Radiological Protection Technicians

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3.0 DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC CURRICULUM FOR RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION TECHNICIANS
3.1 Plant Systems and Components Knowledge: Systems Explain the principles and describe the components associated with various systems. (These topics build on the general system and component knowledge that is part of the Basic Systems Knowledge curriculum and focus on the in-depth knowledge required for the radiological protection technician discipline.)
3.1.1 Explain the importance of the following systems to plant safety and radioactivity containment and identify any radiological hazards and precautions associated with maintenance tasks for each
3.1.1.1 chemical and volume control (PWR)DOCPrimary Systems

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems Lesson Plan

PPT Pressurizer and PRT

DOC Chemical and Oily Waste Water
3.1.1.2 circulating waterPPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems Lesson Plan

3.1.1.3 condensate containmentPPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems


PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

DOCCondensate and Feedwater Systems Instructor Notes

3.1.1.4 containment sprayPPTBoiling Water Reactor System


PPTPlant Status

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.5 control rod drive mechanismPPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.6 emergency core cooling systemsDOCPrimary Systems

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems Lesson Plan

3.1.1.7 environmental monitoringPPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOC Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

3.1.1.8 feedwaterPPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

DOCCondensate and Feedwater Systems Instructor Notes

PPTDigital Feedwater Control Systems

3.1.1.9 main steamPPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Steam System

DOCMain Steam Instructor Notes


PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

3.1.1.10 off-gas (BWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTMain Circulating Water & Condensate Systems

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

3.1.1.11 post-accident samplingPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTPost Accident Sampling

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.12 pressurizer (PWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

DOCReactor Coolant System Instructor Notes
3.1.1.13 pressurizer relief (PWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor System


PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.14 radiation monitoringDOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.15 reactor coolantIC-02-3  PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan

DOCReactor Coolant System Instructor Notes
3.1.1.16 reactor water clean-up (BWR)PPTPlant Chemistr Overview

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.17 recirculation (BWR)DOCDOC Primary Systems

PPTBoiling Water Reactor System
PPT
Plant Status

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.18 residual heat removal/shutdown coolingNS-04-6, 7
NS-08-7, 8  
PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
3.1.1.19 suppression pool (BWR)PPTBoiling Water Reactor System

PPTChemical and Volume Control System

DOCChemical and Volume Control Systems_Lesson Plan
Plant specific (Included plant internship Training)
• Auxiliary feedwater (PWR)
• Closed cooling water systems
• Containment iodine removal
• Containment isolation  and cooling
• Containment pressure relief
• Containment purge
• Fine motion control rods (ABWR)
• Fuel handling equipment
• Fuel pool cooling
• Gross failed fuel detector
• Hydrogen recombiner and purge
• Ice condenser (PWR)
• In-core detectors (PWR)
• Instrument and control
• Isolation condenser (BWR)
• Penetration cooling
• Plant ventilation
• Pumps and seals
• Radioactive sump
• Radwaste
• Reactor internal pumps (ABWR)
• Standby liquid control (BWR)
• Sub atmospheric pressure containment operation
• Transverse in core probes (BWR)
• Waste gas decay (PWR)
• Waste treatment
• Water treatment
• Valve actuators
• Valve Packing
• Valve types
3.1.2 Draw a basic system block diagramPPTElectrical Distribution

PPT Basic Print Reading

PPTElectrical Prints and Drawings

PPTPlant Status

PPTMechanical Print Reading

PPTMechanical Print Reading (2)

PPTOverview of Nuclear Plant Systems
3.1.3 Identify conditions that preclude safe work in the vicinity of system componentsPPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.1.4 Identify the basic interrelationships with other plant systemsPPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTMechanical Print Reading

PPTMechanical Print Reading (2)

PPTMain Steam System

DOC Main Steam Instructor Notes
KEEP
3.2 TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
KEEP
3.2.1 General Tools and Test Equipment (Plant Specific)
3.2.1.1 Explain procedures to check out and return radioactive contaminated tools and test equipment.
3.2.1.2 Identify those tools and equipment that may not be taken into radiologically controlled environments without specific controls in place.
3.2.1.3 Identify power sources that may be connected to tools and test equipment.
3.2.1.4 Explain the requirements for instruments and test equipment calibration.
3.2.1.5 Explain how to determine tool and equipment calibration status.
3.2.1.6 Describe proper methods of protecting tools and test equipment for the following:
3.2.1.6.1 In a radiologically controlled area
3.2.1.6.2 In a confined space
3.2.1.6.3 When working from heights
3.2.1.6.4 When working near open systems
3.2.2 Radiation Detection and Measurement Principles Discuss the basic theory of operation and operating characteristics of detectors, to include instrument efficiency, the factors that affect instrument efficiency, and the calculation of efficiency from given information; the effects of background radiation; and differentiation between the operating characteristics of a radiation field survey instrument and a radioactive contamination survey instrument.
3.2.2.1 Explain the function of an ion chamber, proportional counter, alpha scintillation detectors, plastic scintillation detectors and Geiger-Mueller counterIC-09- 4, 5, 6, 7,  PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Lecture Notes

