  PPTEmergency Diesel Generator


PPTEmergency Diesel Generators (2)




1.3.2.5 Principles of operationsME-11-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  PPTEmergency Diesel Generator


PPTEmergency Diesel Generators (2)

1.3.3 Describe the theory, construction and application of air conditioning, heating and ventilation systems, including refrigeration machines and the basic refrigeration cycleME-07-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11
ME-08-2, 8
ME-08-3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 12  
1.3.4 Describe the theory, construction and application of structural and auxiliary equipment including the following:
1.3.4.1 boilers (such as electric, gas-fired, fuel-oil-fired)PPTBoilers and Thermic Fluid Heaters
1.3.4.2 elevators (such as basic operation of and basic rescue methodology)PPTElevator Systems, Hoists & Cranes

PPTHoists and Cranes

1.3.4.3 fire barriers (such as purpose and construction of and identification of barrier degradation)PPTFire Detection & Protection Systems

PPTFire Protection System

DOCFire Detection and Protection Instructor Notes

1.3.4.4 hangers and snubbers for support and restraint (such as discussion on water hammer and the different types, including water slug, valve slam, column rejoining and condensate induced)ME-12-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 ES-13- 4, 5  
1.3.4.5 hoists and cranes (such as manual and electric)PPTAuxiliary Mechanical Equipment

PPTElevator Systems, Hoists & Cranes

PPTHoists and Cranes

PPTInitial Rigging
1.3.5 Describe the theory, construction, and application of rotating equipment, including the following:
1.3.5.1 generatorsES-11-1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  PPTEmergency Diesel Generator


PPTEmergency Diesel Generators (2)

1.3.5.2 motorsES-12-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
ES-06-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13
ES-12-1, 3, 5, 8, 10
ES-14-7, 8, 9  
PPTPlant Overview--Motors
1.3.6 Describe the theory, construction and resistive electrical equipment including the following:
1.3.6.1 heatersME-08-5, 6  
1.3.6.2 heat tracing (such as reasons for using heat tracing)PPTRadiant Heat Transfer

1.3.7 Describe the theory, construction, and application of electrical supply components, including the following:
1.3.7.1 batteries and chargersES-07-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14  
1.3.7.2 circuit breakers (such as protection)ES-14-2, 3, 4, 6  PPTSwitchgear & Motor Control Centers
1.3.7.3 inverters and uninterruptible power suppliesES-07  
1.3.7.4 switchgear, load centers, and motor control centers (such as protective relaying and schematics of a basic system from high voltage to lower voltage)ES-14- 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  PPTPlant Status

PPTSwitchgear & Motor Control Centers
1.3.7.5 transformers (such as stepup transformers and stepdown transformers, winding configurations)ES-11- 12, 13, 14, 15, 16  
1.3.8 Describe the theory, construction and application of electrical control components including the following:
1.3.8.1 cable (such as routing for train separation and methods of fire detection/protection for cables/cable trays)PPTForeign Material Exclusion
1.3.8.2 control circuits (such as proportional, integral and derivative or a combination thereof)ES-14-1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9
IC-06-8, 9, 10, 11  
PPTReactor Regulating Systems

DOCFire Protection System Water Protection Instructor Notes

1.3.8.3 meters (such as voltage and current and how a change in meter indication could indicate circuit degradation of a change in process (pump discharge valve opened for increased flow))ES- 13-1, 3, 4  PPTElectronic Controls
1.3.8.4 relays (such as schematics to show operation of relays that energize to actuate, deenergize to actuate, time delay energize and time delay deenergize)ES-01-2
ES-14-2, 3  
PPTPlant Status
1.3.9 Describe the theory, construction and application of valve actuator types (such as motors, pneumatic, hydraulic) including the following:
1.3.9.1 manual operation (such as methods used for different types of actuators)IC 06- 1, 2, 3, 7
ME-01-4, 5, 6, 13  
PPTValves
1.3.9.2 position indication (such as methods for indication, local and remote indications and observation of process indications to determine valve position)ME-02-12, 13, 17, 18, 19  PPTValves

PPTPneumatic Control Valves

1.3.9.3 impact of environmental conditionsFrankilin Kirt, Thomas Weedon, Instrumentation, 5th Edition, ISBN: 978-0-82-69-3430-7; Chapter 41 Actuators and Positioners, p. 495  
1.3.10 Describe the theory and application of electronic equipment including the following:
1.3.10.1 analyzers (such as H2, O2 and chemical)Frankilin Kirt, Thomas Weedon, Instrumentation, 5th Edition, ISBN: 978-0-82-69-3430-7; Chapter 6Electrochemical and Composition Analyzers, p. 273  
1.3.10.2 computers/micro-processors (plant specific)
1.3.10.3 signal convertersFrankilin Kirt, Thomas Weedon, Instrumentation, 5th Edition, ISBN: 978-0-82-69-3430-7; Chapter 35, Automatic Control and Process Dynamics, p. 388  

 

Non-Licensed Operators

ACADsGP Stratagies Matris
Lesson - Chapter - Objectives
Gap Materials from RCNET & Academic PartnersTextbooks & Other Published Materials 
2.0 DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC CURRICULUM FOR NON-LICENSED OPERATORS
2.1 Plant systems and Components Knowledge: Power Plant FundamentalsThis section provides the knowledge and skills necessary to operate and monitor systems and components for which the nonlicensed operator is responsible. Actual course/training content should consider personnel entry-level knowledge, skills and experience as well as job and task analysis results. Some systems and components would apply only to certain reactor types. Explain the principles and describe the components associated with various plant systems. (These topics build on the gneral system and component knowledge that is part of the Basic Systems Knowledge curriculum and focus on the in-depth knowledge required for the nonlicensed operator discipline.
2.1.1 Explain basic concepts related to accident analysis:
2.1.1.1 anticipated radiation levelsPPTIAEA Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants

PPTI Accident Analysis
2.1.1.2 design basis accidentsPPTIAEA Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants

PPTAccident Analysis
2.1.1.3 descriptionsPPTIAEA Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants

PPTAccident Analysis
2.1.1.4 effect on workplacePPTIAEA Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants

PPTAccident Analysis

2.1.1.5 evacuation criteriaPPTIAEA Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants

PPTAccident Analysis

PPTReactor Regulating System
PPT
2.1.1.6 Final Safety Analysis ReportPPTIAEA Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants

PPTI Accident Analysis
2.1.1.7 recovery process mitigationPPTIAEA Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants

PPTI Accident Analysis
2.1.1.8 symptoms and indicationsPPTIAEA Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants
PPTI Accident Analysis
2.1.1.9 safety limitsPPTIAEA Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants

PPTAccident Analysis
2.1.2 Explain basic concepts related to transient prevention and mitigation of core damage and accident management, including the following:
2.1.2.1 core cooling mechanismsPPTPlant Status

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
2.1.2.2 core damageIC-03-5
IC-04-3, 4, 5
IC-05-3  
2.1.2.3 hydrogen hazards during accidentsPPTPlant Chemistry

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

DOC Radiological Hazards Associated with BWR

2.1.2.4 critical parameter monitoring during accident conditionsPPTPlant Status


PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

DOC Radiological Hazards Associated with BWR
2.1.2.5 radiation hazards and radiation monitor responsePPTPlant Status

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
2.1.3 Perform basic calculations and apply concepts for the following:
2.1.3.1 conditions of equilibriumPH-06-1, 2  
2.1.3.2 conservation of energyPH-04-3
PH-06-3, 4  
2.1.3.3 factors that affect lubricationME-09-6, 9  
2.1.3.4 laws of motion, such as linear and rotationalPH-03-2, 3, 4, 6, 7
PH-04-3  
2.1.4 Explain lubrication principles associated with the following:
2.1.4.1 determination of oil levels and requirements, and addition of correct oil to plant components (plant specific)
2.1.4.2 environmental hazardsME-09-24  
2.1.4.3 factors that affect lubricationME-09-6, 9  
2.1.4.4 friction and wearME-09-2, 11, 12  
2.1.4.5 fluid lubricationME-09-2  
2.1.4.6 lubricant types and characteristicsME-09-3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10  
2.1.4.7 purpose and necessityME-09-1  
2.1.4.8 storage and transferPPTLubricants storage and transportation
2.1.4.9 symptoms and problems associated with improper lubricationME-09-15, 16, 17, 21  
2.1.4.10 safety hazardsME-09-18  
2.1.5 Explain the principles associated with pumps and describe the following:
2.1.5.1 applications (series and parallel operation)ME-02-12, 13, 17, 18, 19  
2.1.5.2 components (impeller, bearings, seals, shafts, diffuser, volute)ME-02-3  
2.1.5.3 failure mechanisms and symptoms (such as excessive vibration, seizure, bad bearings)ME-02-6, 20  
2.1.5.4 impact of environmental conditions (dust, moisture)ME-02-20  
2.1.5.5 operating characteristics (centrifugal pump laws, net positive suction head, requirements of minimum flow and effect of dead-heading pump, pump starting duty causes, and indications of cavitation and how to prevent it)ME-02-2, 5, 6, 9, 11, 16  
2.1.5.6 types (centrifugal, positive displacement, such as reciprocating, gear type)ME-02-1, 2, 11,  
2.1.6 Explain the principles associated with manual valves and describe the following:
2.1.6.1 types (such as gate, globe, butterfly, ball, check, needle, diaphragm-operated, plug, pressure relief, safetyME-01-4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13  PPTValves

PPTPneumatic Control Valves
2.1.6.2 components (such as handle, stem, packing gland, valve disk, valve body, valve seat)ME-01-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9  PPTValves

PPTPneumatic Control Valves
2.1.6.3 failure mechanisms and symptoms (such as thermal binding, leakage, difficult to operate)IC-03-5
IC-04-3, 4, 5
IC-05-3
ME-01-16, 17, 18, 19  
PPTValves
2.1.6.4 functions (such as isolation, throttling, relief, draining, venting)ME-01-1  PPTValves

PPTPneumatic Control Valves
2.1.6.5 operating characteristics (such as valve application)ME-01-1  PPTValves
2.1.6.6 position indication (such as local, remote, process parameters)ME-01-13, 14, 15
IC-06-6, 7  
2.1.7 Explain the principles associated with valve operators and describe the following:
2.1.7.1 types (pneumatic, hydraulic, motor, solenoid)IC-06-1, 2, 4, 5, 7  PPTValves

PPTPneumatic Control Valves
2.1.7.2 principles of operation for motor-operated valves, air-operated valves and hydraulic-operated valvesIC-06-1, 2, 4, 5, 7  PPTValves

PPTPneumatic Control Valves
2.1.7.3 failure mechanisms and symptoms (loss of power, air leaks, loss of hydraulics)IC-03-5
IC-04-3, 4, 5
IC-05-3  
2.1.7.4 manual operation (such as override or failure)IC-06- 7  
2.1.7.5 alignment for remote control and/or automatic operationIC-06-6, 7  
2.1.7.6 testingPPTValves

PPTPneumatic Control Valves
2.1.7.7 impact of environmental conditionsIC-06-1  
2.1.8 Explain the principles and describe the components associated with strainers & filters
2.1.8.1 purposeME-05-1, 2  
2.1.8.2 typesME-05-1, 4  
2.1.8.3 operationME-05-4  
2.1.9 Explain the principles associated with steam traps and describe the following:
2.1.9.1 purposeME-04-1, 2  
2.1.9.2 types (such as lever-operated, piston-operated and float-operated)ME-04-4  
2.1.9.3 principles of operationME-04-3  
2.1.10 Explain the principles associated with steam turbines and describe the following:
2.1.10.1 main components (such as shaft, turbine nozzles, bearings, control and stop valves)ME-10- 2, 3, 4  
2.1.10.2 classification according to steam flow (such as straight, reheat and extraction)ME-10- 7  
2.1.10.3 principles of operation (such as for impulse and reaction turbines)ME-10- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  
2.1.10.4 accessories/support systems (such as electrohydraulic controls, condensers, moisture separators, preheaters)ME-10- 8  PPTCooling Towers and Air Cooled Condensers

2.1.10.5 failure mechanisms and symptoms (such as overspeed, loss of condenser vacuum, high vibration)ME-10- 9  
2.1.11 Explain the principles associated with heat exchangers and describe the following:
2.1.11.1 purpose (such as heating, cooling, condensing, steam generators)ME-03- 2  PPTCooling Towers and Air Cooled Condensers
2.1.11.2 typesME-03- 1  
2.1.11.3 classification by flow (such as cross-flow, counter-flow and parallel flow)ME-03- 5  DOCFuel Pool Cooling and Cleanup System Instructor Notes

2.1.11.4 classification by heat transfer processME-03- 4  
2.1.11.5 major components (such as shell, tubes, relief valves, vacuum breakers)ME-03- 3  
2.1.11.6 principles of operationME-03- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  
2.1.11.7 failure mechanisms and symptoms (such as air binding, tube leaks, heat transfer reduction)ME-03-6  
2.1.12 Explain the principles associated with air compressors and describe the following:
2.1.12.1 types (such as rotary, reciprocating, centrifugal)ME-06-1, 2, 3, 4  
2.1.12.2 classificationsME-06-1, 2, 3, 4  
2.1.12.3 components (such as staging, relief valve, cooling water)ME-06-1, 2, 3, 4  
2.1.12.4 principles of operationME-06-1, 2, 3, 4  
2.1.12.5 failure mechanisms and symptoms (such as power loss, line ruptures, air pressure reduction, air operated component repositioning)ME-06-1, 2, 3, 4  
2.1.13 Explain the principles associated with diesel engines and describe the following:
2.1.13.1 principles of operation (such as internal combustion)ME-11-1, 3, 4, 5, 7  
2.1.13.2 main structural components (such as frame, block, pedestal, fuel distribution system)ME-11-1, 2  
2.1.13.3 main moving components (such as postons, cylinders, crankshaft, bearings, valves, control air, turbochargers)ME-11-1, 2  
2.1.13.4 accessories/support systems (such as air start, cooling water, lube oil, electrical, fuel oil distribution)ME-11-7  
2.1.13.5 failure mechanisms and symptoms (such as failure to start, failure to reach operating speed, failure to stop, rough idling)ME-11-8  
2.1.14 Explain the principles associated with electrical generation and distribution and describe the following:
2.1.14.1 switchgear, load centers, and motor control centers (such as protective tripping)ES-14-7, 8, 9  PPTSwitchgear & Motor Control Centers
2.1.14.2 switchyard equipment (such as equipment monitoring)PPTElectrical Distribution
2.1.14.3 transformers (such as types and configuration (for example, Delta-wye) step up/step down)ES-11-2, 13, 14, 15, 16  
2.1.14.4 motors and control circuits (such as startup and shutdown, protection devices)ES-12-1, 3, 5, 8, 10
ES-14-7, 8, 9  
PPTPlant Overview--Motors

DOCFire Protection System Water Protection Instructor
Notes


2.1.14.5 generators (such as operation and monitoring of diesel-driven, turbine-driven, motor-generators)ES-05-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13
ME-11-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  
PPTEmergency Diesel Generator
2.1.14.6 impact of environmental conditionsIC-06-1  
2.1.15 Explain the principles associated with instrument and control and describe the following:
2.1.15.1 basic control circuits (such as proportional, integral, derivative and a combination of the three; saturation cutoff, steady-state error, limiters, effects of disturbances)ES-10-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
IC-01-1, 3
IC-06-8, 9, 10, 11  
PPTReactor Regulating Systems

2.1.15.2 pneumatic devices (such as actuators)IC-06- 1, 2, 3  PPTReactor Regulating Systems
2.1.15.3 sensors (such as types of sensors, for example, pressure, flow, temperature)IC-01-2
IC-02-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14
IC-03- 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8
IC-04-1
IC-05-1, 3, 4
IC-07- 1, 3  
PPTReactor Regulating Systems
2.1.15.4 hydraulic controls (such as actuators)IC-06- 1, 2  PPTReactor Regulating Systems
2.1.16 Explain the principles associated with refrigeration machines and with air conditioning, heating and ventilation and describe the following:
2.1.16.1 purposeME-07-1 ME-08-1  
2.1.16.2 basic equipment (such as chiller units, heating units, fans, blowers, filters, ductwork, blowout ducts)ME-07-2, 4, 6, 8
ME-08-2, 8  
2.1.16.3 principles of operation (such as basic refrigeration cycle)ME-07-2
ME-08-1, 5, 6, 10, 11
ME-12-2, 3  
2.1.16.4 main structural componentsME-07-2
ME-08-3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 12  
2.1.16.5 failure mechanisms and symptoms (such as loss of environmental control, loss of coolant charge, high- and low-pressure cutoffs, gas binding of cooling system)ME-07-5, 10, 11
ME-12-10, 11, 12  
2.1.17 Explain the principles and use of test equipment (plant specific)
2.1.17.1 principles of operation
2.1.17.2 type
2.1.17.3 failure mechanisms and symptoms
2.2 PLANT SYSTEMS AND COMPONENTS (plant specific) Identify the major systems, components, and equipment; state the purpose of each.
2.2.1 Explain the system flow paths (given a copy of the system piping and instrument drawing)
2.2.2 Explain system operations necessary to support implementation of emergency operating procedure actions outside the control room
2.2.3 Explain the basic principles of operation for the system and the major components and equipment
2.2.4 Describe instrumentation and controls, including symptoms of failure modes
2.2.5 Describe system automatic features
2.2.6 Identify normal and alarm values for significant monitored parameters
2.2.7 Identify the basic interrelationships with other plant systems
2.2.8 Describe system precautions and limitations
2.2.9 Identify any hazards associated with the system
2.2.10 Assist in diagnosing the cause of abnormal system conditions
2.2.11 Respond to abnormal system conditions
2.2.12 Explain the importance to plant safety
2.2.13 Identify conditions that preclude safe work in the vicinity of system components
2.2.14 Identify the impact of system operability on technical specifications
2.2.15 As applicable to the specific plant, identify the following systems, state the purpose of each and perform tasks related to the nonlicensed operator job
• Auxiliary feedwater (PWR)
• Auxiliary shutdown panel
• Auxiliary steam
• Borated refueling water storage tank (PWR)
• Chemical and volume control (PWR)
• Chemical storage and handling
• Chilled water
• Circulating water
• Communications
• Component cooling water
• Compressed gas/air
• Condensate
• Condensate polishers
• Condensate storage and transfer
• Condenser air removal
• Containment
• Containment cooling
• Containment isolation
• Containment iodine removal
• Containment pressure relief
• Containment purge
• Containment spray
• Control rod drive
• Control rod drive hydraulics (boiling water reactor) (BWR)
• Cranes/hoists/elevators
• Demineralized water
• Electrical distribution
• Electrohydraulic control oil
• Emergency core cooling
• Mergency diesel generators
• Emergency power
• Emergency service water
• Feedwater
• Feedwater heaters and extraction drains
• Fine motion control rods (ABWR)
• Fire protection
• Floor and equipment drains
• Fuel handling equipment
• Fuel pool cooling
• Gaseous radwaste
• Generator cooling
• Generator exciter
• Generator hydrogen supply
• High-pressure coolant injection (BWR)
• High-pressure core spray (BWR)
• Hydrogen recombiner and purge
• Hydrogen seal oil
• Instrument air
• Isolated phase bus duct cooling
• Liquid radwaste
• Low-pressure core spray (BWR)
• Lube oil purification systems
• Main generator
• Main steam
• Main turbine
• Main turbine lube oil
• Mechanical/natural draft cooling towers
• Neutron instrumentation
• Off-gas (BWR)
• Penetration cooling
• Plant heating
• Plant ventilation
• Post-accident sampling
• Pressurizer (PWR)
• Pressurizer relief (PWR)
• Radiation monitoring
• Radwaste: liquid and solid
• Reactor building closed cooling water (BWR)
• Reactor coolant
• Reactor core isolation cooling (BWR)
• Reactor internal pumps (ABWR)
• Reactor protection
• Reactor water cleanup (BWR)
• Reactor water makeup
• Recirculation (BWR)
• Reheat
• Residual heat removal/shutdown cooling
• Safety injection
• Safety injection accumulators
• Safety relief (BWR)
• Seismic instrumentation
• Service air
• Service water
• Standby gas treatment (BWR)
• Standby liquid control (BWR)
• Station air
• Stator water cooling system
• Steam generator (PWR)
• Steam generator blowdown recovery (PWR)
• Steam seal supply
• Suppression pool (BWR)
• Suppression pool makeup
• Switchyard
• Turbine building closed cooling
• Vital batteries
• Waste gas decay (PWR)
• Waste treatments (oil, sanitary, water discharges, and chemical)
• Water treatment
• Other systems unique to the plant





2.2.16 Draw a simple system diagramPPTElectrical Distribution


PPT Basic Print Reading

PPTElectrical Prints and Drawings

PPTPlant Status

PPTMechanical Print Reading

PPTMechanical Print Reading (2)

PPTOverview of Nuclear Plant Systems

Radiological Protection Technicians

ACADsGP Strategies
Matrix Lesson
Chapter Objectives
GAP Materials
from RCNET &
Academic Partners
Textbook & Other
Published Materials
Web - Based
Resources
3.0 DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC CURRICULUM FOR RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION TECHNICIANS
3.1 Plant Systems and Components Knowledge: Systems Explain the principles and describe the components associated with various systems. (These topics build on the general system and component knowledge that is part of the Basic Systems Knowledge curriculum and focus on the in-depth knowledge required for the radiological protection technician discipline.)
3.1.1 Explain the importance of the following systems to plant safety and radioactivity containment and identify any radiological hazards and precautions associated with maintenance tasks for each
3.1.1.1 chemical and volume control (PWR)DOCPrimary Systems

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems Lesson Plan

PPT Pressurizer and PRT

DOC Chemical and Oily Waste Water
3.1.1.2 circulating waterPPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems Lesson Plan

3.1.1.3 condensate containmentPPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems


PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

DOCCondensate and Feedwater Systems Instructor Notes

3.1.1.4 containment sprayPPTBoiling Water Reactor System


PPTPlant Status

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.5 control rod drive mechanismPPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.6 emergency core cooling systemsDOCPrimary Systems

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems Lesson Plan

3.1.1.7 environmental monitoringPPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOC Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

3.1.1.8 feedwaterPPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

DOCCondensate and Feedwater Systems Instructor Notes

PPTDigital Feedwater Control Systems

3.1.1.9 main steamPPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Steam System

DOCMain Steam Instructor Notes


PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

3.1.1.10 off-gas (BWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

3.1.1.11 post-accident samplingPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTPost Accident Sampling

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.12 pressurizer (PWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

DOCReactor Coolant System Instructor Notes
3.1.1.13 pressurizer relief (PWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor System


PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.14 radiation monitoringDOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.15 reactor coolantIC-02-3  PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

DOCReactor Coolant System Instructor Notes
3.1.1.16 reactor water clean-up (BWR)PPTPlant Chemistr Overview

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.17 recirculation (BWR)DOCDOC Primary Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System
PPT
Plant Status

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.18 residual heat removal/shutdown coolingNS-04-6, 7
NS-08-7, 8  
PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.19 suppression pool (BWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
Plant specific (Included plant internship Training)
• Auxiliary feedwater (PWR)
• Closed cooling water systems
• Containment iodine removal
• Containment isolation  and cooling
• Containment pressure relief
• Containment purge
• Fine motion control rods (ABWR)
• Fuel handling equipment
• Fuel pool cooling
• Gross failed fuel detector
• Hydrogen recombiner and purge
• Ice condenser (PWR)
• In-core detectors (PWR)
• Instrument and control
• Isolation condenser (BWR)
• Penetration cooling
• Plant ventilation
• Pumps and seals
• Radioactive sump
• Radwaste
• Reactor internal pumps (ABWR)
• Standby liquid control (BWR)
• Sub atmospheric pressure containment operation
• Transverse in core probes (BWR)
• Waste gas decay (PWR)
• Waste treatment
• Water treatment
• Valve actuators
• Valve Packing
• Valve types
3.1.2 Draw a basic system block diagramPPTElectrical Distribution

PPT Basic Print Reading

PPTElectrical Prints and Drawings

PPTPlant Status

PPTMechanical Print Reading

PPTMechanical Print Reading (2)

PPTOverview of Nuclear Plant Systems
3.1.3 Identify conditions that preclude safe work in the vicinity of system componentsPPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.1.4 Identify the basic interrelationships with other plant systemsPPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTMechanical Print Reading

PPTMechanical Print Reading (2)

PPTMain Steam System

DOC Main Steam Instructor Notes
KEEP
3.2 TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
KEEP
3.2.1 General Tools and Test Equipment (Plant Specific)
3.2.1.1 Explain procedures to check out and return radioactive contaminated tools and test equipment.
3.2.1.2 Identify those tools and equipment that may not be taken into radiologically controlled environments without specific controls in place.
3.2.1.3 Identify power sources that may be connected to tools and test equipment.
3.2.1.4 Explain the requirements for instruments and test equipment calibration.
3.2.1.5 Explain how to determine tool and equipment calibration status.
3.2.1.6 Describe proper methods of protecting tools and test equipment for the following:
3.2.1.6.1 In a radiologically controlled area
3.2.1.6.2 In a confined space
3.2.1.6.3 When working from heights
3.2.1.6.4 When working near open systems
3.2.2 Radiation Detection and Measurement Principles Discuss the basic theory of operation and operating characteristics of detectors, to include instrument efficiency, the factors that affect instrument efficiency, and the calculation of efficiency from given information; the effects of background radiation; and differentiation between the operating characteristics of a radiation field survey instrument and a radioactive contamination survey instrument.
3.2.2.1 Explain the function of an ion chamber, proportional counter, alpha scintillation detectors, plastic scintillation detectors and Geiger-Mueller counterIC-09- 4, 5, 6, 7,  PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Lecture Notes

PPTInstrumentation Review

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Instructor Notes

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement

PPTRad Measurements Instruments
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
3.2.2.2 Draw and explain gas-filled detector six region curve, including gas amplificationIC-09- 2, 3  DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Lecture Notes

PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRad Measurements Instruments


DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibration and Data Analysis"  
3.2.2.3 Explain the function of a scintillation (micro-r meters, liquid scintillation counters, zinc-sulfide alpha counters and probes), fission chamber and semiconductors (high-purity germanium, electronic dosimeters)IC-09-1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Lecture Notes

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Instructor Notes

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
3.2.3 Radiological Survey and Analysis Instruments
3.2.3.1 Explain the operating characteristics and basic electrical circuitry of each survey instrumentPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
3.2.3.2 Perform and describe operational checks on survey instruments, such as battery, zero, source, response, background and calibrationPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
3.2.3.3 Identify conditions that might affect survey instrument response, including the following:
3.2.3.3.1 atmospheric pressurePPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.2 extreme temperaturesPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.3 geotropismPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.4 high humidityPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.5 mixed radiation fieldsPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.6 noble gas atmospheresPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.7 off-scale readingPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.8 radiofrequency interferencePPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.4 Identify the instruments available for performing radiation surveys and demonstrate proficiency in using the instruments (plant specific)
3.2.3.5 Describe plant requirements for documentation of radiation surveys, including the use of survey maps, the review of completed surveys, the retention of records and the updating of area maps and postings (plant specific)
3.2.3.6 Explain actions to be taken if radiation levels are off scale on the instrument in use (plant specific)
3.2.3.7 Select the appropriate instrument for performance of radiation surveys under various conditions, based on expected radiation types, expected dose rate and environmental conditions (plant specific)
3.2.3.8 Identify the instruments available for performing contamination surveys such as the following:
3.2.3.8.1 alpha scintillation detectorsIC-09- 7  PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

PPTInstrumentation Review

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Instructor Notes

PPTRad Measurements Instruments
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
3.2.3.8.2 Geiger-Mueller tubesIC-09- 6  PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

PPTInstrumentation Review

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Instructor Notes
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
3.2.3.8.3 plastic scintillation detectorsIC-09- 7  PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Instructor Notes
3.2.3.8.4 proportional countersIC-09- 5  PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

PPTInstrumentation Review

DOCEnvironmental Sample Counting Using Proportional Counters

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Instructor Notes
KEEP
3.2.3.9 Explain the effect of background radiation on the ability to detect low levels of contamination (plant specific including plant limits applicable to each instrument type)
3.2.3.10 Explain how to obtain and record dose rates from mixed radiation fields (plant specific)
3.2.3.11 Define general area and contact dose rates (plant specific - identify each on survey maps)
3.2.3.12 Convert meter indications of contamination detection equipment to contamination levels in standard units (cpm to dpm/100cm2)PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments
3.2.3.13 Demonstrate proper techniques for surveying an item for contamination (loose and fixed) using a hand-held friskerPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control Lesson Plan
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
KEEP
3.2.3.14 Describe plant requirements for documentation of contamination surveys, including the use of survey maps, the review of completed surveys, the retention of records and the updating of area maps and postings (plant specific)
3.2.3.15 Estimate contamination levels when indications are off scale on contamination detection equipment (plant specific)
3.2.3.16 Explain the operating characteristics and basic electrical circuitry of counting and spectroscopy equipment (such as proportional counters, liquid scintillation detectors, high-purity germanium, zinc sulfide detectors)IC-09-1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
3.2.3.17 Perform and describe operational checks on counting and spectroscopy equipment resolution, source, response and backgroundPPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

3.2.3.18 Identify unusual conditions that might affect counting and spectroscopy equipment response such as high humidity, abnormal background, electronic noise and extreme temperaturePPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

PPTRad Measurements Instruments
3.2.3.19 Describe the statistical nature of radioactive decay as it relates to uncertainties encountered when measuring radioactivity (such as normal distribution curves, standard deviations, confidence levels, lower limits of detection and minimum detectable activity)PPTPPT Statistics: Dealing with Uncertainty

PPTPPT Counting Statistics

DOCDOC Counting Statistics Instructor Notes
3.2.3.20 Identify factors that affect the statistical accuracy of radioactivity measurements, including count rate, background, count time, equipment efficiency, sample volume and sample geometry. Explain how the statistical accuracy of measurements can be improvedPPTPPT Statistics: Dealing with Uncertainty

PPTPPT Radiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTPPT Detector Efficiency

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

PPTPPT Counting Statistics

DOCCounting Statistics Instructor Notes
3.2.3.21 Define the lower limit of detection (LLD)PPTPPT Detector Efficiency
3.2.3.22 Perform LLD and minimum count rate calculations for various radioactivity measurementsPPTPPT Detector Efficiency
KEEP
3.2.3.23 Explain the operating characteristics and use of the following radiological survey and analysis instruments:
3.2.3.23.1 alpha survey instrumentPPTPPT Portable Radiation Survey Instruments/a>





3.2.3.23.2 beta/gamma survey instrumentPPTPPT Portable Radiation Survey Instruments/a>
3.2.3.23.3 friskerPPTPPT Portable Radiation Survey Instruments/a>
3.2.3.23.4 gamma survey instrumentPPTPPT Portable Radiation Survey Instruments/a>
3.2.3.23.9 multichannel analyzer (gamma spectrometer)IC-09- 8,  
3.2.3.23.10 neutron survey instrumentPPTPPT Portable Radiation Survey Instruments/a>
3.2.3.23.11 proportional countersPPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTPPT Laboratory Instrumentation

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
3.2.3.24 Explain the principles of operation of area radiation monitoring systemsIC-09-1, 9  DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Lecture Notes

3.2.3.25 Explain the principles of operation of process radiation monitoring systemsIC-09-1, 9  
KEEP
3.2.3.26 Identify the locations of the area and process radiation monitoring systems and their associated components (plant specific)
3.2.3.27 Identify unusual conditions that might affect radiation monitoring systems response such as high humidity, abnormal background, mixed radiation fields and temperature effectsIC-09-1, 9  
KEEP
3.2.3.28 Explain the operating characteristics and use of monitoring devices including the following monitors:
3.2.3.28.8 personnel whole-body contaminationPPTPPT Protection Against Radiation

PPTPPT Personnel Monitoring
KEEP
3.2.4 SAMPLE COLLECTION EQUIPMENT Identify the types and describe the application of sample collection equipment:
3.2.4.1 Describe the application and explain the principles of operations of each type of sample collection equipmentPPTPPT Air Sampling

PPTPPT Airborne Radioactivity Surveys/a>

DOC
DOC Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCDOC Airborne Radioactivity Surveys

KEEP
3.2.4.2 Identify the locations of each type of sample collection equipment (plant specific)
3.2.4.3 Describe identifying isotopes and quantifying radioactivity present in samples (plant specific - describe plant procedures for)
3.2.4.4 Convert detection equipment indications to airborne radioactivity in standard units (Ci/cm3) and in derived air concentration, to specific activity (CI/ml) for liquid samples , or to specific activity (Ci/g) for solid samplesPPTPPT Air Sampling

PPT PPT Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCDOC Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
KEEP
3.2.4.5 Operate the following air sampling equipment and describe when each is used:
3.2.4.5.1 continuous air monitorsDOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys

PPTContinuous Air Monitors
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation,Appx, p.723, 778 H.J.Moe, Operational Health Physics Training, Argonne National Laboratory, Argon, Illinois, 1992, p. 14-16 "Continuous Air Monitors "  
3.2.4.5.2 high volume samplersPPTPPT Air Sampling

PPT PPT Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCDOC Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys

PPTContinuous Air Monitors

PPTHigh and Low Volume Samplers

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 10, "Environmental Monitoring Programs and Equipment", p.430  
3.2.4.5.3 low volume samplersPPTPPT Air Sampling

PPT PPT Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCDOC Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys

PPTContinuous Air Monitors

PPTHigh and Low Volume Samplers
KEEP
3.2.4.6 Perform sampling of liquids, viscous liquids, multiple interfaced liquids, resins, sludge, soil, and snow (plant specific).
3.2.4.7 Collect samples using planchettes, beakers (for example, Marinelli) and post-accident filter assembly (plant specific)
3.2.5 CALIBRATION SOURCES AND EQUIPMENT Explain calibration procedures
3.2.5.1 Describe procedures for use of calibration source. (plant specific)
3.2.5.2 Discuss the type of equipment required to calibrate plant survey instruments and radiation monitors.PPTMeasuring Pressure

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments
3.2.5.3 Discuss the type of equipment required to calibrate counting and spectroscopy equipment.PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments
3.2.5.4 Describe the precautions associated with calibration procedures and calibration source handling.PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTMeasuring Pressure
3.2.5.5 Identify the criteria for proper calibration of counting and spectroscopy equipment.PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
3.2.5.6 Identify the criteria for proper calibration of survey instruments and radiation monitors.PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
KEEP
3.2.5.7 Demonstrate the proper use of calibration procedures as required by specification for each instrument or system. (plant specific)
3.2.5.8 Describe the use of calibration source decay curves.PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
KEEP
3.2.5.9 Describe source accountability procedures. (plant specific)
3.2.5.11 Describe disposal of sources, including licensed and nonlicensed (plant specific)
KEEP
3.3 RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION THEORY AND TECHNIQUES
KEEP
3.3.1 RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIOACTIVE DECAY Explain and apply the theory of radioactivity and radioactive decay.
3.3.1.1 Identify the types of radioactive decay (alpha, beta, gamma, electron capture and internal conversion)NS-03-2, 5, 6, 8  PPTRadioactive Decay

3.3.1.2 Use basic equations to describe each type of decay.MA-02- 2, 3, 4, 5 MA-03- 2, 3,
MA-04- 1, 2, 4, 6, 7
MA-05-1, 2, 3
, 4
MA-06-1, 2, 3 MA-10- 2, 3  
3.3.1.3 Use exponential equations and appropriate graphs (linear and semi-log) to perform radioactive calculationsMA-05-1, 2, 3, 4 MA-06-1, 2, 3
MA-10- 2, 3  
3.3.1.4 Characterize alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, and neutrons (for example, describe the physical properties of these types of radiation).NS-01-1, 2, 3, 4, 5 NS-08-1  PPTInteractions with Matter

3.3.1.5 Describe the process of neutron activation using basic equations.MA-02- 2, 3, 4, 5 MA-03- 2, 3,
MA-04- 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 MA-05-1, 2, 3, 4 MA-06-1, 2, 3
MA-10- 2, 3  
3.3.1.6 Identify specific isotopes of concern in power reactors during operation and following shutdown (such as H-3, N-16, Ar-41, Cr-51, Mn-54, Fe-55, Co-58, Co-60, Zn-65, Kr-85, Kr-88, Zr-95, Ag-110m, I-131-135, Xe-133-135, Cs-134, Cs-137 and transuranics).NS-01- 2, 4, 5
NS-03-2, 7  
PPTTransuranic Waste Disposal

3.3.1.7 Discuss complex decay schemes, such as natural decay chains, reactor-produced decay chain, and equilibrium isotopes (secular, transient, or no equilibrium).NS-03-2, 3, 4, 5, 7  PPTRadioactive Decay

KEEP
3.3.1.9 Identify, calculate and use the following significant dose terms:
3.3.1.9.1 deepPPTExposure Rate

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTPersonnel Monitoring

PPTExternal Exposure Control

3.3.1.9.2 eye (lens, shallow, effective (using weighting factors))PPTExposure Rate

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTPersonnel Monitoring

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.1.9.3 committed (for example, using in vivo and in vitro measurements and intake retention fractions)PPTExposure Rate

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTPersonnel Monitoring

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.1.9.4 committed effective (using in vivo and in vitro measurements and intake retention fractions)PPTExposure Rate

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTPersonnel Monitoring

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.1.9.5 total effectivePPTDose Equivalent

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.1.9.6 total organ dose equivalentPPTAir Sampling

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.1.10 Equate radioactivity to dose rate through simple rules of thumb and associated calculation for various source geometries (for example, 6CEN, point source, line source, plane source).PPTExposure Rate

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
KEEP
3.3.2 SOURCES OF RADIATION Identify and quantify sources of radiation
3.3.2.1 Identify and quantify these major sources of natural background radiation: cosmic radiation, uranium, thorium decay chains, potassium 40, and radon gas, including daughter products.PPTBackground Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation
3.3.2.2 Identify and quantify the following man-made sources of background radiation: medical diagnostic x-rays, radio pharmaceuticals, consumer products (TV, luminous dials), weapons tests, and air travel.PPTBackground Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation
3.3.2.3 Identify and quantify potential sources of exposure to the public from the plant liquid and gaseous effluent releases, transportation of radioactive materials, and major accidents.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTGaseous Radwaste

KEEP
3.3.2.4 Identify and quantify the following major sources of radiation in the plant that contribute to worker exposures:
3.3.2.4.1 primary system piping and componentsDOCPrimary Systems

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.2.4.2 inside containment during power operationDOCPrimary Systems

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.2.4.3 primary system filters and demineralizersPPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTALARA for Engineers

3.3.2.4.4 radwaste process systemsPPTTransuranic Waste Disposal

PPTGaseous Radwaste

3.3.2.4.5 radiographyPPTRadiographic Testing

KEEP
3.3.3 INTERACTIONS OF RADIATION WITH MATTER
3.3.3.1 Define the following terms: excitation, ionization, secondary ionization, and specific ionization.PPTInteractions with Matter

PPTInstrumentation Review

PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRadiaton Detection Principles and Instruments_Instructor Notes

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibration and Data Analysis"  
3.3.3.2 Describe the processes and characteristics of heavy charged particle (alpha particles, protons) interaction with matter, to include energy transfer by ionization and excitation; range-energy relationship; range of alpha particles in air, water, and tissue; and specific ionization as a function of distance.NS-01-1, 2, 5
NS-03-1, 2, 3, 4, 5 NS-04-1, 2  
PPTInteractions with Matter
3.3.3.3 Describe the processes and characteristics of beta particle interactions with matter, including range-energy relationship; energy transfer by ionization, excitation, and bremsstrahlung; irregular track due to scattering; bremsstrahlung production using high atomic number absorber; and range of beta particles in air, water and tissue (content added: density thickness).PPTInteractions with Matter
3.3.3.4 Define linear energy transfer and relative stopping for beta interactions.PPTDose Equivalent

PPTExternal Exposure Control


PPTInteractions with Matter
KEEP
3.3.3.11 Perform gamma and neutron shielding calculations using the following:
3.3.3.11.1 exponential shielding equationPPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.3.11.2 half and tenthPPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.3.11.3 thickness valuesPPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Radiation Exposure Control

H.J.Moe, Operational Health Physics Training, Argonne National Laboratory, Argon, Illinois, 1992, p.8-10  
3.3.3.11.4 empirically derived graphsH.J.Moe, Operational Health Physics Training, Argonne National Laboratory, Argon, Illinois, 1992, p.8-10  
3.3.3.12 Identify common shielding practices for beta particles (low Z number materials), neutrons (hydrogenous material) and gammas (high density, high Z number materials).PPTPlant Chemistry Control

PPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.3.13 Describe the phenomenon of sky shine and the means by which it can be minimized.PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.3.14 Apply quality factors for converting dose to dose equivalent (use 10CFR20).PPTRadiographic Testing

PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
KEEP
3.3.4 BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO IONIZING RADIATION
3.3.4.1 Describe the mechanisms of radiation interactions with cells (primary, secondary/free radicals).PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level