PPTInstrumentation Review

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Instructor Notes

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement

PPTRad Measurements Instruments
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
3.2.2.2 Draw and explain gas-filled detector six region curve, including gas amplificationIC-09- 2, 3  DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Lecture Notes

PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRad Measurements Instruments


DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibration and Data Analysis"  
3.2.2.3 Explain the function of a scintillation (micro-r meters, liquid scintillation counters, zinc-sulfide alpha counters and probes), fission chamber and semiconductors (high-purity germanium, electronic dosimeters)IC-09-1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Lecture Notes

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Instructor Notes

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
3.2.3 Radiological Survey and Analysis Instruments
3.2.3.1 Explain the operating characteristics and basic electrical circuitry of each survey instrumentPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
3.2.3.2 Perform and describe operational checks on survey instruments, such as battery, zero, source, response, background and calibrationPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
3.2.3.3 Identify conditions that might affect survey instrument response, including the following:
3.2.3.3.1 atmospheric pressurePPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.2 extreme temperaturesPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.3 geotropismPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.4 high humidityPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.5 mixed radiation fieldsPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.6 noble gas atmospheresPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.7 off-scale readingPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.3.8 radiofrequency interferencePPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments
3.2.3.4 Identify the instruments available for performing radiation surveys and demonstrate proficiency in using the instruments (plant specific)
3.2.3.5 Describe plant requirements for documentation of radiation surveys, including the use of survey maps, the review of completed surveys, the retention of records and the updating of area maps and postings (plant specific)
3.2.3.6 Explain actions to be taken if radiation levels are off scale on the instrument in use (plant specific)
3.2.3.7 Select the appropriate instrument for performance of radiation surveys under various conditions, based on expected radiation types, expected dose rate and environmental conditions (plant specific)
3.2.3.8 Identify the instruments available for performing contamination surveys such as the following:
3.2.3.8.1 alpha scintillation detectorsIC-09- 7  PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

PPTInstrumentation Review

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Instructor Notes

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
3.2.3.8.2 Geiger-Mueller tubesIC-09- 6  PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

PPTInstrumentation Review

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Instructor Notes
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
3.2.3.8.3 plastic scintillation detectorsIC-09- 7  PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Instructor Notes
3.2.3.8.4 proportional countersIC-09- 5  PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

PPTInstrumentation Review

DOCEnvironmental Sample Counting Using Proportional Counters

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Instructor Notes
KEEP
3.2.3.9 Explain the effect of background radiation on the ability to detect low levels of contamination (plant specific including plant limits applicable to each instrument type)
3.2.3.10 Explain how to obtain and record dose rates from mixed radiation fields (plant specific)
3.2.3.11 Define general area and contact dose rates (plant specific - identify each on survey maps)
3.2.3.12 Convert meter indications of contamination detection equipment to contamination levels in standard units (cpm to dpm/100cm2)PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments
3.2.3.13 Demonstrate proper techniques for surveying an item for contamination (loose and fixed) using a hand-held friskerPPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control Lesson Plan
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
KEEP
3.2.3.14 Describe plant requirements for documentation of contamination surveys, including the use of survey maps, the review of completed surveys, the retention of records and the updating of area maps and postings (plant specific)
3.2.3.15 Estimate contamination levels when indications are off scale on contamination detection equipment (plant specific)
3.2.3.16 Explain the operating characteristics and basic electrical circuitry of counting and spectroscopy equipment (such as proportional counters, liquid scintillation detectors, high-purity germanium, zinc sulfide detectors)IC-09-1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTLaboratory Instrumentation

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
3.2.3.17 Perform and describe operational checks on counting and spectroscopy equipment resolution, source, response and backgroundPPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

3.2.3.18 Identify unusual conditions that might affect counting and spectroscopy equipment response such as high humidity, abnormal background, electronic noise and extreme temperaturePPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes

PPTRad Measurements Instruments
3.2.3.19 Describe the statistical nature of radioactive decay as it relates to uncertainties encountered when measuring radioactivity (such as normal distribution curves, standard deviations, confidence levels, lower limits of detection and minimum detectable activity)PPTPPT Statistics: Dealing with Uncertainty

PPTPPT Counting Statistics

DOCDOC Counting Statistics Instructor Notes
3.2.3.20 Identify factors that affect the statistical accuracy of radioactivity measurements, including count rate, background, count time, equipment efficiency, sample volume and sample geometry. Explain how the statistical accuracy of measurements can be improvedPPTPPT Statistics: Dealing with Uncertainty

PPTPPT Radiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTPPT Detector Efficiency

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

PPTPPT Counting Statistics

DOCCounting Statistics Instructor Notes
3.2.3.21 Define the lower limit of detection (LLD)PPTPPT Detector Efficiency
3.2.3.22 Perform LLD and minimum count rate calculations for various radioactivity measurementsPPTPPT Detector Efficiency
KEEP
3.2.3.23 Explain the operating characteristics and use of the following radiological survey and analysis instruments:
3.2.3.23.1 alpha survey instrumentPPTPPT Portable Radiation Survey Instruments/a>





3.2.3.23.2 beta/gamma survey instrumentPPTPPT Portable Radiation Survey Instruments/a>
3.2.3.23.3 friskerPPTPPT Portable Radiation Survey Instruments/a>
3.2.3.23.4 gamma survey instrumentPPTPPT Portable Radiation Survey Instruments/a>
3.2.3.23.9 multichannel analyzer (gamma spectrometer)IC-09- 8,  
3.2.3.23.10 neutron survey instrumentPPTPPT Portable Radiation Survey Instruments/a>
3.2.3.23.11 proportional countersPPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

PPTPPT Laboratory Instrumentation

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 7, "Radiation Detectors"  
3.2.3.24 Explain the principles of operation of area radiation monitoring systemsIC-09-1, 9  DOCRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments Lecture Notes

3.2.3.25 Explain the principles of operation of process radiation monitoring systemsIC-09-1, 9  
KEEP
3.2.3.26 Identify the locations of the area and process radiation monitoring systems and their associated components (plant specific)
3.2.3.27 Identify unusual conditions that might affect radiation monitoring systems response such as high humidity, abnormal background, mixed radiation fields and temperature effectsIC-09-1, 9  
KEEP
3.2.3.28 Explain the operating characteristics and use of monitoring devices including the following monitors:
3.2.3.28.8 personnel whole-body contaminationPPTPPT Protection Against Radiation

PPTPPT Personnel Monitoring
KEEP
3.2.4 SAMPLE COLLECTION EQUIPMENT Identify the types and describe the application of sample collection equipment:
3.2.4.1 Describe the application and explain the principles of operations of each type of sample collection equipmentPPT Air Sampling

PPT Airborne Radioactivity Surveys

DOC Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOC Airborne Radioactivity Surveys

KEEP
3.2.4.2 Identify the locations of each type of sample collection equipment (plant specific)
3.2.4.3 Describe identifying isotopes and quantifying radioactivity present in samples (plant specific - describe plant procedures for)
3.2.4.4 Convert detection equipment indications to airborne radioactivity in standard units (Ci/cm3) and in derived air concentration, to specific activity (CI/ml) for liquid samples , or to specific activity (Ci/g) for solid samplesPPTPPT Air Sampling

PPT PPT Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOC Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOC Airborne Radioactivity Surveys
KEEP
3.2.4.5 Operate the following air sampling equipment and describe when each is used:
3.2.4.5.1 continuous air monitorsDOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys

PPTContinuous Air Monitors
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation,Appx, p.723, 778 H.J.Moe, Operational Health Physics Training, Argonne National Laboratory, Argon, Illinois, 1992, p. 14-16 "Continuous Air Monitors "  
3.2.4.5.2 high volume samplersPPTPPT Air Sampling

PPT PPT Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOC Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys

PPTContinuous Air Monitors

PPTHigh and Low Volume Samplers

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 10, "Environmental Monitoring Programs and Equipment", p.430  
3.2.4.5.3 low volume samplersPPTPPT Air Sampling

PPT PPT Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOC Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys

PPTContinuous Air Monitors

PPTHigh and Low Volume Samplers
KEEP
3.2.4.6 Perform sampling of liquids, viscous liquids, multiple interfaced liquids, resins, sludge, soil, and snow (plant specific).
3.2.4.7 Collect samples using planchettes, beakers (for example, Marinelli) and post-accident filter assembly (plant specific)
3.2.5 CALIBRATION SOURCES AND EQUIPMENT Explain calibration procedures
3.2.5.1 Describe procedures for use of calibration source. (plant specific)
3.2.5.2 Discuss the type of equipment required to calibrate plant survey instruments and radiation monitors.PPTMeasuring Pressure

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments
3.2.5.3 Discuss the type of equipment required to calibrate counting and spectroscopy equipment.PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments
3.2.5.4 Describe the precautions associated with calibration procedures and calibration source handling.PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