DOCSkin Dose
3.3.4.2 Identify cell characteristics that affect radiosensitivity (cells with a longer dividing future, division rate, and cell type).PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level

DOCSkin Dose
3.3.4.3 Define stochastic and non-stochastic (deterministic) effects.PPTRadiographic Testing

PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level
KEEP
3.3.4.4 Explain the difference between acute and chronic radiation exposure and for each, describe the following:
3.3.4.4.1 somatic effectsPPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level
3.3.4.4.2 genetic effectsPPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level
3.3.4.4.3 teratogenic effectsPPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level
3.3.4.5 For acute exposures, describe the following: dose response relationship, acute radiation syndrome, and LD-50/30.PPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level
3.3.4.12 Discuss why radiation exposures to both individuals and groups of workers should be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.4.13 Discuss the risk to the general public from operation of a nuclear plant and compare it to other risks accepted in everyday life.PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.4.14 Discuss the risk to a declared pregnant worker and fetus.PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
KEEP
3.3.5 RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION STANDARDS Discuss and explain the historical development, purpose, and philosophy of radiation protection standards.
3.3.5.1 Discuss the historical development of radiological protection standards.
PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level

DOCThe National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements

DOCInternational Commission on Radiological Protection

DOCAmerican National Standards Institute

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.2 Explain the purpose of radiological protection standards and guidelinesPPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
KEEP
3.3.5.3 Identify the regulatory and advisory organizations that have cognizance in this area and describe the function of each.
3.3.5.3.1 International Commission on Radiation ProtectionDOCInternational Commission on Radiological Protection

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.2 National Council on Radiation Protection and MeasurementsDOCThe National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.3 International Commission on Radiation Units and MeasurementsPDFInternational Commission on Radiation Units & Measures

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.4 International Atomic Energy AgencyDOCAtomic Energy Agency

DOCInternational Atomic Energy Agency

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.5 American National Standards InstituteDOCAmerican National Standards Institute

PPT
The Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.6 Nuclear Regulatory CommissionDOCNuclear Regulatory Commission

PPT
The Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.7 Department of TransportationDOCDepartment of Transportation

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.8 Agreement stateDOCAgreement State

PPT
The Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.4 Discuss the philosophy of radiation protection limits, including the prevention of nonstochastic effects, minimization of stochastic effects, concept of acceptable risk or comparable risk, concepts of cost versus benefit and ALARA.PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level

DOCThe National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements

DOCInternational Commission on Radiological Protection
DOCAmerican National Standards Institute

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines


PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTProtection Against Radiation
KEEP
3.3.5.5 Define and discuss the interrelationship among the following:
3.3.5.5.1 regulationPPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.5.5.2 regulatory guidePPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.5.5.3 NUREGPPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.5.5.4 recommendation (health physics position papers)PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.5.5.5 license conditionPPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.5.5.6 technical specificationPPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.5.6 Explain the principles and use the following standards:
3.3.5.6.1 10 CFR 19--Notices, Instructions, and Reports to WorkersPPTRadiographic Testing

PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry


PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
3.3.5.6.2 10CFR 20--Standards for Protection Against RadiationPPTRadiographic Testing

PPTRadiation Protection Postings

PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
3.3.5.6.3 10CFR 21--Reporting of Defects and NoncompliancePPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
3.3.5.6.4 10CFR 34--Licenses for Radiography and Radiation Safety Requirements for Radiographic OperationsPPTRadiographic Testing

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
3.3.5.6.5 10CFR 50--Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization FacilitiesPPTPlant Status

PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
3.3.5.6.6 10CFR 61--Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of RadwastePPTTransuranic Waste Disposal

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
3.3.5.6.7 10CFR 71--Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive MaterialsPPTTransuranic Waste Disposal

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
U.S. NRC Part 71 Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material
3.3.5.6.8 regulatory guides applicable to power reactor radiological protection (such as RG 8.38, RG 8.13, RG 8.15)PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.5.7 Describe the organization and content of the corporate and plant health physics manuals (plant specific).
3.3.6 EXTERNAL DOSIMETRY Explain the principles of operation and methods of measuring external dose.
3.3.6.1 Describe the principles of operation and characteristics of the types of dosimetry used at the plant (thermo luminescent dosimeters, film badge, alarming dosimeters, pocket ion chamber, teledosimetry, (content added: optical-luminescent dosimeters), including the range(s) of each device, the effects of fading and drift, the advantages of each type of device, the limitations of each type of device, and radio frequency interference.PPTRadiographic Testing
3.3.6.2.1 responsibility for issue, collection, reading, and recording results
3.3.6.2.2 procedures for issuing dosimeters
3.3.6.2.3 procedure for collecting, reading, and recording results
3.3.6.2.4 quality control checks of dosimeters (plant specific)
3.3.6.3 Describe the plant calibration program for dosimetry. (plant specific)
3.3.6.4 Describe the types of dosimetry required for various work situations, (plant specific) such as entry into the restricted area; entry into the radiologically restricted area; entry into posted radiation areas, high radiation areas, or very high radiation areas; visitors; entry into areas with neutron radiation; entry into areas of non-uniform radiation fields; and planned special exposures. (Plant specific).
3.3.6.5 Describe the method and equipment used at the plant to determine doses from various types of radiation, including gamma whole-body dose, gamma extremity dose, beta skin dose, and neutron dose (plant specific).
3.3.6.6 Demonstrate the proper method for wearing dosimetry under various conditions, including determining the proper location of dosimetry.PPTPersonnel Monitoring
3.3.6.7 Read and re-zero self-reading dosimeters (pocket ion chambers, digital alarming dosimeter).PPTPersonnel Monitoring
3.3.6.8 Describe when a planned special exposure is allowed and the detailed requirements of the planned special exposure.PPTPersonnel Monitoring
KEEP
3.3.6.10 Explain the plant requirements for the use of extremity dosimetry, including conditions under which extremity dosimetry is required, (plant specific) administrative procedures for issuing and collecting extremity dosimetry, and types of extremity dosimeters (plant specific) .
3.3.6.11 Describe the plant criteria for performance of investigations of discrepancies in dosimetry readings (plant specific).
3.3.6.12 Explain actions to take in the event of abnormal situations (plant specific) such as:
3.3.6.12.1 lost thermoluminescent dosimeter, pocket ion chamber, or digital alarming dosimeter
3.3.6.12.2 damaged thermoluminescent dosimeter, pocket ion chambers, digital alarming dosimeter
3.3.6.12.3 off-scale pocket ion chambers or alarm on electronic dosimeter
3.3.6.12.4 exposure in excess of plant administrative limits or nuclear regulatory limits
3.3.6.12.5 significant difference between multiple dosimeter readings
3.3.6.13 Explain the purpose and procedures for processing NRC Form 4 and 5.PPTProtection Against Radiation
KEEP
3.3.6.14 Describe the plant exposure tracking system (plant specific)
3.3.7 INTERNAL DOSEMETRY Explain the principles of operation and methods for calculating internal dose.
3.3.7.1 Define these terms:
3.3.7.1.1 annual limit on intakePPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.1.2 derived air concentrationPPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.1.3 weighting factorsPPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.1.4 solubility classPPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.2 Explain how annual limit on intake, committed dose equivalent, committed effective dose equivalent, and the target organ relate to the appropriate derived air concentration.PPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.3 Identify the specific radionuclides of concern for assessment of internal exposures, including sources of nuclides (10FR20 appendix B), critical organ, and mode(s) of uptake and elimination (ICRP30 biokinetic models).PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.4 Identify derived air concentration values and calculate derived air concentration hours for practical situations that involve exposure of individuals to airborne radioactivity (10CFR20 Appendix B).PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTProtection Against Radiation

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys

PPTContinuous Air Monitor
3.3.7.5 Determine the total effective dose equivalent and total organ dose equivalent and explain the basis for each.PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.6 Identify the basic concepts of internal dosimetry and internal dose calculations. define biological half-life and effective half-lifePPTRadiographic Testing

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.6.1 describe (in general terms) the models used by International Commission on Radiation Protection to assess internal dose from ingestion and inhalationDOCInternational Commission on Radiological

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.7.6.2 estimate dose to internal organs from swallowing or breathing radioactivityPPTAir Sampling
PPT
PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys


PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.6.3 describe the causes of uncertainties in internal dose assessment calculationsPPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.7 Describe the means for assessing uptake of radioactivity (bioassays), including whole-body count, uninalysis, fecal analysis, nasal smears, and airborne radionuclide concentrations.PPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.8 Discuss the required frequency for performance of bioassays, including initial, periodic, allowing potential uptake, and on termination.PPTInternal Exposure Control
KEEP
3.3.7.9 Describe the plant requirements for recording and retaining bioassay results. (plant specific)
3.3.7.10 Demonstrate the proper operation of the whole-body counter and describe the interpretation of the results. (plant specific)
3.3.7.11 Describe the plant requirements for monitoring and reporting internal exposure. (plant specific)
3.3.7.12 Describe the plant requirements for performing a prospective evaluation of the need for internal monitoring. (plant specific)
3.3.8 EXTERNAL EXPOSURE CONTROL Explain the methods to minimize external exposure.
3.3.8.1 State the purpose of having plant administrative limits for radiation exposure (such as margin from regulatory limits).PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.8.2 Explain the differences between general area dose rate and contact dose rate and how each is used to control exposures.PPTRadiation Protection Postings

PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level
3.3.8.3 Define and state the posting requirements for the the controlled area, radiologically restricted area, radiation area, high radiation area, locked high radiation area, very high radiation area, and (plant specific) hot spots.PPTRadiation Protection Postings

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.8.4 Describe techniques for controlling individual exposures during radiological work, such as the use of pocket ion chambers or alarming dosimeters to allow workers to monitor dose received, assignment of stay times, use of radiation work permits (RWP), radiological protection technician job coverage (local or video monitor), use of low does waiting areas, and use of remote electronic dosimeters.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.8.5 Describe the access controls required for entry into each level of controlled area (as applicable) (plant specific) including the following:
3.3.8.5.1 radiation work permit requirements
3.3.8.5.2 dosimetry
3.3.8.5.3 notification to Radiological Protection Department
3.3.8.5.4 instrument or alarming dosimeter
3.3.8.5.5 locked barriers
3.3.8.5.6 warning signs and lights and key controls
3.3.8.6 Perform a radiation survey and (plant specific describe plant procedures) for performance of routine radiation surveys, including the frequency of surveys, instruments to be used, areas to be surveyed, survey techniques, and documentation of results.
3.3.8.7 Describe precautions and survey techniques for entering an area where radiation levels are unknown.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
KEEP
3.3.8.8 Describe plant procedures for controlling exposure to beta radiation (plant specific).
3.3.8.10 Explain how exposure goals can be used to reduce individual and collective exposures for specific radiological jobs, for work groups, and for the plant.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection
PPTRadiological Controls
PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.8.11 Explain the ALARA concept and how it is applied to radiological work at the plant (for example, time, distance, shielding, engineering controls and source reduction).PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRP Technician Training Engineering Controls
PPTProtection Against Radiation
PPTALARA for Engineers
KEEP
3.3.8.12 Identify the action levels and corresponding dose reduction steps taken based on estimated cumulative exposure (plant specific).
3.3.8.13 Describe the plant exposure reduction program for radiological work (plant specific), including the following:
3.3.8.13.1 ALARA review of proposed modifications
3.3.8.13.2 ALARA review of work packages
3.3.8.13.3 preparation of dose estimates
3.3.8.13.4 identification of dose reduction techniques
3.3.8.13.5 post-job review for lessons learned (plant specific)
3.3.8.14 Describe the concept of total risk as applied to prescription of radiological work controls.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.1 pre-job planning and preparationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.2 pre-job mock-up training for worker familiarityPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.3 review of procedures for workability and efficiencyPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.4 use of special tools to improve worker efficiencyPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.5 improvement of worker comfort by controlling environment (temperature, lighting, humidity, space)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.6 prefabrication of equipment in low-dose or no-dose areasPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.7 decontamination to reduce protective clothing requirementsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.19 Describe the consequences of removing permanent or temporary shielding without proper review and authorization.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls


PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.8.21 Discuss factors that determine the ultimate effectiveness of installing temporary shielding, such as the cost of installation (dollars and person-rem) versus benefit, physical space limitations, 10CFR50.59 review constraints, floor loading constraints, and pipe and pipe hanger load constraints.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Programs
PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry
PPT
PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.8.22 Evaluate the effectiveness of temporary shielding in various practical applications.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
PPT
PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.8.23.1 decontamination of major system componentsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.23.2 flushing hot spotsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.23.3 sequencing work so high dose rate items are removed from the work area early onPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.23.4 reduction of cobalt in system componentsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.8.23.5 enhanced filtration of reactor coolantPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTChemistry and Radcon
3.3.8.23.6 early boration (PWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.23.7 hydrogen peroxide (PWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.23.8 lithium control (PWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTChemistry and Radcon
3.3.8.23.9 soft shutdown (BWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.24 Describe components that contribute to cobalt inventory in the reactor coolant (stellite valve seats, pump bearings).PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTALARA for Engineers
KEEP
3.3.9 CONTAMINATION CONTROL Explain and apply concepts related to contamination control.
3.3.9.1 State the plant limits for radioactive contamination for release of materials, equipment, and areas for unrestricted use. (plant specific)
3.3.9.2 State the plant limit (alarm setpoint) for radioactive contamination on personnel. (plant specific)
3.3.9.3 Define and state the posting requirements for contaminated areas. (plant specific)
3.3.9.4 Describe plant procedures for marking and packaging radioactivity contaminated materials. (plant specific)
3.3.9.5 Explain the difference between loose and fixed contamination.PPTRadiation Protection Postings

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTContamination Control


DOCContamination Control Lesson Plan

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.9.6 Discuss the reason for having lower limits for alpha contamination.PPTRadiation Protection Postings

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPTAir Sampling
PPT
PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
3.3.9.7 Identify potential sources of radioactive contamination, including work operations that can generate contamination.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.9.8 Describe techniques for controlling the spread of contamination to personnel and equipment, including the following:
3.3.9.8.1 use of protective clothingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control


PPTContamination Control_Lesson Plan

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTProtection Against Radiation

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.9.8.2 packaging of contaminated materialsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
3.3.9.8.3 use of containment devicesPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
3.3.9.8.4 control of leaks from radioactive systemsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
3.3.9.8.5 decontaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

DOCContamination Control Lesson Plan


PPTRadiological Safety & Response

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
KEEP
3.3.9.9 Describe plant requirements for monitoring personnel for radioactive contamination when leaving contaminated areas, hot particle areas, the radiologically restricted area, and the plant. (plant specific)
3.3.9.10 Describe plant requirements for monitoring tools and equipment for radioactive contamination when leaving the radiologically restricted area, for unrestricted use in the radiologically restricted area, for storeage or reuse within the radioloigally restricted area, and for release from the plant (plant specific).
3.3.9.11 Perform an area contamination survey, and (plant specificdescribe plant procedures for performing routine area contamination surveys), including, including (plant specific frequency of surveys), instruments to be used, areas to be surveyed, survey techniques, and (plant spedific documentation of results.)
3.3.9.12 Describe plant procedures for performing special contamination surveys (plant specific), including radioactive particles on personnel or equipment; radioactive particles in areas; small volumes of liquid leaving the radiologically controlled area; and loose material, such as sand, leaving the raiologically controlled area (Plant specific)
3.3.9.13 Discuss the normal uses, (plant specific locations), advantages, disadvantages, and relative sensitivity of the following contamination detection devices
3.3.9.13.1 bag counters
3.3.9.13.2 conveyor-type contamination monitors
3.3.9.13.3 portable frisker
3.3.9.13.4 portal monitor
3.3.9.13.5 tool monitors
3.3.9.13.6 whole-body contamination monitor
3.3.9.14 Describe plant procedures for controlling hot particles (plant specific)
3.3.9.15 Define a full set of protective clothing under normal circumstances (plant specific)
3.3.9.16 Describe other types of protective clothing available, including conditions under which each is used, procedures for donning and removing protective clothing and inspections of clothing prior to usePPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan


PPT Protection Against Radiation
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.9.17 Describe the devices used for containment of contamination during radiological work, such as drapes, glove bags, tents, drain bottles, berms, absorbents to contain liquid and catch containmentsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

PPT Radiological Safety & Response


PPTALARA for Engineer

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.9.18 Describe methods used to protect against facial contamination such as face shield, ski-mask and specially designed hoodsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.9.19 Identify the conditions in which the use of each type of containment device is to be consideredPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

3.3.9.20 Explain the inspections that are to be performed prior to the use of containment devicesPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


3.3.9.21 Describe techniques to minimize the spread of contamination, including protective clothing requirements and precautions during use, removal of contaminated equipment, and postjob removal or decontamination of the containment device.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTProtection Against Radiation
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.9.22 Identify methods by which a work site can be prepared for the performance of highly contaminated work such as using disposable plastic; covering the work area with launderable, reusable sheeting; covering the work area with strippable paint; and painting concrete surfaces for ease in decontamination.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


3.3.9.23 Define cross-contamination and describe how it can result in the uncontrolled spread of contaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


3.3.9.24 Describe techniques to minimize the spread of contamination when contaminated materials are brought out of posted areasPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

3.3.9.25 Describe the purpose and use of a stepoff pad in controlling the spread of contaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPT Radiological Safety & Response
3.3.9.26 Discuss the generic plant requirements for entering and working in areas with contamination above plant limits, such as radiation work permits, protective clothing, use of tools for a hot tool room, step off pads, and notification of the Radiological Protection Department.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTProtection Against Radiation
KEEP
3.3.10 AIRBORNE RADIOACTIVITY CONTROL Explain the methods to control airborne radioactivity.
3.3.10.1 Identify the isotopes of primary concern for airborne radioactivity at the plant (such as H3, Co-58, C0-60, CS-134, CS-137, I-131).PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.10.2 Describe the procedures for posting areas as airborne radioactivity areas. (10CFR20)PPTRadiation Protection Postings

PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry
3.3.10.3 Explain the characteristic difference between particulate, iodine, tritium, and noble gases and how they affect the method of detecting and controlling airborne radioactivity.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.10.4 Collect airborne samples, and describe plant procedures for collecting routine airborne radioactivity samples, including the frequency of surveys, types of surveys performed (particulate, iodine, noble gas, tritium), instruments to be used, areas to be sampled, sampling techniques, and documentation of results. (plant specific)
3.3.10.5 Describe the procedure for determining the derived air concentration, derived air concentration hours, and annual limit on intake for a worker in an airborne radioactivity area.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTAir Sampling

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
3.3.10.6 Explain the difference between low-volume, high volume, and lapel air samples, including when each is used.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTAir Sampling

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
3.3.10.7 Discuss the purpose of using a continuous air monitor and identify situations in which continuous air monitors should be used.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program
3.3.10.8 Evaluate trends in airborne radioactivity based on sampling results.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program
3.3.10.9 Identify work situations and work practices that could produce airborne radioactivity, such as opening a contaminated system; working in highly contaminated areas; grinding, cutting or welding radioactive or contaminated materials; and leaks from contaminated systems.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls


PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.10.10 Describe controls that can be used to reduce exposure to airborne radioactivity, such as the use of filtered ventilation, decontamination of areas or equipment to eliminate the source of airborne radioactivity, use of containment devices (such as tents, glove bags), and repair of leaks in contaminated systems, the performance of work under water or keeping contaminated materials wet, and use of a respirator (last resort).PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRP Technician Training Engineering Controls


PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.10.11 Identify the primary ventilation and filtration systems in the plant. (plant specific)
3.3.10.12 Identify plant requirements that must be met before an individual is issued a respirator such as training the individual in the proper use of equipment, medical evaluation, and quantitative fit test.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.10.13 Define protection factor (10CFR20).PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills


PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTProtection Against Radiation
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
KEEP
3.3.10.14 Identify the protection factors, advantages, and disadvantages of each type of respirator used in radiological applications at the station.
3.3.10.14.1 full-face negative pressure respiratorPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection



PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.10.14.2 full-face positive pressure respiratorPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection



PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.10.14.3 full-face air line respiratorPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.10.14.4 air line (bubble) hood respiratorPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.10.14.5 self-contained breathing apparatusPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection
PPT
Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.10.15 Describe the conditions under which each type of respiratory protection equipment must be used.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.10.16 Describe plant procedures for issue and control of respiratory protection equipment. (plant specific)
3.3.10.17 Demonstrate proper procedure for donning and removing each type of respiratory protection equipment used at the station. (plant specific)
3.3.10.18 Discuss the difference between paper filters and charcoal filters and when each is used.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.10.19 Discuss plant procedures for tracking exposure to airborne radioactivity, including levels at which tracking is required, sampling requirements, use of protection factors, documentation of exposures, timekeeping, and reporting and summing exposures. (Plant Specific)
3.3.10.20 Discuss plant requirements for entering and working in airborne radioactivity areas (plant specific), such as radiation work permit, respiratory protection equipment, and notification of the Radiological Protection Department. (Plant specific).
3.3.11 CONDUCT AND MONITORING OF RADIOLOGICAL WORK Perform and/or monitor radiological work operations.
3.3.11.1 Perform and/or monitor work in radiation areas, high radiation areas, and very high radiation areas (plant specific)
3.3.11.2 Perform and/or monitor work in areas where the potential exists for rapidly changing dose rates (plant specific), such as the spent fuel pool, during incore detector evolutions, and during radiography. (Plant specific)
3.3.11.3 Perform and/or monitor work in contaminated areas (plant specific)
3.3.11.4 Perform and/or monitor the opening of contaminated systems (plant specific)
3.3.11.5 Perform and/or monitor work in areas with airborne radioactivity or the potential for airborne radioactivity (plant specific)
3.3.11.6 Perform and/or monitor work in areas with high dose gradients (plant specific)
3.3.11.7 Describe the methods that can be used to invoke radiological protection requirements such as steps in written procedures, radiation work permits, verbal instructions from the supervisor, and verbal instructions from radiological protection personnel.:PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.11.8 Explain the responsibilities of the following personnel regarding specifying, complying with, monitoring and enforcing radiological protection and ALARA requirements:
3.3.11.8.1 workersPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.11.8.3 radiological protection technicianPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.11.8.4 radiological protection technician supervisorPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.11.9 Explain the purpose of using radiation work permits (RWPs).PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.11.10 Identify plant requirements for radiation work permits use. (plant specific)
3.3.11.11 Describe plant procedures for requesting, initiating, completing, modifying, approving, and terminating a radiation work permit. (plant specific)
3.3.11.12 Explain the difference between standing and job-specific radiation work permits and when each is used.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills


PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.11.13 Identify the information to be included on radiation work permits, such as the following:
3.3.11.13.1 scope of work covered by the RWPPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills



PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.10 radiological protection coverage and notification requirementsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills


PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.11 special precautions, restrictions, or limitationsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills


PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.2 radiation, contamination, and airborne radioactivity levelsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.3 internal and external dose action levelsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.4 location of hot spotsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.5 personnel authorized to use the RWPPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.6 dosimetry requirementsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.7 respiratory protection requirementsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.13.8 protective clothing requirementsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls


PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.11.13.9 period during which the RWP is validPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.11.14 Describe the administrative process of signing in on an RWP. (plant specific)
3.3.11.15 Explain the purpose of having each worker read and sign the RWP.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.16 Demonstrate actions that should be taken if radiological conditions at the job site are significantly different from those shown on the RWP.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.11.17 Identify areas in the plant that require specific manager approval for entry because of extreme radiological conditions. (plant specific)
3.3.11.18 Explain actions to be taken if the work scope or work location changes from that listed on the RWP.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.19 Explain why technicians have stop-work authority and identify types of situations in which this authority is to be implemented.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.11.20 Identify the pre-job radiological survey requirements for the work operation to be performed. Based on the results of the pre-job surveys and the scope of work, identify or evaluate the need for the following:
3.3.11.20.1 a formal ALARA reviewPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls


PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.11.20.2 pre-job briefings with workersPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.20.3 type and location of whole-body dosimeters, multiple whole-body dosimeters, extremity dosimetersPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.20.4 protective clothing requirementsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation

3.3.11.20.5 respiratory protection requirementsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.20.6 special precautions or conditions to minimize the spread of contamination, reduce exposure, or minimize airborne contaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.20.8 In-process radiological surveys to be performedPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.20.9 radiological hold pointsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.11.21 Discuss plant procedures for selecting jobs for formal ALARA reviews. (plant specific)
3.3.11.22 Describe how the results of ALARA reviews are implemented (plant specific), including the documentation required, mandatory versus suggested techniques, technician and worker authority and procedure for modifying requirements, and responsibility for implementation. (Plant specific):
3.3.11.23 Discuss generic plant procedures for conducting pre-job briefings for radiological work, including when briefings are required, the frequency of briefings for continuing jobs, personnel required to attend briefings, items to be discussed in briefings, and the importance of resolving all questions in briefings.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

3.3.11.24 Explain how the type and location of whole-body dosimetry is determined for body position and dose rate gradient.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.25 Identify the criteria used to determine the need for multiple badging or for extremity monitoring.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.26 Identify measures to take when protective clothing is used in conditions that could result in heat stress.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.27 Identify and explain factors that determine the need for and type of protective clothing to be used during radiological work such as level of contamination, position of the workers, presence of airborne radioactivity, presence of liquid, type of work being performed, environmental conditions, and total risk concept.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.11.28 Identify and explain factors that determine the need for and type of respiratory equipment to be used during radiological work, such as the following:
3.3.11.28.1 levels of airborne radioactivityPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.2 type of airborne radioactivity (particulate versus gas)PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.3 levels of contamination in the work areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.4 whether work area is wet or dryPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.5 protection factor of the respiratory protection equipmentPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.6 duration of the jobPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.7 type of work being performed (welding, grinding, cutting)PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.8 impact of decreased worker efficiency due to respirator use resulting in increased whole-body dosePPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.9 applicability of portable ventilation in lieu of respirator usePPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRP Technician Training Engineering Controls
3.3.11.29 Describe special precautions that should be used when practical to control or reduce exposures during certain radiological conditions, such as assignment of stay times and timekeepers, continuous radiological protection technician coverage, use of alarming dosimeters or dose rate meters, use of temporary shielding, availability of low dose rate waiting areas, and removal of high dose rate sources.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.11.30 Describe precautions to be used when practical to control spread of radioactive contamination during radiological work, such as the use of containment devices, special protective clothing requirements, and the use of disposable coverings during job-site preparation.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.31 Describe precautions to be used, when practical, to control airborne radioactivity, such as special ventilation, containment devices, and work areas decontamination, as well as performing work under water or dampening the work area.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRP Technician Training Engineering Control
3.3.11.32 Evaluate the use of temporary shielding for specific job applications.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTALARA for Engineers
KEEP
3.3.11.33 Discuss the conditions under which each of the following is to be invoked during radiological work.
3.3.11.33.1 continuous radiological protection (RP) technician coveragePPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.33.2 intermittent RP technician coveragePPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

3.3.11.33.3 RP technician present at start of jobPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.33.4 no RP technician coveragePPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.33.5 advanced radiation worker coveragePPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.34 Describe the in-process radiological surveys that should be performed under various radiological conditions, including radiation surveys, contamination surveys, and airborne radioactivity surveys.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

DOCRadiation Detection Principles

PPTRadiological Controls

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
KEEP
3.3.11.35 Describe plant requirements for documentation of in-process radiological surveys. (plant specific)
3.3.11.36 Identify generic locations that should be included in process radiation surveys, such as component being worked on, nearby piping and components, location where workers are positioned, path to and from the work site, low dose areas, hot spots, and potentially transient dose rate areas (resin lines, drain lines, movement of sources).PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTGaseous Radwaste

DOC Chemical and Oily Waste Water
KEEP
3.3.11.37 Discuss plant procedures for conducting in-progress airborne radioactivity samples, including when samples are to be taken, and define the following: breathing xone and the appropriate breathing zone for varous work situations, the method of sampling (for example, low volume, high volume, lapel, or continuous air monitor), the type of sampling (for example, particulate, iodine, noble gas, or trituim), and the documentation of the results (plant specific).
3.3.11.38 Explain actions that should be taken if surveys show radiological conditions significantly different from expected, such as high contact dose rates, high general area dose rates, unexpected low dose rates, high beta dose rates, very high contamination levels, very high airborne radioactivity, and unexpected lack of airborne radioactivity.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.11.39 Discuss plant access control procedures for entry into the following for performance of work:
3.3.11.39.1 controlled areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.39.2 radiological restricted areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.39.3 restricted areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.39.4 radiation areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.39.5 high radiation areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.39.6 very high radiation areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.39.7 contaminated areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.11.39.8 airborne radioactivity area (plant specific)
3.3.11.40 Describe actions required when leaving a work site upon completion of radiological work, such as packaging, marking, and transferring contaminated tools, equipment, and trash; removing protective clothing; monitoring for contamination; returning special dosimetry; signing out of the RWP; and notifying radiological protection personnel of job completion.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.11.41 Discuss proper job coverage and radiological protection measures for high exposure jobs and potential high exposure jobs, such as:
3.3.11.41.1 steam generator maintenance (PWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.2 reactor coolant pump seal replacement (PWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

DOC Primary Systems
3.3.11.41.3 reactor water cleanup pump maintenance (BWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.4 recirculation pump seal replacement (BWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.5 reactor internal pump maintenance (ABWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.41.6 control rod drive maintenance (BWR and ABWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.7 diving operationsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.8 spent resin transfer operationsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.9 spent fuel movementsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.10 in-core detector maintenancePPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.11 work in or around spent fuel poolPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.42 Demonstrate the interpersonal and human relations skills that are used to perform job coverage effectively in conditions such as the following: main control point, satellite control point, job coverage during worker performance problems, and exit point control.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.12 RADIOLOGICAL INCIDENT EVALUATION AND CONTROL Explain the recognition of and appropriate responses to radiological events.
3.3.12.1 Describe, in general terms, the expected response to radiological incidents, including precedence given to treating injuries, mitigation and minimization of exposure to plant personnel and the public, mitigation and minimization of damage to equipment, and notification of appropriate personnel.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTProtection Against Radiation
KEEP
3.3.12.2 Discuss the role of various plant personnel in responding to radiological incidents (plant specific), including personnel directly involved in the incident and immediately affected by it (regardless of work group), other personnel nearby but not affected, control room personnel, radiological protection technicians, radiological protection supervisors, fire brigade, auxiliary operators, and plant managers. (Plant specific).
3.3.12.3 Identify the radiological consequence that may result from various incidents, such as a sudden increase in dose rate, the uncontrolled spread of contamination, a leak or spill of contaminated liquid, an injury to an individual performing radiological work, a fire in the radiologically restricted area, the loss of a high-activity radiation source, a degraded core, and uncontrolled or unsecured high radiation areas.:PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTFire Detection & Protection System
KEEP
3.3.12.4 Describe how to estimate beta and gamma dose rates from the following:
3.3.12.4.1 contamination on floorPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.4.2 airborne radioactivity (particulate, iodines, noble gases and tritium)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.4.3 pipes or tanks that contain radioactive liquidsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.12.5 Describe how to estimate skin dose resulting from skin contamination including hot particles.PPTRadiological Safety & Response

DOCSkin Dose
3.3.12.6 Identify isotopes expected to be present in the event of a radiological incident.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.12.8 Estimate activity released during an incident using the following:
3.3.12.8.1 airborne activity levels in a plumePPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program


PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.8.2 contamination levels and extent of area contaminatedPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.8.3 gaseous/particulate specific activity and volume releasedPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.8.4 liquid specific activity and volume releasedPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.8.5 pre-release and post-release radiation surveys (for example, pipe, valves, tanks)PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.12.10 Identify the immediate actions to be taken to control and minimize the extent of radiological incidents such as the following:
3.3.12.10.1 alarm on electronic dosimeterPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.2 area radiation monitor alarmPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.3 contaminated injured personnelPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.4 contaminated personnelPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.5 continuous air monitor alarmPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.6 fire in the radiologically controlled areaPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.7 off-scale pocket dosimeterPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.8 contaminated liquid or resin spillPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.9 dry contaminated material spillPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.10 unmonitored release of radioactivity to the environmentPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.11 Evaluate radiological incidents to identify the scope and cause.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.12 Identify follow-up actions to correct the causes of the incidents.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.13 Identify radiological surveys that should be taken as a result of an incident and the purpose of each.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.14 Describe how to locate and track a radioactive plume.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
KEEP
3.3.12.15 Describe the plant procedure for documenting radiological incidents (plant specific), such as radiological incident reports, personnel contamination reports, and operating incident reports.
3.3.12.16 Explain the importance of using trending to identify causes of individual incidents and common causes of incidents.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.12.17 Describe the types of incidents required to be documented. (plant specific)
3.3.12.18 Discuss how reports of incidents at other plants can be useful in preventing similar incidents at another plant.DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Programs

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response



PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.12.19 Describe recent significant radiological incidents at this plant or at other nuclear power plants.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.12.20 Discuss the plant emergency response plan (plant specific), including the responsibilities of various work groups, personnel accountability, emergency operations center organization, on-site and off-site radiological emergency response, and protective action guidelines for the public. (Plant specific) and
3.3.12.21 Identify the location and contents of emergency equipment kits. (plant specific)
3.3.12.22 Discuss emergency dose limits for life-saving or control of plant safety.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.13 DECONTAMINATION Explain and apply the concepts related to decontamination.
3.3.13.1 Describe the total risk concept as it applies to contamination control.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

KEEP
3.3.13.2 Describe the plant practices on when and why plant areas should be decontaminated. (plant specific)
3.3.13.3 Explain the differences between fixed and removable contamination and the resulting differences in techniques used for decontamination.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
KEEP
3.3.13.4 Identify personnel who should be notified of personnel contaminations. (plant specific)
3.3.13.5 Describe plant procedures for handling personnel shoe or clothing contamination (plant specific), including documenations required, docontamination methods, and disposition of articles that cannot be decontaminated. (Plant specific)
3.3.13.6 Describe the procedure to be followed when an individual is contaminated, including performing a contamination survey (whole-body) by radiological protection personnel; recording contamination levels, location, date, and time on personnel contamination report; (Plant specific) direct decontamination of areas above the plant limit; identifying when nasal smears and/or a whole-body count are required; documenting the final results of decontamination; and interviewing the individual to identify the source of contamination.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

DOCSpills and Contamination Events

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.13.7 Explain the importance of tracking and trending personnel contaminations.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.13.8 Select the appropriate personnel decontamination techniques for various levels of contamination and the degree to which contamination is fixed.
3.3.13.8.1 removing particles with tapePPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.8.2 scrubbing gently with soft brushPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.8.3 shaving contaminated hairPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.8.4 sweating and chemical decontaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.8.5 washing with lukewarm water and mild detergentPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.9 Explain why hot water, cold water and abrasive cleaners are not used for personnel decontamination:PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.13.10 Identify conditions in which skin dose calculations should be performed as a result of skin contamination.PPTPersonnel Monitoring

DOCSkin Dose
3.3.13.11 Describe why some areas of the plant should not be decontaminated, such as filter galleries, high radiation areas, and hallways between contaminated areas frequently traveled by operations personnel.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.12 Identify situations in which personnel decontamination is to be referred to other appropriate personnel: contaminated wounds; contaminated eyes, ears, nose, or throat; and contamination that cannot be removed through the use of approved techniques.PPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTRadcon Emergency Response
3.3.13.13 Describe special procedures for decontamination of radioiodines.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Responsee
KEEP
3.3.13.14 Discuss additional actions or notifications required if an injured person is contaminated. (plant specific)
3.3.13.15 Identify techniques available for decontamination of tools and equipment, including advantages, disadvantages, and limitations of each.
3.3.13.15.1 carbon dioxide pellet blastingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.2 chemical decontaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.3 electropolishingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection
3.3.13.15.4 grit blastingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.5 high pressure water blastingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.6 ice pellet blastingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.7 low pressure water blastingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.8 mechanical removal (grinding, machining, filing)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.9 spray washPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.10 steam cleaningPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.11 ultrasonic cleaningPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.12 use of strippable coatingsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.13 wiping with lint free cloth or oil-impregnated wipesPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.14 washing in non-ionic detergentPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
KRRP
3.3.13.16 Describe plant requirements for monitoring decontaminated equipment prior to release. (plant specific)
3.3.13.17 Discuss procedures for disposal of materials that cannot be decontaminated successfully. (plant specific)
3.3.13.18 Discuss procedures for disposal of materials used in the decontamination process, such as rags, cloths, oil-impregnated wipes, detergent solutions, and chemicals. (plant specific)
KEEP
3.3.13.19 Describe methods used for decontamination of areas within the plant, such as mopping, using oil-impregnated wipes (masslin), wiping with damp rags, vacuuming, and scrubbing with brushes.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response


DOC Spills and Contamination Events
KEEP
3.3.13.20 Identify the protective clothing requirements for area decontamination. (plant specific)
3.3.13.21 Explain why area decontamination should begin at areas of lowest contamination levels and progress toward areas of high levels.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.13.22 Discuss plant requirements for conducting and documenting post-decontamination surveys. (plant specific)
3.3.13.23 Identify special precautions associated with disposal of materials used in decontamination, such as wet mop heads, liquids that contain detergents, vacuum cleaner dust, and mixed waste.DOC Spills and Contamination Events
KEEP
3.3.13.24 Describe plant radiological protection requirements for decontaminating used protective clothing. (plant specific)
3.3.13.25 Describe plant radiological protection requirements for decontaminating used respiratory protective devices. (plant specific)
3.3.14 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL CONTROL Explain and apply concepts related to radioactive material control.
3.3.14.1 Identify the packaging, marking, and labeling requirements for radioactive materials stored on site. (plant specific)
3.3.14.2 Identify NRC-licensed radioactive materials that require special controls, and discuss the controls required.DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability

PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

3.3.14.3 Describe the approval and posting requirements for radioactive material areas and radioactive material storage areas.DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability

PPTRadiation Protection Postings


PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.14.4 Describe plant procedures for storing and retrieving radioactive materials. (plant specific)
3.3.14.5 Identify special precautions and restrictions for storing radioactive materials outdoors.DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability
KEEP
3.3.14.6 Discuss plant procedures for preventing the loss of radioactive materials. (plant specific)
3.3.14.7 Describe the controls over radioactive effluent releases, including the following:
3.3.14.7.1 normal liquid and gaseous radioactivity release pathsPPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPT Gaseous Radwaste

3.3.14.7.2 radiation monitors used to detect and measure releasesPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability
3.3.14.7.3 procedural controls and records associated with releasesPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills


DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability
3.3.14.7.4 off-site dose calculations for releasesPPTAir Sampling

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
3.3.14.7.5 use of derived air concentration and technical specification limitsPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills
PPTAir Sampling

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
3.3.14.7.6 notifications and actions required for abnormal releasesPPTPersonnel Monitoring
3.3.14.7.7 radiological environmental technical specificationsPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program
3.3.14.7.8 off-site dose calculation limits and requirements (plant specific)DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability
KEEP
3.3.14.8 Identify regulations and procedures for shipping and receiving radioactive materials.
3.3.14.9 Define the following terms related to shipping radioactive materials: (49CFR172+3) type A, type B, low specific activity, radioactive white I, yellow II, and yellow III labels, highway route controlled quantity, limited quantity, exempt quantity, special form, and normal form.PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Safety & Response


DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability
3.3.14.10 Discuss regulatory limits for radiation levels and contamination levels for packages and vehicles while in transit. (49CFR172+3)PPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability
KEEP
3.3.14.11 Describe plant procedures for shipping and receiving radioactive material shipments. (plant specific)
3.3.14.12 Discuss burial site requirements and criteria (plant specific) including those for liquids; oils; class A (stable and unstable), class B and class C wastes; not generally acceptable; and high-integrity containers. (Plant specific)
3.3.14.13 Describe on-site radioactive waste storage capabilities. (plant specific)
3.3.14.14 Describe local radioactive waste disposal compact, applicable states, siting location schedule and approximate cost for disposal. (plant specific)
3.3.14.15 Describe plant systems for storing and processing radioactive liquid waste, and the (Plant specific) location of storage tanks, filters, demineralizers, evaporators, and solidification equipment.
3.3.14.16 Explain the radiological protection requirements associated with processing liquid wastes using techniques such as operation of evaporators, solidification of evaporate bottoms, transfer of demineralizer resin to shipping casks, and dewatering and solidification of resins.PPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTChemistry and Radcon


PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.14.17 Describe the plant procedure for sorting solid waste to remove materials (plant specific) such as noncontaminated waste, reusable materials (tools, protective clothing, respirators), liquids, and prohibited materials. (Plant specific)
3.3.14.18 Describe the radiological protection requirements associated with sorting and segregating radioactive waste. (plant specific)
3.3.14.19 Describe radiological protection requirements for operating a radioactive waste compactor.PPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.14.20 Identify and explain techniques for reducing the volume of radioactive solid waste generated, such as the following:
3.3.14.20.1 minimizing the amount of material entering the radiologically restricted areaPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.14.20.2 decontaminationPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.14.20.3 segregating non-radioactive wastePPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills


PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.14.20.4 reusing cloth rags, shoe covers, bags, protective clothingPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPT Radiological Safety & Response

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.14.20.5 wrapping clean equipment to prevent its contaminationPPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.14.20.6 compactionPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills
3.3.14.20.7 using a hot tool roomPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills
3.3.14.20.8 removing packing materials outside the radiologically restricted areaPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills
keep
3.3.14.21 Describe the flow path for off-site waste processing and burial. (plant specific)
3.3.15 ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING eExplain the purpose, process, and specifics of environmental monitoring.
3.3.15.1 Explain the purpose of the plant environmental monitoring program.PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

DOCEnvironmental Sample Counting Using Proportional Counters
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.15.2 Describe the methods used to conduct environmental monitoring, such as posting themoluminescent dosimeters off-site and sampling air, vegetation, aquatic life, water, soil, and milk.PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

DOCEnvironmental Sample Counting Using Proportional Counters
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
KEEP
3.3.15.3 Describe the limits and action levels associated with environmental monitoring. (plant specific)
3.3.15.4 Describe actions to be taken if unexpected radioactivity is detected in environmental samples. (plant specific)
3.3.15.5 Identify the major pathways of concern in performing off-site dose calculations.PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program
KEEP
3.3.15.6 Describe periodic reporting requirements for environmental monitoring data. (plant specific)
3.3.16 SPECIALIZED SKILLS: PLANT SPECIFIC Perform specialized skills as identified by the plant.
3.3.16.1 Perform calibrations of radiation detection and sampling equipment
3.3.16.2 Operate the whole-body counter and interpret the results
3.3.16.3 Read and interpret whole-body dosimetry results
3.3.16.4 Operate counting room equipment such as multichannel analyzers and automatic smear counters
3.3.16.5 Test respirator fit and clean respirator
3.3.16.6 Test respirator filter cartridge
4.0 DISCIPLINE SPECIFIC CURRICULUM FOR CHEMISTRY TECHNICIANS
4.1 COMPUTERS (PLANT SPECIFIC) Explain the basic operation and application of computers

Chemistry Technicians

ACADsGP Strategies Matrix
Lesson - Chapter - Objectives
Gap materials from RCNET & Academic PartnersTextbooks & Other Published MaterialsWeb - based
Resources
4.0 DISCIPLINE SPECIFIC CURRICULUM FOR CHEMISTRY TECHNICIANS
4.1 COMPUTERS (PLANT SPECIFIC) Explain the basic operation and application of computers
4.1.1 Explain the functions and capabilities of the plant computer
4.1.2 Explain and apply the functions and capabilities of Chemistry Department computers such as the trending of chemistry data
4.1.3 Operate chemistry software programs
4.1.4 Use the computer for trending chemistry data
4.2 SYSTEMS Perform specified functions on plant systems relative to the chemistry technician job.
4.2.1 Describe the effects of chemistry changes on each system and plant operation (plant specific)
4.2.2 Explain the purpose and location of major components and equipment (plant specific)
4.2.3 Identify chemicals added to the system (plant specific)
4.2.4 Explain the basic principles of operation for the system and major components and equipmentPPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTNuclear Plant Systems


DOCPrimary Systems
4.2.5 Identify chemistry limits and on-line monitoring requirements (plant specific)
4.2.6 Explain chemistry concerns associated with the system (plant specific)
4.2.7 Identify chemistry sampling points
4.2.7.1 auxiliary feedwater (PWR)PPTPWR Systems

DOCAuxiliary Feedwater System


PPTAuxiliary Feedwater System Powerpoint
4.2.7.2 borated refueling water storage tank (PWR)DOCPrimary Systems

PPTChemistry and Radcon
4.2.7.3 chemical and volume control (PWR)PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTPWR Systems
4.2.7.4 circulating waterPPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems

4.2.7.5 condensatePPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems

PPTOverview of Nuclear Plant Systems

PPTCondensate and Feedwater Systems Instructor Notes
4.2.7.6 condensate polishersPPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTWater Treatment

PPTDOC Chemical and Oily Waste Water
4.2.7.7 condenser air removalPPTCooling Towers and Air Cooled /a>
4.2.7.8 containmentPPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System
4.2.7.9 control rod drivePPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System

DOCReactor Coolant System Instructor Notes
4.2.7.10 demineralized waterPPTChemistry and Radcon
4.2.7.11 emergency core coolingPPTPWR Systems
4.2.7.12 emergency diesel generatorsPPTPWR Systems
4.2.7.13 emergency powerPPTPWR Systems
4.2.7.14 feedwaterPPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems

PPTOverview of Nuclear Plant Systems s

PPTCondensate and Feedwater Systems Instructor Notes

PPTDigital Feedwater Control Systems

PDFDigital Feedwater Control Systems

PPTDigital Feedwater Control Systems
4.2.7.15 feedwater heaters and extraction drainsPPTExtraction Steam


PPTGaseous Radwaste

DOC Extraction Steam and Heater Drain Instructor Notes
4.2.7.16 high pressure coolant injection (BWR)PPTChemistry and Radcon
4.2.7.17 high pressure core spray (BWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor System
4.2.7.18 low pressure core spray (BWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor System
4.2.7.19 main generatorPPTNuclear Plant Systems
4.2.7.20 main steamPPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTPlant Status


PPTMain Steam System

PPTMain Steam Instructor Notes
4.2.7.21 main turbinePPTPWR Systems
4.2.7.22 offgas (BWR)PPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System
4.2.7.23 post accident samplingPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTPost Accident Sampling
4.2.7.24 pressurizer (PWR)PPTPWR Systems

PPTOverview of Nuclear Plant Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System
4.2.7.25 pressurizer relief (PWR)PPTPWR Systems
4.2.7.26 radiation monitoringPPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Programs

PPTPrimary Water Chemistry
4.2.7.27 reactor coolantPPTPlant Chemistry


PPTChemistry and Radcon

DOC Primary Systems


DOCReactor Coolant System Instructor Notes
4.2.7.28 reactor core isolation cooling (BWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor System
4.2.7.29 reactor water cleanup (BWR)PPTPWR Systems
4.2.7.30 reactor water makeupPPTBoiling Water Reactor System
4.2.7.31 recirculation (BWR)PPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System
4.2.7.32 residual heat removal/shutdown coolingNS-08-7, 8
NS-04-6, 7  
4.2.7.33 safety injectionPPTPlant Status

PPTMain Steam System

PPTMain Steam Instructor Notes
4.2.7.34 safely injection accumulatorsPPTMain Steam System

PPTMain Steam Instructor Notes
4.2.7.35 standby liquid control (BWR)PPTNuclear Plant Systems
4.2.7.36 steam generator (PWR)PPTNuclear Plant Systems

PPTPWR Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System
Plant Specific - included plant internship Training
• Auxiliary shutdown panel
• Auxiliary steam
• Chemical storage and handling
• Chilled water
• Communications
• Component cooling water
• Compressed gas/air
• Condensate storage and transfer
• Containment cooling
• Containment iodine removal
• Containment isolation
• Containment pressure relief
• Containment purge
• Containment spray
• Control rod drive hydraulics (BWR)
• Cranes/hoists/elevators
• Electrical distribution
• Electrohydraulic control oil
• Emergency service water
• Fire protection
• Floor and equipment drains
• Fuel handling equipment
• Fuel pool cooling
• Gaseous radwaste
• Generator cooling
• Generator exciter
• Generator hydrogen supply
• Hydrogen recombiner and purge
• Hydrogen seal oil
• Instrument air
• Isolated phase bus duct cooling
• Liquid radwaste
• Liquid and solid
• Lube oil purification systems
• Main turbine lube oil
• Mechanical/natural draft cooling towers
• Neutron instrumentation
• Penetration cooling
• Plant heating
• Plant ventilation
• Radwaste
• Reactor building closed cooling water (BWR)
• Reactor protection
• Reheat steam
• Safety relief (BWR)
• Seismic instrumentation
• Service air
• Service water
• Standby gas treatment (BWR)
• Station air
• Stator water cooling system
• Steam seal supply
• Steam generator blowdown recovery (PWR)
• Suppression pool (BWR)
• Suppression pool makeup
• Switchyard
• Turbine building closed cooling
• Vital batteries
• Waste gas decay (PWR)
• Waste treatments (oil, sanitary, water discharges and chemical)
• Water treatment
• Other systems unique to the specific plant
4.3 GENERAL TOOLS AND TEST EQUIPMENT (PLANT SPECIFIC) perform the specified tasks for general tools and test equipment.
4.3.1 Explain procedures to check out and return radioactively contaminated tools and test equipment
4.3.2 Identify tools and test equipment that may need specific controls before being taken into radiologically controlled environments
4.3.3 Identify power sources that may be connected to tools and test equipment
4.3.4 Explain requirements for instrument and test equipment calibration
4.3.5 Describe proper methods of protecting tools and test equipment including the following:
4.3.5.1 in a radiologically controlled area
4.3.5.2 in a confined space
4.3.5.3 when working from heights
4.3.5.4 when working near open systems
4.4 RADIATION DETECTION AND MEASUREMENT PRINCIPLES Discuss the basic theory of operation and the operating characteristics of detectors, including instrument efficiency, the factors that affect instrument efficiency, and the calculation of efficiency from given information, effects of background radiation, and differentiation between the operating characteristics of a radiation field survey instrument and a radioactive contamination survey instrument.
4.4.1 Explain the functions of an ion chamber, proportional counter and Geiger-Mueller counterPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTLaboratory Instrumentation


PPTInstrumentation Review


DOCRadiaton Detection Principles and Instruments_Instructor Notes

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
4.4.2 Draw and explain a gas filled detector six region curve, including gas amplificationPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
4.4.3 Explain the function of a scintillation (micro-r meters, liquid scintillation counters, zinc-sulfide alpha counters and probes), fission chamber and semiconductors (high-purity germanium, electronic dosimeters)PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTLaboratory Instrumentation


DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTRad Measurements Instruments



DOCRadiaton Detection Principles and Instruments_Instructor Notes

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
4.5 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY INSTRUMENTS AND LABORATORY COUNTING EQUIPMENT describe the operating characteristics of radiological survey instruments and laboratory counting equipment, and perform specified tasks.
4.5.1 Explain operating characteristics for and demonstrate the ability to use radiological survey instruments applicable to chemistry techniciansPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
4.5.2 Perform and describe operational checks on survey instruments: battery, zero, (content added: calibration), source, response, background.PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
4.5.3 Identify conditions that might affect survey instrument response including geotropism, atmospheric pressure, high humidity, mixed radiation fields, noble gas atmospheres, extreme temperatures, off-scale reading, and radio frequency interference.DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTLaboratory Instrumentation


DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTRad Measurements Instruments



DOCRadiaton Detection Principles and Instruments_Instructor Notes
4.5.4 Explain the operating characteristics and basic electrical circuitry of counting and spectroscopy equipment (such as proportional counters, liquid scintillation detectors, high-purity germanium, zinc sulfide detectors).PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
4.5.5 Perform and describe operational checks for counting and spectroscopy equipment resolution, source, response and background.PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
4.5.6 Identify unusual conditions that might affect counting and spectroscopy equipment response such as high humidity, abnormal background, electronic noise, and extreme temperature.PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOCRadiaton Detection Principles and Instruments_Instructor Notes
4.5.7 Explain the operating characteristics and use of the following radiological survey and analysis instruments
4.5.7.1 alpha survey instrumentPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTPersonnel Monitoring
4.5.7.2 beta/gamma survey instrumentPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiographic Testing


PPTPersonnel Monitoring
4.5.7.3 friskerPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments


PPTPersonnel Monitoring
4.5.7.4 gamma survey instrumentPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments
PPTRadiographic Testing


PPTPersonnel Monitoring
4.5.7.5 gross alpha counterPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments



PPTPersonnel Monitoring
4.5.7.6 gross alpha/beta counterPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments



PPTPersonnel Monitoring
4.5.7.7 gross gamma counterPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments



PPTPersonnel Monitoring
4.5.7.8 liquid scintillation counterPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments



PPTPersonnel Monitoring

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
4.5.7.9 multichannel analyzer (gamma spectrometer)PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments


PPTPersonnel Monitoring
4.5.7.10 neutron survey instrumentPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments



PPTPersonnel Monitoring
4.5.7.11 proportional countersPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTPersonnel Monitoring

PPTLaboratory Instrumentation
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
4.5.7.12 smear counterPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments



PPTPersonnel Monitoring
4.6 CHEMISTRY ANALYTICAL EQUIPMENT
4.6.1 Explain the principles of operation of chemistry analytical equipmentPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTPersonnel Monitoring
4..6.2 Identify the locations of the chemistry analytical equipment and associated components (plant specific)
4.6.3 Identify unusual conditions that might affect chemistry analytical equipment responsePPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTPersonnel Monitoring
4.6.4 Identify specific maintenance requirements for chemistry analytical equipment (plant specific)
4.6.5 Describe the operation and purpose of chemistry analytical equipment including the following:
4.6.5.2 analytical balancePPTChemistry Analytical Equipment
The Chemistry Hypermedia Project
(404 - No link avail)
4.6.5.3 conductivity bridge with flow cellPPTChemistry Analytical Equipment

PDFYSI Model 31A Conductance Bridge Instructions

PDFStandard Operating Procedure for Conductivity Bridge

PDFConductivity Theory and Practice

Electrical Conductivity Detector
4.6.5.4 dissolved oxygen monitorIC-08-1  
4.6.5.5 dissolved hydrogen monitorPDFDissolved Hydrogen Monitor DoD Report

PPTPrimary Water Chemistry
4.6.5.8 in-line hydrazine monitor (PWR)PPTPrimary Water Chemistry


PDFDissolved Oxygen and Hydrazine Monitoring on Power
4.6.5.9 inductively coupled plasma analyzerPPTChemistry Analytical Equipment University of Rhode Island How Does It Work? (ICP-MS)
4.6.5.10 in-line conductivity monitorPPTPrimary Water Chemistry
Franklyn W. Kirk, Instrumentation, ATP,2010, fifth edition, ch 26, s. 6, Electrochemical Analyzers, p. 273. ISBN: 978-0-8269-3430-7  
4.6.5.11 in-line sodium monitorPDFSodium Monitoring in Water Treatment Processes
PPTChemistry Analytical Equipment
4.6.5.12 ion selective electrodePPTChemistry Analytical Equipment Ion Selective Electrodes (ISE) (New Mexico State University)
4.6.5.18 microwave digestionPDFMicrowave Digestion

PDFSample Dissolution Techniques

PPTChemistry Analytical Equipment
How Does it Work; Mass Spectrometry of ions

Multicollector-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MC-ICPMS)
4.7 SAMPLE COLLECTION EQUIPMENT (PLANT SPECIFIC)
4.7.1 Identify the types of equipment
4.7.2 Identify the locations of each type
4.7.3 Describe the applications of each type
4.7.4 Explain the principles of operation
4.7.5 Determine specific sample collection equipment to be included in chemistry technician training based on job requirements. The following are examples of sample collection equipment to consider for inclusion in the chemistry technician training program.
4.7.5.1 calibration sources and equipment
4.7.5.2 composite
4.7.5.3 corrosion products
4.7.5.4 gaseous
4.7.5.5 halide surface contamination
4.7.5.6 post-accident filter assembly
4.7.5.7 resin
The Chemistry Hypermedia Project: Analytical Balance
4.8 CALIBRATION SOURCES AND EQUIPMENT (PLANT SPECIFIC) Describe the equipment and procedures for calibration.
4.8.1 Discuss the equipment required to calibrate counting and spectroscopy equipment
4.8.2 Describe the precautions associated with calibration procedures
4.8.3 Identify the criteria for proper calibration of plant survey instruments and analytical equipment
4.8.4 Demonstrate the proper use of calibration procedures as required by specifications for each instrument or system
4.8.5 State the traceability requirements for calibration sources used in measuring radioactivity
4.8.6 Determine specific calibration sources:
4.8.6.1 certified alpha
4.8.6.2 standard alpha
4.8.6.3 certified gamma
4.8.6.4 standard gamma
4.8.6.5 certified beta
4.8.6.6 standard beta
4.8.6.7 noble gas standard
4.8.6.8 spiked charcoal cartridge gamma
4.9 RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIOACTIVE DECAY Explain and apply the theory of radioactivity and radioactive decay.
4.9.1 Identify the types of radioactive decay (alpha, beta, gamma, electron capture, internal conversion)PPTRadiographic Testing

PPTChemistry and Radcon


PPTRadioactive Decay
4.9.2 Use basic equations to describe each type of decayMA-05-1, 2, 3, 4 MA-06-1, 2, 3 MA-10- 2, 3  
4.9.3 Use exponential equations and appropriate graphs (linear and semi-log) to perform radioactive decay calculationsMA-05-1, 2, 3, 4 MA-06-1, 2, 3 MA-10- 2, 3  
4.9.4 Characterize alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays and neutrons (for example, describe the physical properties of these types of radiation)IC-09- 1, 3, MS-03- 1, 2 NS-03- 3, 4 NS-08-1  PPTInteractions with Matter
4.9.5 Use basic equations to describe the process of neutron activation03-3, 4, 5,  
4.9.6 Identify specific isotopes of concern in power reactors during operation and following shutdown (such as H-3, N-16, Ar-41, Cr-51, Mn-54, Fe-55, Co-58, Co-60, Zn-65, Kr-85, Kr-88, Zr-95, Ag-110m, I-131-135, Xe-133-135, Cs-134, Cs-137 and transuranics)PPTAir Sampling

PPTTransuranic Waste Disposal
4.9.7 Discuss complex decay schemes such as natural decay chains, reactor-producted decay chains, and equilibrium isotopes (secular, transient, or no equilibrium).PPTRadioactive Decay
4.9.8 Identify and use radiological quantities and their units including activity (curies and becquerels, disintegrations per second, disintegrations per minute), exposure (roentgens), dose (rads and grays), and dose equivalent (rems and sieverts).PPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTDose Equivalent

PPTRadiographic Testing

PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.9.9 Identify, calculate and use the following significant dose terms:
4.9.9.1 deep dose equivalentPPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.9.9.2 eye (lens) dose equivalentPPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.9.9.3 shallow dose equivalentPPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.9.9.4 effective dose equivalent (using weighting factors)PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.9.9.5 committed dose equivalent (using in vivo and in vitro measurements and intake retention fractions)PPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.9.9.6 committed effective dose equivalent (using in vivo and in vitro measurements and intake retention fractions)PPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.9.9.7 total effective dose equivalentPPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.9.9.8 total organ dose equivalentPPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.9.10 Equate radioactivity to dose rate through simple rules of thumb and associated calculation for various source geometries (6CEN, point source, line source, plan source)PPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.10 SOURCES OF RADIATION Identify and quantify sources of radiation.
4.10.1 Identify and quantify these major sources of natural background radiation
4.10.1.1 cosmic radiationPPTBackground Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation
4.10.1.2 uraniumPPTBackground Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation
4.10.1.3 thorium decay chainsPPTBackground Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation
4.10.1.4 potassium 40PPTBackground Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation
4.10.1.5 radon gas (including daughter products)PPTBackground Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation
4.10.2 Identify and quantify the following man-made sources of background radiation, medical diagnostic X-rays, radio pharmaceuticals, consumer products (television, luminous dials), weapons tests, and air travel.PPTBackground Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation
4.10.3 Identify and quantify potential sources of exposure to the public from plant liquid and gaseous effluent releases, transportation of radioactive materials, and major accidents.PPTProtection Against Radiation
4.10.4 Identify and quantify major sources of radiation in the plant that contribute to worker exposures such as the following:
4.10.4.1 primary system piping and componentsPPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTALARA for Engineers
4.10.4.2 inside containment during power operationPPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTALARA for Engineers
4.10.4.3 primary system filters and demineralizersPPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTALARA for Engineers
4.10.4.4 radwaste process systemsPPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTALARA for Engineers
PPT Gaseous Radwaste
4.10.4.5 radiographyPPTRadiographic Testing
4.11 INTERACTIONS OF RADIATION WITH MATTER Explain various interactions of radiation with matter.
4.11.1 Define the terms excitation, ionization, secondary ionization, and specific ionization.PPTInteractions with Matter

PPTChemistry and Radcon

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTInstrumentation Review

DOCRadiation Detection Principles and Instruments Instructor Notes



Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibration and Data Analysis"  
4.11.2 Describe the processes and characteristics of heavy charged particle (for example, alpha particles, protons) interaction with matter:
4.11.2.1 energy transfer by ionization and excitationPPTInteractions with Matter