PPTMeasuring Pressure
3.2.5.5 Identify the criteria for proper calibration of counting and spectroscopy equipment.PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
3.2.5.6 Identify the criteria for proper calibration of survey instruments and radiation monitors.PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Laboratory Counting Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
KEEP
3.2.5.7 Demonstrate the proper use of calibration procedures as required by specification for each instrument or system. (plant specific)
3.2.5.8 Describe the use of calibration source decay curves.PPTRadiation Detection Principles & Instruments

DOCRadiation Detection and Measurement
KEEP
3.2.5.9 Describe source accountability procedures. (plant specific)
3.2.5.11 Describe disposal of sources, including licensed and nonlicensed (plant specific)
KEEP
3.3 RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION THEORY AND TECHNIQUES
KEEP
3.3.1 RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIOACTIVE DECAY Explain and apply the theory of radioactivity and radioactive decay.
3.3.1.1 Identify the types of radioactive decay (alpha, beta, gamma, electron capture and internal conversion)NS-03-2, 5, 6, 8  PPTRadioactive Decay

3.3.1.2 Use basic equations to describe each type of decay.MA-02- 2, 3, 4, 5 MA-03- 2, 3,
MA-04- 1, 2, 4, 6, 7
MA-05-1, 2, 3
, 4
MA-06-1, 2, 3 MA-10- 2, 3  
3.3.1.3 Use exponential equations and appropriate graphs (linear and semi-log) to perform radioactive calculationsMA-05-1, 2, 3, 4 MA-06-1, 2, 3
MA-10- 2, 3  
3.3.1.4 Characterize alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, and neutrons (for example, describe the physical properties of these types of radiation).NS-01-1, 2, 3, 4, 5 NS-08-1  PPTInteractions with Matter

3.3.1.5 Describe the process of neutron activation using basic equations.MA-02- 2, 3, 4, 5 MA-03- 2, 3,
MA-04- 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 MA-05-1, 2, 3, 4 MA-06-1, 2, 3
MA-10- 2, 3  
3.3.1.6 Identify specific isotopes of concern in power reactors during operation and following shutdown (such as H-3, N-16, Ar-41, Cr-51, Mn-54, Fe-55, Co-58, Co-60, Zn-65, Kr-85, Kr-88, Zr-95, Ag-110m, I-131-135, Xe-133-135, Cs-134, Cs-137 and transuranics).NS-01- 2, 4, 5
NS-03-2, 7  
PPTTransuranic Waste Disposal

3.3.1.7 Discuss complex decay schemes, such as natural decay chains, reactor-produced decay chain, and equilibrium isotopes (secular, transient, or no equilibrium).NS-03-2, 3, 4, 5, 7  PPTRadioactive Decay

KEEP
3.3.1.9 Identify, calculate and use the following significant dose terms:
3.3.1.9.1 deepPPTExposure Rate

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTPersonnel Monitoring

PPTExternal Exposure Control

3.3.1.9.2 eye (lens, shallow, effective (using weighting factors))PPTExposure Rate

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTPersonnel Monitoring

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.1.9.3 committed (for example, using in vivo and in vitro measurements and intake retention fractions)PPTExposure Rate

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTPersonnel Monitoring

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.1.9.4 committed effective (using in vivo and in vitro measurements and intake retention fractions)PPTExposure Rate

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTPersonnel Monitoring

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.1.9.5 total effectivePPTDose Equivalent

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.1.9.6 total organ dose equivalentPPTAir Sampling

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.1.10 Equate radioactivity to dose rate through simple rules of thumb and associated calculation for various source geometries (for example, 6CEN, point source, line source, plane source).PPTExposure Rate

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
KEEP
3.3.2 SOURCES OF RADIATION Identify and quantify sources of radiation
3.3.2.1 Identify and quantify these major sources of natural background radiation: cosmic radiation, uranium, thorium decay chains, potassium 40, and radon gas, including daughter products.PPTBackground Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation
3.3.2.2 Identify and quantify the following man-made sources of background radiation: medical diagnostic x-rays, radio pharmaceuticals, consumer products (TV, luminous dials), weapons tests, and air travel.PPTBackground Radiation

PPTBiological Effects of Radiation
3.3.2.3 Identify and quantify potential sources of exposure to the public from the plant liquid and gaseous effluent releases, transportation of radioactive materials, and major accidents.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTGaseous Radwaste

KEEP
3.3.2.4 Identify and quantify the following major sources of radiation in the plant that contribute to worker exposures:
3.3.2.4.1 primary system piping and componentsDOCPrimary Systems

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.2.4.2 inside containment during power operationDOCPrimary Systems

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.2.4.3 primary system filters and demineralizersPPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTALARA for Engineers

3.3.2.4.4 radwaste process systemsPPTTransuranic Waste Disposal

PPTGaseous Radwaste

3.3.2.4.5 radiographyPPTRadiographic Testing

KEEP
3.3.3 INTERACTIONS OF RADIATION WITH MATTER
3.3.3.1 Define the following terms: excitation, ionization, secondary ionization, and specific ionization.PPTInteractions with Matter

PPTInstrumentation Review

PPTPortable Radiation Survey Instruments

DOCRadiaton Detection Principles and Instruments_Instructor Notes

PPTRad Measurements Instruments

DOCRad Measurements Instrument Instructor Notes
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-14-9, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibration and Data Analysis"  
3.3.3.2 Describe the processes and characteristics of heavy charged particle (alpha particles, protons) interaction with matter, to include energy transfer by ionization and excitation; range-energy relationship; range of alpha particles in air, water, and tissue; and specific ionization as a function of distance.NS-01-1, 2, 5
NS-03-1, 2, 3, 4, 5 NS-04-1, 2  
PPTInteractions with Matter
3.3.3.3 Describe the processes and characteristics of beta particle interactions with matter, including range-energy relationship; energy transfer by ionization, excitation, and bremsstrahlung; irregular track due to scattering; bremsstrahlung production using high atomic number absorber; and range of beta particles in air, water and tissue (content added: density thickness).PPTInteractions with Matter
3.3.3.4 Define linear energy transfer and relative stopping for beta interactions.PPTDose Equivalent

PPTExternal Exposure Control


PPTInteractions with Matter
KEEP
3.3.3.11 Perform gamma and neutron shielding calculations using the following:
3.3.3.11.1 exponential shielding equationPPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.3.11.2 half and tenthPPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.3.11.3 thickness valuesPPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Radiation Exposure Control

H.J.Moe, Operational Health Physics Training, Argonne National Laboratory, Argon, Illinois, 1992, p.8-10  
3.3.3.11.4 empirically derived graphsH.J.Moe, Operational Health Physics Training, Argonne National Laboratory, Argon, Illinois, 1992, p.8-10  
3.3.3.12 Identify common shielding practices for beta particles (low Z number materials), neutrons (hydrogenous material) and gammas (high density, high Z number materials).PPTPlant Chemistry Control

PPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.3.13 Describe the phenomenon of sky shine and the means by which it can be minimized.PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.3.14 Apply quality factors for converting dose to dose equivalent (use 10CFR20).PPTRadiographic Testing

PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTExternal Exposure Control
KEEP
3.3.4 BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO IONIZING RADIATION
3.3.4.1 Describe the mechanisms of radiation interactions with cells (primary, secondary/free radicals).PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level

DOCSkin Dose
3.3.4.2 Identify cell characteristics that affect radiosensitivity (cells with a longer dividing future, division rate, and cell type).PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level

DOCSkin Dose
3.3.4.3 Define stochastic and non-stochastic (deterministic) effects.PPTRadiographic Testing

PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level
KEEP
3.3.4.4 Explain the difference between acute and chronic radiation exposure and for each, describe the following:
3.3.4.4.1 somatic effectsPPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level
3.3.4.4.2 genetic effectsPPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level
3.3.4.4.3 teratogenic effectsPPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level
3.3.4.5 For acute exposures, describe the following: dose response relationship, acute radiation syndrome, and LD-50/30.PPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level
3.3.4.12 Discuss why radiation exposures to both individuals and groups of workers should be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.4.13 Discuss the risk to the general public from operation of a nuclear plant and compare it to other risks accepted in everyday life.PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.4.14 Discuss the risk to a declared pregnant worker and fetus.PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
KEEP
3.3.5 RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION STANDARDS Discuss and explain the historical development, purpose, and philosophy of radiation protection standards.
3.3.5.1 Discuss the historical development of radiological protection standards.
PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level

DOCThe National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements

DOCInternational Commission on Radiological Protection

DOCAmerican National Standards Institute

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.2 Explain the purpose of radiological protection standards and guidelinesPPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
KEEP
3.3.5.3 Identify the regulatory and advisory organizations that have cognizance in this area and describe the function of each.
3.3.5.3.1 International Commission on Radiation ProtectionDOCInternational Commission on Radiological Protection

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.2 National Council on Radiation Protection and MeasurementsDOCThe National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.3 International Commission on Radiation Units and MeasurementsPDFInternational Commission on Radiation Units & Measures

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.4 International Atomic Energy AgencyDOCAtomic Energy Agency

DOCInternational Atomic Energy Agency

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.5 American National Standards InstituteDOCAmerican National Standards Institute

PPT
The Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.6 Nuclear Regulatory CommissionDOCNuclear Regulatory Commission