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
4.11.2.2 range-energy relationshipPPTInteractions with Matter

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
4.11.2.3 range of alpha particles in air, water, and tissuePPTInteractions with Matter

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
4.11.2.4 specific ionization as a function of distancePPTInteractions with Matter

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
4.11.3 Describe the processes and characteristics of beta particle interactions with matter, range-energy relationship; energy transfer by ionization, excitation, and bremsstrahlung; irregular track due to scattering; bremsstrahlung production using high atomic number absorber; range of beta particles in air, water, and tissue density thickness. Define linear energy transfer and relative stopping for beta interactions..IC-09- 1, 3 MS-03- 3, 4 NS-03-3, 4  PPTInteractions with Matter

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection Principles and Instruments Instructor Notes
4.11.4 Describe the processes and characteristics of gamma and x-ray interaction with matter, including exponential attenuation (as opposed to maximum range), interaction by Compton scattering, photoelectric effect, pair production, and effect of atomic number of absorber on attenuation. Define linear absorption coefficient and mass absorption coefficient for gamma interactions.NS-03- 2, 3, 5 NS-07-7, 8 IC-09- 1, 9, 11, 13 ES-02- 1  PPTInteractions with Matter
4.11.5 Define fast neutron, thermal neutron, cross-section, and barn and describe how neutron energy affects probability of interaction.PPTProtection Against Radiation

4.11.6 Describe the processes and characteristics of neutron interaction with matter, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering, absorption, neutron activation, fission, and (content added: charged particle emission).NS-01-1, 2, 5 NS-04-4, 5 NS-05-1, 2, 3, 4, 5 NS-06-5  PPTInteractions with Matter
4.11.7 Based on knowledge of interaction mechanics, select types of materials for shielding each type of radiation.PPT Radioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTALARA for Engineers
4.11.8 Define buildup factor.PPT Interactions of Radiation with Matter
PDF Shielding and Buildup Factor
Definition from Nucleonica Wiki

Definition from University of Liverpool

Shielding of Gamma Radiation
4.11.9 Perform gamma and neutron shielding calculations using the following:
4.11.9.1 exponential shielding equationPPTProtection Against Radiation

PDF Shielding and Buildup Factor
4.11.9.2 half and tenth thickness valuesPPTProtection Against Radiation
4.11.9.3 empirically derived graphsPPTProtection Against RadiationH.J.Moe, Operational Health Physics Training, Argonne National Laboratory, Argon, Illinois, 1992, p.8-10  
4.11.10 Identify common shielding practices for beta particles (low Z number materials), neutrons (hydrogenous material) and gammas (high density, high Z number materials).PPTPlant Chemistry Control


PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTALARA for Engineers
4.11.11 Describe the phenomenon of sky shine and the means by which it can be minimized.PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.12 RADIOLOGICAL QUANTITIES AND UNITS (see Radioactivity and Radioactive Decay) Explain and apply the concepts related to radiological quantities and units.
4.12.1 Identify and use radiological quantities and their units:
4.12.1.1 activity (curie and Becquerel)PPTBackground Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTRadiographic Testing


PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.12.1.2 exposure (roentgen)PPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTRadiographic Testing

4.12.1.3 dose (rad and gray)PPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTRadiographic Testing


PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.12.1.4 dose equivalent (rem and sievert)PPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTRadiographic Testing


PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.12.2 Equate the radioactivity of sources to the gamma dose rate at specific distances using basic rules of thumb and calculationsPPTExposure Rate



PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTRadiographic Testing


PPTExternal Exposure Control
4.13 COUNTING STATISTICS Explain and apply the concepts related to counting statistics.
4.14 RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION STANDARDS Discuss the historical development, purpose, and philosophy of radiation protection standards.
4.14.1 Discuss the historical development of radiological protection standards.PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level


DOCThe National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements


DOCInternational Commission on Radiological Protection

DOCAmerican National Standards Institute

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
4.14.2 Explain the purpose of radiological protection standards and guidelines.PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level


DOCThe National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements


DOCInternational Commission on Radiological Protection

DOCAmerican National Standards Institute

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
4.14.3 Identify the regulatory and advisory organizations that have cognizance in this area and describe the function of each:
4.14.3.1 International Commission on Radiation ProtectionDOCInternational Commission on Radiological Protection

PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
4.14.3.2 National Council on Radiation Protection and MeasurementsDOCThe National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements

PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
4.14.3.3 International Commission on Radiation Units and MeasurementsDOCInternational Commission on Radiological Protection

PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
4.14.3.4 International Atomic Energy AgencyDOC International Atomic Energy Agency


PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
4.14.3.5 American National Standards InstituteDOCAmerican National Standards

PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
4.14.3.6 Nuclear Regulatory CommissionDOCNuclear Regulatory Commission


PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
4.14.3.7 Department of TransportationDOCDepartment of Transportation


PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
4.14.3.8 Agreement stateDOCAgreement State


PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations

PPTRad Measurements Instruments


4.14.4 Discuss the philosophy of radiation protection limits, to include the prevention of nostochastic effects, minimization of stochastic effect, concept of acceptable risk or comparable risk, and concepts of cost versus benefit and ALARA.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination and Respiratory Protection



PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations

PPTALARA for Engineers

4.14.5 Define and discuss the interrelationship among the following: regulation, regulatory guide, NUREG, license condition, and technical specification.PPTPlant Status


PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines


PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations

PPTALARA for Engineers
4.14.6 Explain the principles and use the following standards:
4.14.6.1 10CFR 19--Notices, Instructions, and Reports to WorkersPPTALARA for Engineers

PPTRadiographic Testing


PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry


PPTProtection Against Radiation
PPT
4.14.6.2 10CFR 20--Standards for Protection Against RadiationPPTRadiographic Testing

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPT Protection Against Radiation
4.14.6.3 10CFR 21--Reporting of Defects and NoncompliancePPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
4.14.6.4 10CFR 34--Licenses for Radiography and Radiation Safety Requirements for Radiographic OperationsPPTRadiographic Testing

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
4.14.6.5 10CFR 50--Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization FacilitiesPPTPlant Status


PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
4.14.6.6 10CFR 61--Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radwaste PPTTransuranic Waste Disposal

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
PPTRadiological Safety & Response
4.14.6.7 10CFR 71--Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive MaterialsPPTTransuranic Waste Disposal
PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
U.S. NRC Part 71 Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material
4.14.6.8 regulatory guides applicable to power reactor radiological protection (such as RG 8.38, RG 8/13, RG 8/15)PPTRadiological Safety & Response
4.14.7 Describe the organization and content of the corporate and plant health physics manuals (plant specific).
4.15 RADIATION EXPOSURE CONTROL Explain and apply the following concepts related to radiation exposure control.
4.15.1 Explain the ALARA concept and how it is applied to the performance of radiological work at the plant (time, distance, shielding, engineering controls and source reduction)PPTALARA for Engineers

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPTRPTechnicianTrainingEngineeringControls.ppt

PPTProtection Against Radiation

4.15.2 Identify technical and administrative controls for the installation and removal of temporary shielding (plant specific)
4.15.3 Demonstrate proper survey techniques using appropriate instruments (plant specific)
4.16 RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION CONTROL Explain and apply the concepts related to radioactive contamination control.
4.16.1 Identify potential sources of radioactive contamination including work operations that can generate contaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
4.16.2 Describe techniques for controlling the spread of contamination to personnel and equipment, including wearing protective clothing, packaging contaminated materials, using containment devices, controlling leaks from radioactive systems, and decontamination.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTProtection Against Radiation
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
4.16.3 Identify the isotopes of primary concern for airborne radioactivity at the plant such as H-3, Co-58, Co-60, CS-134, CS-137,. I-131PPTAir Sampling
4.16.4 Explain the characteristic difference between particulate, iodine, tritium and noble gases and how they affect the method of detecting and controlling airborne radioactivityPPTAir Sampling
4.16.5 Identify the main ventilation and filtration systems in the plant (plant specific)
4.16.6 Discuss the purpose of using a continuous air monitor and identify situations in which continuous air monitors should be usedPPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program
4.16.7 Describe controls that can be used to reduce exposure to airborne radioactivity, such as using filtered ventilation, decontaminating areas or equipment to eliminate the source of airborne radioactivity, using containment devices (such as tents, glove bags), repairing leaks in contaminated systems, performing work under water or keeping contaminated materials wet, and using a respirator (last resort).PPTRP Technician Training Engineering Controls

PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTAlara for Engineers
4.16.8 Discuss how eating, smoking and drinking in a contaminated area can result in internal exposuresPPTBiological Effects of Radiation

4.17 DECONTAMINATION Explain and apply the concepts related to decontamination.
4.17.1 Demonstrate proper procedures and techniques for personnel, equipment, clothing and area decontaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTProtection Against Radiation
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
4.17.2 Identify problems that might be encountered during decontamination effortsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTProtection Against Radiation
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
4.18 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL CONTROL (PLANT SPECIFIC) Explain and apply the concepts related to radioactive material control.
4.18.1 Explain procedure controls and demonstrate the use of records for the control of effluent discharges
4.18.2 Explain how technical specification limits are used
4.18.3 Identify licensed radioactive sources that must be controlled
4.18.4 Describe station radioactive source control procedures
4.18.5 Describe station radioactive material storage procedures
4.18.6 Describe procedures and practices that minimize solid and liquid radioactive waste
4.19 RADIOLOGICAL INCIDENT EVALUATION AND CONTROL (PLANT SPECIFIC) Explain and apply the concepts related to incident evaluation and control.
4.19.1 Identify radiological conditions that might result from different incidents including incidents related to a degraded core
4.19.2 Identify (recognize) the potential for an incident from improper work practices
4.19.3 Identify (recognize) incidents that may be indicated by instrument responses and alarms
4.19.4 Describe immediate actions needed to control a radiological incident
4.20 WATER CHEMISTRY FUNDAMENTALS Explain and apply the concepts related to water chemistry fundamentals.
4.20.1 Explain the terms, units, definitions and basic concepts for the following topics:
4.20.1.1 atomic structure and nomenclatureNS-01-1, 2, 3, 4, 5  PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
4.20.1.2 acid-base reactionsCH-03- 2  
4.20.1.3 elements, compounds and ionsCH-01- 3 CH-04- 2  PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
4.20.1.4 Periodic Table of ElementsCH-04- 10, 11, 12, 13, 14  PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
4.20.1.5 salts, solutions and solubilityCH-02- 9 CH-03- 1, 2  
4.20.1.6 oxidation and reductionCH-06- 6. 7  
4.20.1.7 chemical equilibriumPPTPlant ChemistryChemistry Hypermedia Project Introduction to Equilibrium
(404 site not found)
4.20.1.8 valence and chemical combinationCH-02- 1  
4.20.1.9 units of measure used in chemistryCH-01-9  
4.20.1.9a parts per million (ppm), parts per billion (ppb) and parts per trillion PPTPPTChemistry Fundamentals
4.20.1.9b normalityPPTChemistry Fundamentals
4.20.1.9c molarityPPTChemistry Fundamentals
4.20.1.9d equivalentsPPTChemistry Fundamentals
4.20.1.9e Cc/kgPPTPlant Chemistry
4.20.1.9f weight percentPPTChemistry Fundamentals
4.20.1.10 effects of temperature and pressure on chemical reactionsHT- 01- 9  
4.20.1.11 mixtures and solutionsPPTChemistry Fundamentals

PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
4.20.1.12 properties of waterPPTChemistry Fundamentals

PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
4.20.1.12a conductivity (of water in �mhos/cm)PPTPlant Chemistry

PPTChemistry and Radcon
4.20.1.12b pHPPTPlant Chemistry

PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
4.20.1.12c densityPPTChemistry Fundamentals
4.20.1.13 types of impurities found in waterCH-04-1, 2, 14, 18  PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
4.20.1.13a dissolved gasesPPTPlant Chemistry

PPTChemistry and Radcon
4.20.1.13b scale-forming agentsPPTFundamentals of Corrosion
4.20.1.13c water hardness agentsPPTChemistry control

PPTChemistry and Radcon
4.20.1.13d dissolved saltsPPTChemistry control


PPTChemistry and Radcon
4.20.1.13e suspended matterPPTPlant Chemistry
4.20.1.13f colloidal and organic compoundsPPTPlant Chemistry

PPTChemistry and Radcon
4.20.1.14 sources of impurities (such as tube breaks in heat exchanges, chemical intrusions, foreign material)CH-05-5  PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
4.20.1.15 effects of impurities (such as heat transfer reduction, corrosion, resin fouling, increase in radiation levels, fuel damage)CH-04- 1 CH-05- 3, 5 CH-06- 1, 5, 14, 15  PPTCooling Towers and Air Cooled Condensers

PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
4.20.1.16 control/removal of impurities (such as ion exchange, evaporation, reverse osmosis, feed and bleed)CH-04-5, 7, 9, 10  PPTWater Treatment
4.20.1.17 water quality/purityCH-04- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19  
4.20.1.18 grades of waterPPTWater GradesWater in the Laboratory A Tutorial
4.20.2 Write basic chemical formulasPPTChemistry Fundamentals

PPT target="_blank">Plant Chemistry

PPTChemistry and Radcon
4.20.3 Balance basic chemical equationsPPTChemistry FundamentalsChemistry Unit 2 Lessons
4.20.4 Calculate the weight of a compound to be dissolved in water to produce an elemental standard of a predetermined concentrationPPTChemistry FundamentalsNivaldo J. Tro, Principles of Chemistry ,Pearson, 2013, ch.3, sec. 7, Formula MAss and the Mole Concept for Compunds, p 91. ISBN-13:978-0-321-79997-5  
4.21 GENERAL LABORATORY PRACTICES Explain and apply the concepts related to sample collection equipment.
4.21.1 Identify types of general laboratory equipment
4.21.1.1 lab warePPTGeneral Laboratory PracticesMerriam Webster Visual Dictionary Online

The National Academy Press Working with Laboratory Equipment target="_blank">

Newton Basic Laboratory Equipment Guide
4.21.1.2 glasswarePPTGeneral Laboratory PracticesEducation Portal

Merriam Webster Visual Dictionary Online

Dartmouth Chemlab
4.21.1.3 balancesPPTGeneral Laboratory PracticesEducation Portal

Merriam Webster Visual Dictionary Online
4.21.1.4 heating apparatusPPTGeneral Laboratory PracticesEducation Portal

Merriam Webster Visual Dictionary Online

4.21.1.5 separation apparatusPPTGeneral Laboratory PracticesThe Chemistry Hypermedia Project - Separations
(404 Site not found)
4.21.1.6 hydrometers/viscometersPPTGeneral Laboratory PracticesFranklyn W. Kirk, Instrumentation, ATP,2010, fifth edition, ch 26, s. 6, Liquid Analyzers, p. 258. ISBN: 978-0-8269-3430-7  
4.21.1.7 pipettesPPTGeneral Laboratory PracticesMerriam Webster Visual Dictionary Online

Dartmouth Chemlab
4.21.1.8 titratorsPPTGeneral Laboratory PracticesChemistry Hypermedia Project - Titration (404 site not found)

Dartmouth Chemlab
4.21.1.9 dessicatorsPPTGeneral Laboratory PracticesCalifornia State University Dominguez Hills Proper Use of a Desiccator
4.21.2 Describe the function of each type of general laboratory equipmentPPTGeneral Laboratory PracticesWorking with Laboratory Equipment. The National Academies Press

Dartmouth Chemlab

4.21.3 Discuss the importance of and standards for the cleanliness of laboratory equipmentPDFGLP Good Laboratory Practice

PPTGeneral Laboratory Practices
Dartmouth Chemlab
4.21.4 Describe laboratory equipment cleaning methodsPDFGLP Good Laboratory Practice


PPTGeneral Laboratory Practices
4.21.5 Describe rules for laboratory safetyPDFGLP Good Laboratory Practice

PPT An Overview of Laboratory Safety

4.21.5.1 wearing eye protection and protective clothingPPT An Overview of Laboratory Safety
PDF Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology
Selecting Personal Protective Clothing. Stanford University, Laboratory Chemical Safety Toolkit
4.21.5.2 handling acids and basesPDF Introduction to Medical Laboratory T

PPTGeneral Laboratory Practices
H.J.Moe, Operational Health Physics Training, Argonne National Laboratory, Argon, Illinois, 1992, p. 14-10, "Lapel Air Samplers"  
4.21.5.3 using compressed gasesPPTGeneral Laboratory PracticesGeneral Use SOP for Compressed Gases. Stanford University, Laboratory Chemical Safety Toolkit
4.21.5.4 storing chemicalsPPT An Overview of Laboratory Safety

PDFIntroduction to Medical Laboratory
Technology

4.21.5.5 fighting firesPDFIntroduction to Medical Laboratory Technology

PPTFire Detection & Protection Systemchnology
4.21.5.6 labeling chemicalsPPT An Overview of Laboratory Safety
4.21.5.7 using eyewashes and showersPPT An Overview of Laboratory Safety
4.21.6 Describe requirements and procedures related to chemical shelf-lifeChemicals: Shelf Lives (404 no site)

Department of Defense Shelf Life Program (404 no site)

GSA Shelf Life Management Program
4.22 WATER TREATMENT Explain and apply the concepts related to water treatment.
4.22.1 Explain the terms, units, definitions and basic concepts of the following processes
4.22.1.1 clarification (coagulation and flocculation)PPTPlant Chemistry

PPTWater Treatment
4.22.1.2 evaporationPPTPlant Chemistry

PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTPlant Chemistry Overview

PPTWater Treatment
4.22.1.3 filtrationPPTFilters, Strainers, Snubbers, and Hangers

PPTPlant Chemistry

PPTWater Treatment
4.22.1.4 oil separation
PPTWater Treatment

DOCChemical and Oily Waste Water
4.22.1.5 reverse osmosisPPTWater Treatment
4.22.1.6 removal of gases from water (degassing)
PPTPlant Chemistry

PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTWater Treatment
4.22.1.7 removal of organic material from waterPPTPlant Chemistry

PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTWater Treatment
4.23 ION EXCHANGE (DEMINERALIZATION) Explain and apply the concepts related to ion exchange.
4.23.1 Explain ion exchange theoryCH-04-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19  
4.23.2 Identify ion exchange resins (such as anion, cation, mixed bed)CH-04- 4  
4.23.3 Describe the ion exchange processCH-04- 2, 3, 5  
4.23.3.1 bed exhaustion indications (differential pressure, silica, breakthrough)CH-04- 8, 11, 15, 16, 17,  
4.23.3.2 bed regeneration (plant specific)
4.23.3.3 problems with calcium sulfate precipitation (plant specific)
4.23.3.4 problems with organic fouling (plant specific)
4.23.4 Discuss resin intrusion into the reactor/steam generator (plant specific)
4.23.5 Discuss resin degradation due to high temperature or freezing, including high differential pressure crushed beads, dry beadsCH-04- 16, 19  
4.24 WATER CHEMISTRY SPECIFICATIONS AND BASES (PLANT SPECIFIC) Explain and apply the concepts related to water chemistry specifications and the basis for each specification.
4.24.1 Explain the content and bases of the following documents as related to the job
4.24.1.1 vendor chemistry specifications
4.24.1.2 technical specifications
4.24.1.3 plant chemistry specifications
4.24.1.4 owners group specifications
4.24.1.5 other chemistry specifications
4.25 CORROSION AND CORROSION PROTECTION Explain and apply the concepts related to corrosion and corrosion prevention.
4.25.1 Describe the types and causes of corrosion
4.25.1.1 creviceCH-06-18, 19 MS-02-16  
4.25.1.2 dentingCH-06- 3, 18, 19  
4.25.1.3 flow acceleratedPPTEffects of Corrosion
4.25.1.4 galvanicCH-06- 17 MS-02- 16  
4.25.1.5 generalCH06- 1, 2, 3  
4.25.1.6 pittingCH06- 3, 18, 19  
4.25.1.7 stressCH-06- 3, 18, 19 MS-02-2, 3, 4, 5  
4.25.1.8 wastageDOCPrimary Systems
4.25.1.9 microbiological induced corrosionPPTPlant Chemistry

PPTProperties of Reactor Plant Materials
4.25.2 Identify the factors that affect the rates of corrosionPPTEffects of Corrosion
4.25.3 Describe corrosion control methods during operation (use of corrosion inhibitors, molar ratio and pH control)CH-06-1, 2, 3, 5, 12, 16, 17, 18, 19 MS-02-16, 17  PPTChemistry and Radcon
4.25.4 Describe corrosion control methods during shutdown (use of corrosion inhibitors, pH control, temperature and dry layup)PPTEffects of Corrosion