PPT
The Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.7 Department of TransportationDOCDepartment of Transportation

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.3.8 Agreement stateDOCAgreement State

PPT
The Regulatory and Advisory Organizations
3.3.5.4 Discuss the philosophy of radiation protection limits, including the prevention of nonstochastic effects, minimization of stochastic effects, concept of acceptable risk or comparable risk, concepts of cost versus benefit and ALARA.PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level

DOCThe National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements

DOCInternational Commission on Radiological Protection
DOCAmerican National Standards Institute

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations

PPTThe Regulatory and Advisory Organizations

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines


PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTProtection Against Radiation
KEEP
3.3.5.5 Define and discuss the interrelationship among the following:
3.3.5.5.1 regulationPPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.5.5.2 regulatory guidePPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.5.5.3 NUREGPPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.5.5.4 recommendation (health physics position papers)PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.5.5.5 license conditionPPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.5.5.6 technical specificationPPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.5.6 Explain the principles and use the following standards:
3.3.5.6.1 10 CFR 19--Notices, Instructions, and Reports to WorkersPPTRadiographic Testing

PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry


PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
3.3.5.6.2 10CFR 20--Standards for Protection Against RadiationPPTRadiographic Testing

PPTRadiation Protection Postings

PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
3.3.5.6.3 10CFR 21--Reporting of Defects and NoncompliancePPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
3.3.5.6.4 10CFR 34--Licenses for Radiography and Radiation Safety Requirements for Radiographic OperationsPPTRadiographic Testing

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
3.3.5.6.5 10CFR 50--Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization FacilitiesPPTPlant Status

PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
3.3.5.6.6 10CFR 61--Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of RadwastePPTTransuranic Waste Disposal

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines
3.3.5.6.7 10CFR 71--Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive MaterialsPPTTransuranic Waste Disposal

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
U.S. NRC Part 71 Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material
3.3.5.6.8 regulatory guides applicable to power reactor radiological protection (such as RG 8.38, RG 8.13, RG 8.15)PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.5.7 Describe the organization and content of the corporate and plant health physics manuals (plant specific).
3.3.6 EXTERNAL DOSIMETRY Explain the principles of operation and methods of measuring external dose.
3.3.6.1 Describe the principles of operation and characteristics of the types of dosimetry used at the plant (thermo luminescent dosimeters, film badge, alarming dosimeters, pocket ion chamber, teledosimetry, (content added: optical-luminescent dosimeters), including the range(s) of each device, the effects of fading and drift, the advantages of each type of device, the limitations of each type of device, and radio frequency interference.PPTRadiographic Testing
3.3.6.2.1 responsibility for issue, collection, reading, and recording results
3.3.6.2.2 procedures for issuing dosimeters
3.3.6.2.3 procedure for collecting, reading, and recording results
3.3.6.2.4 quality control checks of dosimeters (plant specific)
3.3.6.3 Describe the plant calibration program for dosimetry. (plant specific)
3.3.6.4 Describe the types of dosimetry required for various work situations, (plant specific) such as entry into the restricted area; entry into the radiologically restricted area; entry into posted radiation areas, high radiation areas, or very high radiation areas; visitors; entry into areas with neutron radiation; entry into areas of non-uniform radiation fields; and planned special exposures. (Plant specific).
3.3.6.5 Describe the method and equipment used at the plant to determine doses from various types of radiation, including gamma whole-body dose, gamma extremity dose, beta skin dose, and neutron dose (plant specific).
3.3.6.6 Demonstrate the proper method for wearing dosimetry under various conditions, including determining the proper location of dosimetry.PPTPersonnel Monitoring
3.3.6.7 Read and re-zero self-reading dosimeters (pocket ion chambers, digital alarming dosimeter).PPTPersonnel Monitoring
3.3.6.8 Describe when a planned special exposure is allowed and the detailed requirements of the planned special exposure.PPTPersonnel Monitoring
KEEP
3.3.6.10 Explain the plant requirements for the use of extremity dosimetry, including conditions under which extremity dosimetry is required, (plant specific) administrative procedures for issuing and collecting extremity dosimetry, and types of extremity dosimeters (plant specific) .
3.3.6.11 Describe the plant criteria for performance of investigations of discrepancies in dosimetry readings (plant specific).
3.3.6.12 Explain actions to take in the event of abnormal situations (plant specific) such as:
3.3.6.12.1 lost thermoluminescent dosimeter, pocket ion chamber, or digital alarming dosimeter
3.3.6.12.2 damaged thermoluminescent dosimeter, pocket ion chambers, digital alarming dosimeter
3.3.6.12.3 off-scale pocket ion chambers or alarm on electronic dosimeter
3.3.6.12.4 exposure in excess of plant administrative limits or nuclear regulatory limits
3.3.6.12.5 significant difference between multiple dosimeter readings
3.3.6.13 Explain the purpose and procedures for processing NRC Form 4 and 5.PPTProtection Against Radiation
KEEP
3.3.6.14 Describe the plant exposure tracking system (plant specific)
3.3.7 INTERNAL DOSEMETRY Explain the principles of operation and methods for calculating internal dose.
3.3.7.1 Define these terms:
3.3.7.1.1 annual limit on intakePPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.1.2 derived air concentrationPPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.1.3 weighting factorsPPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.1.4 solubility classPPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.2 Explain how annual limit on intake, committed dose equivalent, committed effective dose equivalent, and the target organ relate to the appropriate derived air concentration.PPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.3 Identify the specific radionuclides of concern for assessment of internal exposures, including sources of nuclides (10FR20 appendix B), critical organ, and mode(s) of uptake and elimination (ICRP30 biokinetic models).PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.4 Identify derived air concentration values and calculate derived air concentration hours for practical situations that involve exposure of individuals to airborne radioactivity (10CFR20 Appendix B).PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTProtection Against Radiation

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys

PPTContinuous Air Monitor
3.3.7.5 Determine the total effective dose equivalent and total organ dose equivalent and explain the basis for each.PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.6 Identify the basic concepts of internal dosimetry and internal dose calculations. define biological half-life and effective half-lifePPTRadiographic Testing

PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.6.1 describe (in general terms) the models used by International Commission on Radiation Protection to assess internal dose from ingestion and inhalationDOCInternational Commission on Radiological

PPTRadiation Protection Standards & Guidelines

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.7.6.2 estimate dose to internal organs from swallowing or breathing radioactivityPPTAir Sampling

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys


PPTExternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.6.3 describe the causes of uncertainties in internal dose assessment calculationsPPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.7 Describe the means for assessing uptake of radioactivity (bioassays), including whole-body count, uninalysis, fecal analysis, nasal smears, and airborne radionuclide concentrations.PPTInternal Exposure Control
3.3.7.8 Discuss the required frequency for performance of bioassays, including initial, periodic, allowing potential uptake, and on termination.PPTInternal Exposure Control
KEEP
3.3.7.9 Describe the plant requirements for recording and retaining bioassay results. (plant specific)
3.3.7.10 Demonstrate the proper operation of the whole-body counter and describe the interpretation of the results. (plant specific)
3.3.7.11 Describe the plant requirements for monitoring and reporting internal exposure. (plant specific)
3.3.7.12 Describe the plant requirements for performing a prospective evaluation of the need for internal monitoring. (plant specific)
3.3.8 EXTERNAL EXPOSURE CONTROL Explain the methods to minimize external exposure.
3.3.8.1 State the purpose of having plant administrative limits for radiation exposure (such as margin from regulatory limits).PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.8.2 Explain the differences between general area dose rate and contact dose rate and how each is used to control exposures.PPTRadiation Protection Postings

PPTBiological Effects at the Cellular Level
3.3.8.3 Define and state the posting requirements for the the controlled area, radiologically restricted area, radiation area, high radiation area, locked high radiation area, very high radiation area, and (plant specific) hot spots.PPTRadiation Protection Postings

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.8.4 Describe techniques for controlling individual exposures during radiological work, such as the use of pocket ion chambers or alarming dosimeters to allow workers to monitor dose received, assignment of stay times, use of radiation work permits (RWP), radiological protection technician job coverage (local or video monitor), use of low does waiting areas, and use of remote electronic dosimeters.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.8.5 Describe the access controls required for entry into each level of controlled area (as applicable) (plant specific) including the following:
3.3.8.5.1 radiation work permit requirements
3.3.8.5.2 dosimetry
3.3.8.5.3 notification to Radiological Protection Department
3.3.8.5.4 instrument or alarming dosimeter
3.3.8.5.5 locked barriers
3.3.8.5.6 warning signs and lights and key controls
3.3.8.6 Perform a radiation survey and (plant specific describe plant procedures) for performance of routine radiation surveys, including the frequency of surveys, instruments to be used, areas to be surveyed, survey techniques, and documentation of results.
3.3.8.7 Describe precautions and survey techniques for entering an area where radiation levels are unknown.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
KEEP
3.3.8.8 Describe plant procedures for controlling exposure to beta radiation (plant specific).
3.3.8.10 Explain how exposure goals can be used to reduce individual and collective exposures for specific radiological jobs, for work groups, and for the plant.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.8.11 Explain the ALARA concept and how it is applied to radiological work at the plant (for example, time, distance, shielding, engineering controls and source reduction).PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRP Technician Training Engineering Controls