PPTChemistry and Radcon
4.25.5 Discuss the control of depositsPPTEffects of Corrosion

PPTChemistry and Radcon
4.25.6 Discuss the minimization of intergranular stress corrosion in BWRsPPTEffects of Corrosion
4.25.7 Discuss the control of living organisms (algae, zebra mussels and Asiatic clams)PPTPlant Chemistry

PPTCooling Towers and Air Cooled Condensers
PPT
4.25.8 Discuss the control of corrosive materials
4.25.9 Discuss layup protection for plant systems (plant specific)
4.25.10 Discuss the effect of component corrosion on out-of-core radiation levels such as Co-60 reduction and induced crud burst (forced oxidation)PPTEffects of Corrosion

PPTPlant Chemistry


PPTChemistry and Radcon
4.26 WATER CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES Explain and apply the concepts related to water chemistry techniques.
4.26.1 Perform the following wet chemistry techniques
4.26.1.1 titrationsNivaldo J. Tro, Principles of Chemistry ,Pearson, 2013, ch. 16, sec. 4, Titrations and pH curves, p 635.  Titration

Chemistry Hypermedia Project - Titration (404 no site)

4.26.1.2 chemical separationsPDF Separation Techniques


PPTWater Chemistry Techniques
Separation of Mixtures Using Different Techniques
4.26.1.3 distillation
PPTWater Chemistry Techniques
Distillation

Separation Techniques
4.26.1.4 carrier usePDFSample Dissolution Techniques


PDF Separation Techniques

PPTWater Chemistry Techniques
Gas Carrier
4.26.1.5 gravimetric determinations
PPTWater Chemistry Techniques
Chapter XV: Gravimetric Methods
4.26.1.6 ashing (plant specific)
4.26.1.7 fusingPDFSample Dissolution Techniques

PPTWater Chemistry Techniques
4.26.1.8 precipitationPDF Separation Techniques

PPTWater Chemistry Techniques
Nivaldo J. Tro, Principles of Chemistry ,Pearson, 2013, ch. 4, sec. 6, Precipitation Reactions, p 141.  
4.26.1.9 sample fixing (preservation)
PPTWater Chemistry Techniques
Sample Preservation
4.26.1.10 concentration techniques (for example, solvent extraction)
PDFSolvent Extraction

PPTWater Chemistry Techniques
4.26.1.11 preparation of standard solutionsPPTHow to Make Standard Solutions

PPTWater Chemistry Techniques
4.27 CHEMISTRY SAMPLING PROCEDURES (PLANT SPECIFIC) Explain and apply the concepts related to chemistry sampling procedures.
4.27.1 Review and discuss the following chemical sampling procedures
4.27.1.1 primary system sampling (PWR)
4.27.1.2 secondary system sampling (PWR)
4.27.1.3 condensate/feedwater sampling (BWR)
4.27.1.4 reactor water sampling (BWR)
4.27.1.5 auxiliary systems sampling
4.27.1.6 makeup water plant sampling
4.27.1.7 radwaste sampling
4.27.1.8 radioactive effluent sampling
4.27.1.9 post-accident sampling
4.27.2 Review and discuss the following as related to sampling procedures
4.27.2.1 radiological hazards
4.27.2.2 flushing of sample lines
4.27.2.3 flushing of sample containers
4.27.2.4 recirculation of tanks
4.27.2.5 protection of the sample from contamination
4.27.2.6 effect of changing sample flow on suspended solids and radioactive crud
4.27.2.7 identification of samples, including the recording of sampling data such as date, time and operational status of the system
4.27.3 Review and discuss the following as related to post-accident sampling procedures
4.27.3.1 radiation hazards associated with post-accident sampling
4.27.3.2 effects of safety injection on samples
4.27.3.3 storage of post-accident samples
4.27.3.4 recordkeeping associated with post-accident sampling
4.28 CHEMICAL ANALYSIS PROCEDURES (PLANT SPECIFIC) Explain and apply the concepts related to chemical analysis procedures.
4.28.1 Explain and perform the chemical analysis procedures for the following:
4.28.1.1 acid number of oil
4.28.1.2 alkalinity
4.28.1.3 aluminum
4.28.1.4 ammonia
4.28.1.5 biochemical oxygen demand
4.28.1.6 boron
4.28.1.7 calcium
4.28.1.8 chloride
4.28.1.9 chlorine
4.28.1.10 chromate
4.28.1.11 chromium
4.28.1.12 conductivity (cation and specific)
4.28.1.13 copper
4.28.1.14 dissolved oxygen in water
4.28.1.15 dissolved solids in water
4.28.1.16 fecal coliform
4.28.1.17 fluoride
4.28.1.18 hydrazine
4.28.1.19 hydrogen
4.28.1.20 hardness
4.28.1.21 iron
4.28.1.22 lithium
4.28.1.23 magnesium
4.28.1.24 neutralization number of oil
4.28.1.25 nickel4.28.1.25 nickel
4.28.1.26 nitrates
4.28.1.27 nitrites
4.28.1.28 oil in water
4.28.1.29 particle count in oil
4.28.1.30 pH
4.28.1.31 phosphate
4.28.1.32 potassium
4.28.1.33 resin
4.28.1.34 sediment in oil
4.28.1.35 silica
4.28.1.36 sludge (percent)
4.28.1.37 sodium
4.28.1.38 sodium hydroxide
4.28.1.39 specific gravity
4.28.1.40 sulfate
4.28.1.41 suspended solids in water
4.28.1.42 total organic carbon
4.28.1.43 trace organic acids
4.28.1.44 turbidity
4.28.1.45 viscosity
4.28.1.46 water in oil
4.29 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS PROCEDURES (PLANT SPECIFIC) Explain and apply the concepts related to radiochemical analysis procedures.
4.29.1 Explain and perform the radiochemical analysis procedures for the following:
4.29.1.1 gamma isotopic analysis
4.29.1.2 alpha measurement
4.29.1.3 E-bar calculation
4.29.1.4 gross beta-gamma measurement
4.29.1.5 iodine
4.29.1.6 radiochemical separations
4.29.1.7 tritium
4.29.2 Review and discuss the following as related to radiochemical sampling procedures
4.29.2.1 distance between the sample and the detector
4.29.2.2 effect of the background
4.29.2.3 effect of high count rates
4.29.2.4 separation of nuclides to be counted
4.29.2.5 establishment of homogeneous samples
4.29.2.6 effect of self-absorption and back-scatter
4.29.2.7 peak identification and analysis problems
4.30 QUALITY CONTROL PROGRAM Explain and apply the concepts related to the quality control program.
4.30.1 Describe the chemistry quality control program for laboratory and counting room analyses (plant specific)
4.30.2 Discuss commonly used quality control terms
4.30.2.1 accuracyPPTQuality Control Program

PDFAnalytic Chemistry Glossary

Glossary of QC Terms. Westgard.

Analytical Control Facility. US Fish and Wildlife Service

Analytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry

4.30.2.2 blankPPTQuality Control Program


PPTAnalytic Chemistry Glossary
Glossary of QC Terms. Westgard.

Analytical Control Facility. US Fish and Wildlife Service

Analytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry

4.30.2.3 calibrationPPTQuality Control Program

PPTAnalytic Chemistry Glossary
Glossary of QC Terms. Westgard.

Analytical Control Facility. US Fish and Wildlife Service

Analytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry

4.30.2.4 calibration checkPPTQuality Control ProgramGlossary of QC Terms. Westgard.

Analytical Control Facility. US Fish and Wildlife Service

Analytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry

4.30.2.5 calibration curvePPTQuality Control Program

PPTAnalytic Chemistry Glossary
Analytical Control Facility. US Fish and Wildlife Service

Analytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry

4.30.2.6 check sourcePPTQuality Control Program


PDFExample of Source Control in Construction Quality

Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation and Quality Control: A Review

Glossary of QC Terms. Westgard.

Defining the best quality-control systems by design and inspection

Analytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry

4.30.2.7 functional checkPPTQuality Control ProgramAnalytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry

Defining the best quality-control systems by design and inspection

Quality Control Basic Concepts
4.30.2.8 performance checkPPTQuality Control Program

PDF Guide to Quality in Analytical Chemistry
Analytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry

Glossary of QC Terms. Westgard.

Analytical Control Facility. US Fish and Wildlife Service

4.30.2.9 precisionPPTQuality Control Program

PPTAnalytic Chemistry Glossary
Analytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry

Glossary of QC Terms. Westgard.

Analytical Control Facility. US Fish and Wildlife Service

4.30.2.10 quality control chartPPTQuality Control Program

PPTAnalytic Chemistry Glossary
Quality Control Charts. University of Texas Arlington

Engineering Statistics Handbook: National Institute of Standards and Technology

Quality Control Charts Selected Topics in Assurance Related Technologies v.11 n.4

4.30.2.11 spiked sample (increase concentration above minimum detectable)PPTQuality Control Program

PPTAnalytic Chemistry Glossary
Analytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry(404 site not found)
4.30.2.12 standardPPTAnalytic Chemistry Glossary

PPTQuality Control: Get Your Instruments Under Control!
PPT Quality Control: Get Your Instruments Under Control!

PDFMake No Mistakes Errors Can Be Controlled
Analytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry (404 site not found)

Engineering Statistics Handbook: National Institute of Standards and Technology

4.30.3 Discuss the selection of appropriate analysis standards (choose calibration sourcePPTPlant Chemistry Control

PPTPlant Chemistry Overview
Analytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry (404 site not found)

4.30.4 Describe the preparation and use of known and spiked samplesPDFGuide to Quality in Analytical ChemistryAnalytical Chemistry 2.0 An Electronic Textbook for Introductory Courses in Analytical Chemistry (404 site not found)

The Proper Preparation and Use of Quality Control Samples
4.30.5 Discuss plant chemistry acceptance criteria for analytical data (plant specific)
4.30.6 Discuss the quality control program for chemistry on-line monitors (plant specific)
4.30.7 Discuss the appropriate response to conditions that are out of the acceptable limit (plant specific)
4.30.8 Use quality control charts for applicable analyses (plant specific)
4.30.9 Select appropriate analysis standards (plant specific)
4.30.10 Prepare and use known and spiked samples (plant specific)
4.31 CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (PLANT SPECIFIC) Explain and apply the concepts related to the chemistry conduct of operations.
4.31.1 Review and describe the following Chemistry Department guidelines:
4.31.1.1 explain departmental administrative procedures
4.31.1.2 identify recordkeeping requirements
4.31.1.3 describe chemistry interpretation requirements
4.31.1.4 identify reporting requirements
4.31.1.5 describe methods of diagnosing chemistry data
4.31.1.6 explain the response to out-of-specification conditions
4.31.1.7 discuss indications of degraded core conditions
4.32 SPECIALIZED SKILLS (PLANT SPECIFIC) specialized skills.
4.32.1 Calibrate laboratory instruments such as:
4.32.1.1 atomic absorption spectrophotometer
4.32.1.2 direct current plasma spectrophotometer
4.32.1.3 ion chromatograph
4.32.1.4 multichannel analyzer
4.32.2 Review and interpret gamma spectroscopy data
4.32.3 Troubleshoot basic analytical instrument problems

Maintenance Personnel

ACADsGP Strategies Matrix
Lesson - Chapter - Objectives
Gap Materials from RCNET & Academic PartnersTextbooks & Other Published MaterialsWeb-Based Resources
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5.0 DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC CURRICULUM FOR MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL
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5.1 DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC CURRICULUM FOR MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL: MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN
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5.1.1 Power Plant Fundamentals
5.1.1.1 Electrical Science: Maintenance Student
5.1.1.1.1 Explain the basics of the following topics
5.1.1.1.1.1 grounding systemsPPTSwitchgear & Motor Control Centers All About Circuts

The Importance of Electrical Safety in All About Circuits

5.1.1.1.1.2 electrical hazards and safetyES-07-13, 14  The Importance of Electrical Safety in All About Circuits
5.1.1.1.1.3 electrical power sourcesES-03-6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14  All About Circuts
5.1.1.1.1.4 power distribution (AC and DC)ES-14-7, 8, 9  All About Circuits

What is Alternating Current (AC)? (Provides a good background of how both AC and DC power works and is distributed)


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5.1.1.2 Topics specific to electrical maintenance and instrument and control (I&C) technicians
5.1.1.2.1 Electrical maintenance and I&C students explain the following topics:
5.1.1.2.1.1 basic electronics components (such as transistors BJT, FET, IGFET, MOSFET, SCR and diodes)ES-03-6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 ES-10- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  All About Circuts
5.1.1.2.1.2 circuit functions (such as switching amplifiers, voltage regulation, limiters, and rectification)ES-07- 15,16,17 ES-11- 5, 6 IC-09- 11, 14  All About Circuts
5.1.1.2.1.3 circuit breakers and fusesES-14- 3, 4, 5, 6  PPTSwitchgear & Motor Control Centers All About Circuts
5.1.1.2.1.4 construction of conductors and insulators (such as examples of various cables, shielding, and failure mechanisms)ES-01-1, 2  All About Circuts
5.1.1.2.1.5 electron theoryES-01-1  All About Circuts
5.1.1.2.1.6 inductance, capacitance, impedance, resonance, and reactanceES-01-3 ES-04- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ES-09-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19  All About Circuts
5.1.1.2.1.7 instrumentation, schematics, control circuitry, ground detection, and protective relaying (including the use of associated drawings for diagnosing circuit trouble)PPTElectrical Distribution

PPTBasic Print Reading

PPTElectrical Prints and Drawings

PPTPlant Status

PPTMechanical Print Readings

PPTMechanical Print Reading (2)


PPTOverview of Nuclear Plant Systems



PPTSwitchgear & Motor Control Centers

PPTNeutron Monitoring

DOCFire Detection and Protection Instructor Notes
All About Circuts
5.1.1.2.1.9 relaysES-01-2 ES-14-2, 3, 4, 6, 8  All About Circuts
5.1.1.2.1.10 series, parallel, and combination circuits applied to AC and DC circuitsES-03- 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 12, 14  PPTDigital Feedwater Control Systems

PDFDigital Feedwater Control Systems

All About Circuts
5.1.1.2.1.12 theory of operations of plant electrical componentsES-11-2, 13, 14, 15, 16  Free electrical circuit simulator LTSPICE can be used to perform simulations of linear and switching power supplies


Get the LTSPICE userguide here

Also find free, easy to use demo circuits to use with LTSPICE

Power Supply Circuits at All About Circuits online textbook Z
5.1.1.2.1.12a motors (such as types and classifications)ES-06-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13  PDFPlant Overview--Motors
5.1.1.2.1.12b generators (such as types and classifications)ES-05-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13  
5.1.1.2.1.12c transformersES-11-2, 13, 14, 15, 16  
5.1.1.2.1.12c1 types, functions and operationES-11-13, 14  
5.1.1.2.1.12c2 fault symptoms and hazardsPPTPlant Status
5.1.1.2.1.12c3 safety and environmental precautions associated with coolingPPTPlant Status

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program
5.1.1.2.1.12c4 fire protection systemsIC-07- 2  PPTFire Detection & Protection System


DOCFire Protection Carbon Dioxide System Instructor Notes

DOCFire Protection System Halon Lesson Plan

DOCFire Protection System Water Protection Instructor Notes

DOCFire Detection and Protection Instructor Notes
5.1.1.2.1.12d voltage regulatorsES-11-2, 13, 14, 15, 16  
5.1.1.2.1.12e linear and switching power suppliesPPTElectronic Controls


PPTSwitchgear & Motor Control Centers
All About Circuts
5.1.1.2.1.12f inverters (such as battery backup systemsES-07  All About Circuts
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5.1.2 Plant Systems and Components Knowledge
5.1.2.1 Advanced Systems and Components: Maintenance Student
5.1.2.1.1 Explain clearance/tagging requirements.PPTSafety Clearances and Tagging


PPTRadiation Protection Postings
5.1.2.1.2 Describe the proper methods for handling and disposing of waste or hazardous materials that result from system maintenance.PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines


PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTProtection Against Radiation
5.1.2.1.3 Describe component failure modes (for example, valve thermal binding and relay failures), and discuss the possible diagnostic and repair actions that may be necessary.ES-14-2, 3, 4, 6, 8  
5.1.2.1.4 Describe the proper methods and practices for safe troubleshooting of defective components.PPTTroubleshooting Techniques and Guidelines

PPTSystematic Troubleshooting
5.1.2.1.5 Describe the proper methods for breaching systems, including applicable radiological exposure and contamination controls.
PPTRP Technician Training Engineering Controls
5.1.2.1.6 Describe the application and operation of various devices (for example, video cameras, filter removal tools, and remotely operated machines) used for radiological exposure reduction.PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

DOCRadioactive Materials Handling and Accountability
5.1.2.1.7 Describe potential hazards (for example, electrical shock, high-temperature or high-pressure fluid used in system) associated with maintenance activities on specific systems.PPTTroubleshooting Techniques and Guidelines

PPTSystematic Troubleshooting


DOC Primary Systems
5.1.2.1.8 Describe the proper disassembly and assembly methods, including removal, replacement, repair and torqueing techniquesPPTTroubleshooting Techniques and Guidelines

PPTSystematic Troubleshooting

DOCPrimary Systems
5.1.2.1.9 Describe the proper methods for adjustments and calibrations on components or systemsDOC Primary Systems

PPTMeasurement System
5.1.2.1.10 Describe the methods to test (for example, leakage test, component operation, loop functional test, valve operation) a component when maintenance work is completed, and describe the administrative controls for performing local and manual operation of components during maintenance activities.IC-06-7  PPTLoop Tuning

PPTLoop Calibration, Control & Troubleshooting 
5.1.2.1.11 Explain the limitations of and requirements for maintenance activities associated with environmentally qualified and safety-related components and equipmentPPTPlant Status
5.1.2.1.12 Explain acceptable cleaning and inspection techniques for system components; and explain the lubrication principles associated with components such as valves, pumps, motors, and valve actuators, including the problems associated with improper lubrication.IC-06- 1, 2 ME-01-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ME-02-2, 3, 11, 12, 20 ME-08-12  
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5.1.2.13 Explain post-maintenance testing requirements and responsibilities including the following attributes:
5.1.2.13.1 interdepartmental notifications (for example, Operations, Quality Control, Engineering)PPTPlant Status

PPTKey 10CFR Parts for the Nuclear Industry
5.1.2.13.2 importance of documenting maintenance actions and component parametersPPTPlant Status

PPTKey 10CFR Parts for the Nuclear Industry

PDFBrowns Ferry Fire

PDFDavis-Besse

PDFIdaho Falls


PPTKey 10CFR Parts for the Nuclear Industry
5.1.2.13.3 acceptance criteria determinationPPTVisual Inspection

PPTTroubleshooting Techniques and Guidelines

PPTSystematic Troubleshooting
5.1.2.13.4 program commitments (for example, technical specifications, industry standards, regulatory documents)PPTPlant Status

PPTKey 10CFR Parts for the Nuclear Industry

PPTVisual Inspection
5.1.2.13.5 component testing requirements (for example, inspection, leak test, functional test, calibration) associated with a work activityPPTPlant Status

PPTVisual Inspection

PPTTroubleshooting Techniques and Guidelines

PPTSystematic Troubleshooting
5.1.2.13.6 visual inspection characteristics (for example, component free of corrosion, fasteners/terminations tight)PPTVisual Inspection
5.1.2.13.7 installation activities (for example, wiring checks, pressure tests, torque verifications)PDFConstruction Quality Assurance Program & Quality Control Procedures. Southern Company
5.1.2.13.8 operational test characteristics (for example, proper rotation, temperature, voltage, pressure)PPTVisual Inspection

PPTTroubleshooting Techniques and Guidelines

PPTSystematic Troubleshooting
5.1.2.14 Identify alarms, indications, interlocks and automatic features affected by important maintenance activitiesPPTPlant Status

PPTBasic Print Reading

PPTMechanical Print Readings

PPTMechanical Print Reading (2)

PPTTroubleshooting Techniques and Guidelines

PPTSystematic Troubleshooting
5.1.2.15 Identify abnormal system and component indications and diagnose the probable causesPPTVisual Inspection

PPTTroubleshooting Techniques and Guidelines

PPTSystematic Troubleshooting
5.1.2.16 Identify when components have been removed properly from service before maintenance activities are performedIC-01-2  
5.1.2.17 Identify system cleanliness requirements and describe the methods used to prevent foreign material from entering systems and componentsPPTForeign Material Exclusion
5.1.2.18 Identify industrial safety measures necessary for work in the vicinity of specific operating equipment including job aspects related to identifying, diagnosing and repairing system and component problems and using plant procedures and drawingsCH-07-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16  PPTElectrical Prints and Drawings


PPTBasic Print Reading

PPTMechanical Print Readings

PPTMechanical Print Reading (2)

PPTPlant Status


DOC Fire Detection and Protection Instructor Notes
5.1.2.19 Identify proper rigging and lifting techniques for major components such as pumps and motorsPPTHoists and Cranes

PPTInitial Riggings
5.1.2.20 Identify where the use of special tools or equipment (for example, cranes, scaffolding, breaker grounding devices) will be required and describe how they will be used during work on various componentsPPTHoists and Cranes

PPTInitial Riggings

PPTSwitchgear & Motor Control Centers
5.1.2.21 Identify repair and surveillance procedures that will be used on the jobPPTPlant Status

PPTInitial Riggings
5.1.2.22 Describe science concepts and work requestsPPTContamination Controln Dcontamination Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines


PPTPlant Status

DOCPrimary Systems


PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTProtection Against Radiation
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5.1.2.2 PLANT AND COMPONENT SKILLS: Maintenance Student Describe the in-depth knowledge required for specific jobs tailored to maintenance personnel. (Plant Specific)
5.1.2.2.1 Perform the following in a controlled environment such as a laboratory or shop area using station procedures specific to the maintenance discipline (plant specific):
5.1.2.2.1.1 apply cleanliness requirements and maintain debris control (for example, cover openings, account for tools, clean surfaces)
5.1.2.2.1.2 calibrate and test instrument loops
5.1.2.2.1.3 cut and replace gaskets
5.1.2.2.1.4 cut fasteners to length and clean threads
5.1.2.2.1.5 crimp and heat-shrink lugs and splices
5.1.2.2.1.6 devise appropriate rigging and lifting strategies
5.1.2.2.1.7 demonstrate assembly and disassembly methods
5.1.2.2.1.8 demonstrate adjustment and calibration practices
5.1.2.2.1.9 demonstrate repair (for example, adjustment, filing, cleaning) and replacement techniques
5.1.2.2.1.10 inspect and maintain environmentally qualified components and equipment
5.1.2.2.1.11 install piping and conduit supports
5.1.2.2.1.12 install tubing and make up fittings, including capillary instrumentation and instrument valves
5.1.2.2.1.13 lubricate components such as couplings, bearings, motors and valves
5.1.2.2.1.14 maintain parts accountability
5.1.2.2.1.15 operate shop machinery and equipment
5.1.2.2.1.16 perform or simulate post maintenance tests
5.1.2.2.1.17 place compressed gas containers into and out of operations
5.1.2.2.1.18 replace and torque fittings, bolts and other fasteners
5.1.2.2.1.19 replace components such as switches, circuit boards and valve internals
5.1.2.2.1.20 replace and clean filter elements
5.1.2.2.1.21 remove and add refrigerant to air-conditioning systems
5.1.2.2.1.22 remove corrosion from surfaces
5.1.2.2.1.23 select and use tools
5.1.2.2.1.24 use appropriate measuring and test equipment properly (for example, indicator, megger, decade box)
5.1.2.2.1.25- wrap and tape wire
5.1.2.2.2 Describe the following components, equipment and related topics (plant specific):
5.1.2.2.2.1 air handlers
5.1.2.2.2.2 chillers
5.1.2.2.2.3 cleanliness, radiological exposure and contamination control methods
5.1.2.2.3.a simulated foreign material exclusion
5.1.2.2.4 compressors
5.1.2.2.5 control of administrative activities such as completing a work order and providing turnover status to other maintenance personnel
5.1.2.2.6 diesel generators
5.1.2.2.7 effects of changes
5.1.2.2.7a processors
5.1.2.2.7b sensors
5.1.2.2.7c controllers
5.1.2.2.7d adjustments
5.1.2.2.7e calibrations
5.1.2.2.7f tests
5.1.2.2.8 electrical equipment
5.1.2.2.8a circuit breakers
5.1.2.2.8b battery chargers
5.1.2.2.8c inverters
5.1.2.2.8d relays
5.1.2.2.8e transformers
5.1.2.2.8f conductor splicing and terminating
5.1.2.2.9 filters, educators, traps and heat exchangers
5.1.2.2.9a breaching systems and exercise repair, replacement and testing techniques
5.1.2.2.10 human factors problems associated with plant equipment such as inadequate component labeling and working on components from difficult orientations
5.1.2.2.11 influences of harsh environmental conditions such as low lighting and tight working clearances
5.1.2.2.12 instrumentation and processors
5.1.2.2.12a control systems (level, pressure and temperature)
5.1.2.2.13 medium-sized pump and motor packages similar to component cooling or charging water pump assemblies
5.1.2.2.13a seal, bearing and coupling components
5.1.2.2.13b bolt torquing and foreign material exclusion
5.1.2.2.14 oral communications with station personnel involved with maintenance activities
5.1.2.2.15 packing replacement and adjustment
5.1.2.2.16 rotating and processing conditioning equipment
5.1.2.2.17 signal processing equipment
5.1.2.2.17a nuclear instrument cabinets
5.1.2.2.17b radiation monitoring components
5.1.2.2.17c reactor protection system panels
5.1.2.2.18 use of operating experience information
5.1.2.2.19 valves and valve actuators
5.1.2.2.20 valve mockups
5.1.2.2.20a ball, butterfly, gate, globe, check and relief valves
5.1.2.2.20b disassembly and assembly
5.1.2.2.20c cleaning
5.1.2.2.20d lubricating
5.1.2.2.20e inspecting
5.1.2.2.20f seat machining
5.1.2.2.21 valve actuators repair and testing
5.1.2.2.21a motor
5.1.2.2.21b pneumatic
5.1.2.2.21c solenoid
5.1.2.2.22 verification of important safety and status control functions such as checking the tagged boundary and performing an independent verification
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5.2 DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC CURRICULUM FOR MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL: MECHANICAL MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS Describe the component types and characteristics, common failure mechanisms, and operating principles of plant components (generic training on power plant machinery/equipment will be followed by plant-specific-training and qualification).
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5.2.1 Describe the operation and use of the following:
5.2.1.1 b structural componentsME-08-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  
5.2.1.1a typesME-08-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  
5.2.1.1b structural componentsME-08-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  
5.2.1.1c accessories/support systemsME-08-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  
5.2.1.2 compressors including rotary, reciprocating and centrifugalME-06-1, 2, 3, 4  
5.2.1.3 b moving componentsME-11- 1, 2  
5.2.1.3a structural componentsME-11- 2  
5.2.1.3b moving componentsME-11- 1, 2  
5.2.1.3c accessories/support systemsME-11-7  
5.2.1.4 heat exchangersIC-03-5 IC-04-3, 4, 5 IC-05-3  
5.2.1.5 d auxiliary support equipment (such as cooling water heat exchangers, auxiliary impellers and drain systems)ME-02-21  
5.2.1.5a components (such as seals, couplings and gear boxes)ME-02-3  
5.2.1.5b applicationsME-02-12, 13, 17, 18, 19  
5.2.1.5c impact of environmental conditions (such as dust and moisture)ME-02-20  
5.2.1.5d auxiliary support equipment (such as cooling water heat exchangers, auxiliary impellers and drain systems)ME-02-21  DOCChemical and Oily Waste Water

DOCExtraction Steam and Heater Drain Instructor Notes

DOCFuel Pool Cooling and Cleanup System Instructor Notes

5.2.1.6 strainers, filters and traps (such as demineralizers, screens and centrifuges)ME-05-1, 2  
5.2.1.7 steam trapsME-04-1 ME-05-1, 2  
5.2.1.8 steam turbinesME-10-5, 6  
5.2.1.8a constructionME-10-2, 3, 4, 5,  
5.2.1.8b main componentsME-10-2, 3, 4  
5.2.1.8c accessories/support systemsME-10-8  
5.2.1.9 structural and auxiliary equipmentPPTAuxiliary Mechanical Equipment
5.2.1.9a hangers and snubbersME-12-1  
5.2.1.9b hoists and cranesPPTElevator Systems, Hoists & Cranes

PPTHoists and Cranes

PPTInitial Riggings
5.2.1.9c boilersPPTBoilers and Thermic Fluid Heaters

5.2.1.10 valves and dampersME-01-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ME-08-12,  PPTValves

PPTPneumatic Control Valves
5.2.1.10a applicationsME-01-5, 8, 9 ME-08-12,  
5.2.1.10b functionsME-01-1, 5, 8, 9,  
5.2.1.10c componentsME-01-2, 3, 9  
5.2.1.10d position indicationME-01-13, 14, 15  
5.2.1.10e actuatorsIC-06-1  
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5.2.2 Explain the following systems in detail:
5.2.2.1 auxiliary feedwater or reactor core isolation cooling systemsDOC Auxiliary Feedwater System


PPTAuxiliary Feedwater System Powerpoint/a>


PPT
Digital Feedwater Control Systems


PDFDigital Feedwater Control Systems/a>
5.2.2.2 auxiliary steam systems, including boilersPPTBoilers and Thermic Fluid Heaters
5.2.2.3 chemical volume control or reactor water cleanup systemsPPTChemical and Volume Control System

5.2.2.4 chilled water systemsPPTChilled Water Systems
5.2.2.5 circulating water systemsPPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems
5.2.2.6 condensate, feedwater and polisher (demineralizer) systemsPPTChemistry and Radcon


PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems

PPTWater Treatment

DOC Condensate and Feedwater Systems Instructor Notes


PPTDigital Feedwater Control Systems

PDFDigital Feedwater Control Systems
5.2.2.7 charging water or control rod drive hydraulics systemsPPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOC Chemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
5.2.2.8 fire water systems, including pumps and special valvesPPTFire Protection System

PPTFire Detection & Protection System


DOCFire Detection and Protection Instructor Notes

DOC Fire Protection System Water Protection Instructor Notes

5.2.2.9 instrument and station air systemsDOCPrimary Systems


PPT
Air Systems


5.2.2.10 systems that contain important valvesDOCPrimary Systems

PPTAuxiliary Feedwater System Powerpoint

PPTBoiling Water Reactor Systems
5.2.2.11 other systems important to plant operations, such as those covered by technical specificationsPPTChemistry and Radcon


PPTPlant Status
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5.2.3 Perform the following specialized tasks (plant specific)
5.2.3.1 close tolerance machining
5.2.3.2 disassembling and reassembling the reactor vessel head and internals
5.2.3.3 establishing freeze seals
5.2.3.4 installing and removing reactor cavity seal
5.2.3.5 installing and using reactor pressure vessel stud tensioners
5.2.3.6 overhauling and repairing the control rod drive mechanism
5.2.3.7 overhauling the emergency diesel
5.2.3.8 plugging steam generator tubes (PWR)
5.2.3.9 removing and replacing control rod drive mechanism seals
5.2.3.10 replacing reactor coolant pump mechanical seal (PWR)
5.2.3.11 replacing reactor recirculation pump mechanical seal (BWR)
5.2.3.12 reactor internal pump maintenance (ABWR)
5.2.3.13 reduction gear and gear drive work
5.2.3.14 handling specialized rigging operations for jobs such as reactor vessel disassembly or main turbine maintenance
5.2.3.15 installing, inspecting and removing scaffolding
5.2.3.16 silverplating, electroplating
5.2.3.17 steam generator tube plug welding (PWR)
5.2.3.18 tempering and annealing
5.2.3.19 overhauling and aligning the turbine
5.2.3.20 welding (electric arc, gas, inert gas, metal spray)
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5.3 DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC CURRICULUM FOR MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL: ELECTRICAL TECHNICIANS Describe and explain electrical equipment, common failure mechanisms, and operating principles of plant components and be able to apply this knowledge. Generic training on power plant machinery/equipment will be followed by plant-specific training and qualification.
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5.3.1 Diagnose problems and perform maintenance on the following equipment (plant specific)
5.3.1.1 electrical supply components
5.3.1.1a switchgear, load centers and motor control centers
5.3.1.1b transformers
5.3.1.1c inverters and uninterruptible power supplies
5.3.1.1d circuit breakers
5.3.1.1e batteries and chargers
5.3.1.2 electrical control components
5.3.1.2a relays
5.3.1.2b meters
5.3.1.2c control circuits
5.3.1.2d cables
5.3.1.3 resistive electrical equipment
5.3.1.3a heaters
5.3.1.3b heat tracing
5.3.1.4 rotating equipment
5.3.1.4a motors
5.3.1.4b generators
5.3.1.4c motor-generators
5.3.1.5 structural and auxiliary equipment
5.3.1.5a hoists and cranes
5.3.1.5b fire barriers
5.3.1.5c electric boilers
5.3.1.5d elevators
5.3.1.6 valve actuators
5.3.1.6a manual operation
5.3.1.6b testing
5.3.1.6c position indication
5.3.1.6d environmental impact
5.3.2 Explain detailed construction and use of the following:
5.3.2.1 battery systemsES-07-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14  
5.3.2.2 cathodic protection systemsPPTCathodic Protection Systems
5.3.2.3 electrical distribution, including alternating and direct current systemsES-01-3 ES-02-1, 6 ES-03-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 ES-08-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ES-10-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ES-14-1, 2  PPTPlant Overview--Motors
5.3.2.4 emergency power systemsPPTEmergency Power Systems
5.3.2.5 generator excitation and control systemsES-05-1, 8, 11, 12, 13  
5.3.2.6 protective relaying systemsES-14-2, 3  PPTPlant Status
5.3.2.7 reactor protection and containment isolation systemsPPTResidual Heat & Reactor Operation

PPTContainment

PPTReactor Protection System

PPTGaseous Radwaste
5.3.2.8 station heat tracing systems>

PPTResidual Heat & Reactor Operation
5.3.2.9 systems that include large motors such as the reactor coolant, circulating water, service water, condensate and emergency core cooling systems DOC Primary SystemsPPTPPTPlant Overview--Motors

DOCPrimary Systems

PPT Main Circulating Water & Condensate Systems
PPT
Emergency Power Systems

PPTCondensate and Feedwater Systems Instructor Notes
5.3.2.10 transformer systems and auxiliariesES-11- 12, 13, 14, 16  
5.3.2.11 other systems import to plant operations such as those covered by technical specificationsPPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTPlant Status
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5.3.3 Perform the following specialized tasks (plant specific)
5.3.3.1 breaker operation, setting, adjustment and repair
5.3.3.2 motor-operated valve diagnostic testing
5.3.3.3 motor overhauls
5.3.3.4 high potential (hi-pot) tests
5.3.3.5 stress relief of major components
5.3.3.6 high voltage connection preparation
5.3.3.7 relay setting, adjustment, calibration and repair
5.3.3.8 special soldering
5.3.3.9 tempering and annealing
5.3.3.10 battery load testing
5.3.3.11 switchgear testing
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5.4 DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC CURRICULUM FOR MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL: INSTRUMENT & CONTROL TECHNICIANS Describe general systems and components, focusing on the in-depth knowledge required for specific jobs tailored to the individual maintenance discipline. Building on the general system and component knowledge, describe the in-depth requirements for specific jobs tailored to the instrument and control maintenance discipline. Plant generic training on power plant machinery/equipment will be followed by plant-specific training and qualification.
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5.4.1 Describe the following (generic):
5.4.1.1 advanced electronics theory, including operational amplifiers, integrated circuits and solid state circuitryPPTElectronic Controls

All About Circuts
5.4.1.2 digital electronics, including the different type of logics used and methods for programming and controlling circuit timingPPTElectronic Controls

PPTReactor Regulating Systems
All About Circuts

Time Delay Relays
5.4.1.3 electrical circuit and instrument loop schematicsES-03-4 ES-10-15  PPTLoop Calibration, Control & Troubleshooting

PPTElectrical Prints and Drawings
All About Circuts
5.4.1.4 pneumatic and hydraulic valve operator fundamentalsIC-06- 1  PPTElectronic Controls

PPTValves and Operation

PPTPneumatic Control Valves

PPTValves
Kirk, F.W., Weedon, T.A. and Kirk, P. Instrumentation, 5th ed. Homewood, Il; American Technical Publishers, Inc., 2010, ch.39-41, ch. 43, p. 516  
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5.4.1.5 principles of operation for the following types of radiation detectors:
5.4.1.5e fission chamberIC-09-10  PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOCRadiaton Detection Principles and Instruments_Instructor Notes


PPTValves

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOCRad measurement Lab Counting Instruments Lesson Plan

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes
5.4.1.5f self-powered neutron detectorIC-09- 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15  PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Lesson Plan

PDFSelf-Powered Neutron Detectors
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5.4.2 Diagnose problems and perform maintenance on the following components (plant specific)
5.4.2.1 electronic equipment
5.4.2.1a computers/microprocessors
5.4.2.1b analyzers
5.4.2.1c signal converters
5.4.2.2 electrical components
5.4.2.2a power supplies
5.4.2.2b transformers
5.4.2.2c breakers
5.4.2.2d relays
5.4.2.3 fire barriers
5.4.2.4 hoists and cranes
5.4.2.5 instrumentation components, including problems associated with placing components into or out of service (such as valving transmitters being placed into service)
5.4.2.5a sensors and detectors
5.4.2.5b transmitters and indicators
5.4.2.5c recorders and annunciators
5.4.2.5d controllers and positioners
5.4.2.6 structural and auxiliary equipment
5.4.2.7 valve actuators
5.4.2.7a manual operations
5.4.2.7b alignment for remote control and/or automatic operation
5.4.2.7c testing
5.4.2.7d position indication
5.4.2.7e impact of environmental conditions
5.4.3 Describe the following:
5.4.3.1 emergency core cooling systems including actuation instrumentationPPTFire Protection System

DOCPrimary Systems

PPTPlant Status


DOCFuel Pool Cooling and Cleanup System Lesson Plan

DOCReactor Coolant System Lesson Plan


DOCSafe Shutdown Cooling Water Systems Lesson Plan
5.4.3.2 extraction steam control systemsPPTNuclear Plant Systems

DOCMain Steam System Lesson Plan

DOCExtraction Steam and Heater Drain Lesson Plan

DOCPrimary Systems

DOCExtraction Steam and Heater Drain Instructor Notes
5.4.3.3 fire protection systemsPPTFire Protection System

PPTFire Detection & Protection System


DOCFire Detection and Protection Lesson Plan

DOCFire Protection System Water Protection Lesson Plan

DOCFire Protection System Water Protection Instructor Notes

DOC
Fire Protection Carbon Dioxide System Lesson Plan

DOCFire Protection Carbon Dioxide System Instructor Notes

DOCFire Protection System Halon Instructor Notes

DOCFire Protection System Halon Lesson Plan

DOCFire Detection and Protection Instructor Notes/a>
5.4.3.4 feedwater control systemsDOCPrimary Systems

DOCAuxiliary Feedwater System

DOCCondensate And Feedwater Systems Lesson Plan

PPTDigital Feedwater Control Systems


PDFDigital Feedwater Control Systems
5.4.3.5 instrument air systems, including major pneumatically-operated componentsPPTPneumatic Instruments


PPTPneumatic Control Valves


5.4.3.6 neutron monitoring systemsIC-09-11, 12, 14  PPTNeutron Monitoring

PDFExcore Neutron Flux Monitoring System

PDF Safety Channel Excore Lesson Plan
5.4.3.7 radiation monitoring systemsIC-09-1, 9  
5.4.3.8 reactor protection systemsDOCPrimary Systems

PPTReactor Protection System
5.4.3.9 reactivity control instrumentation systems, such as rod control in pressurized water reactors and recirculation flow control in boiling water reactorsPPTResidual Heat & Reactor Operation

PPT
Reactor Operations


DOCPrimary Systems

PPTReactor Regulating Systems

PDFReactor Regulating System Lesson Plan

5.4.3.11 other engineered safeguards instrumentation systems such as the containment isolation systemsDOCPrimary Systems

PPTContainment

PPTReactor Protection System

PPTRP Technician Training Engineering Controls

PPT
Gaseous Radwaste
5.4.3.12 other systems important to plant operations such as those covered by the technical specificationsPPTChemistry and Radcon

DOCPrimary Systems


PPTPlant Status
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5.4.4 Troubleshoot and repair the following systems and equipment (plant specific)
5.4.4.1 analytical equipment
5.4.4.2 circuit boards
5.4.4.3 computers
5.4.4.4 nuclear instruction systems
5.4.4.5 reactor protection and engineered safeguard systems
5.4.4.6 rod control and rod position indication equipment
5.4.4.7 turbine control system
5.4.4.8 variable-speed pump controls