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTALARA for Engineers
KEEP
3.3.8.12 Identify the action levels and corresponding dose reduction steps taken based on estimated cumulative exposure (plant specific).
3.3.8.13 Describe the plant exposure reduction program for radiological work (plant specific), including the following:
3.3.8.13.1 ALARA review of proposed modifications
3.3.8.13.2 ALARA review of work packages
3.3.8.13.3 preparation of dose estimates
3.3.8.13.4 identification of dose reduction techniques
3.3.8.13.5 post-job review for lessons learned (plant specific)
3.3.8.14 Describe the concept of total risk as applied to prescription of radiological work controls.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.1 pre-job planning and preparationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.2 pre-job mock-up training for worker familiarityPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.3 review of procedures for workability and efficiencyPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.4 use of special tools to improve worker efficiencyPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.5 improvement of worker comfort by controlling environment (temperature, lighting, humidity, space)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.6 prefabrication of equipment in low-dose or no-dose areasPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.17.7 decontamination to reduce protective clothing requirementsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.19 Describe the consequences of removing permanent or temporary shielding without proper review and authorization.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls


PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.8.21 Discuss factors that determine the ultimate effectiveness of installing temporary shielding, such as the cost of installation (dollars and person-rem) versus benefit, physical space limitations, 10CFR50.59 review constraints, floor loading constraints, and pipe and pipe hanger load constraints.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Programs
PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.8.22 Evaluate the effectiveness of temporary shielding in various practical applications.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
PPT
PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.8.23.1 decontamination of major system componentsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.23.2 flushing hot spotsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.23.3 sequencing work so high dose rate items are removed from the work area early onPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.23.4 reduction of cobalt in system componentsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.8.23.5 enhanced filtration of reactor coolantPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTChemistry and Radcon
3.3.8.23.6 early boration (PWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.23.7 hydrogen peroxide (PWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.23.8 lithium control (PWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTChemistry and Radcon
3.3.8.23.9 soft shutdown (BWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.8.24 Describe components that contribute to cobalt inventory in the reactor coolant (stellite valve seats, pump bearings).PPTChemistry and Radcon

PPTALARA for Engineers
KEEP
3.3.9 CONTAMINATION CONTROL Explain and apply concepts related to contamination control.
3.3.9.1 State the plant limits for radioactive contamination for release of materials, equipment, and areas for unrestricted use. (plant specific)
3.3.9.2 State the plant limit (alarm setpoint) for radioactive contamination on personnel. (plant specific)
3.3.9.3 Define and state the posting requirements for contaminated areas. (plant specific)
3.3.9.4 Describe plant procedures for marking and packaging radioactivity contaminated materials. (plant specific)
3.3.9.5 Explain the difference between loose and fixed contamination.PPTRadiation Protection Postings

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTContamination Control


DOCContamination Control Lesson Plan

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.9.6 Discuss the reason for having lower limits for alpha contamination.PPTRadiation Protection Postings

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPTAir Sampling

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
3.3.9.7 Identify potential sources of radioactive contamination, including work operations that can generate contamination.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.9.8 Describe techniques for controlling the spread of contamination to personnel and equipment, including the following:
3.3.9.8.1 use of protective clothingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control


PPTContamination Control_Lesson Plan

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTProtection Against Radiation

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.9.8.2 packaging of contaminated materialsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
3.3.9.8.3 use of containment devicesPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
3.3.9.8.4 control of leaks from radioactive systemsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
3.3.9.8.5 decontaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

DOCContamination Control Lesson Plan


PPTRadiological Safety & Response

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
KEEP
3.3.9.9 Describe plant requirements for monitoring personnel for radioactive contamination when leaving contaminated areas, hot particle areas, the radiologically restricted area, and the plant. (plant specific)
3.3.9.10 Describe plant requirements for monitoring tools and equipment for radioactive contamination when leaving the radiologically restricted area, for unrestricted use in the radiologically restricted area, for storeage or reuse within the radioloigally restricted area, and for release from the plant (plant specific).
3.3.9.11 Perform an area contamination survey, and (plant specificdescribe plant procedures for performing routine area contamination surveys), including, including (plant specific frequency of surveys), instruments to be used, areas to be surveyed, survey techniques, and (plant spedific documentation of results.)
3.3.9.12 Describe plant procedures for performing special contamination surveys (plant specific), including radioactive particles on personnel or equipment; radioactive particles in areas; small volumes of liquid leaving the radiologically controlled area; and loose material, such as sand, leaving the raiologically controlled area (Plant specific)
3.3.9.13 Discuss the normal uses, (plant specific locations), advantages, disadvantages, and relative sensitivity of the following contamination detection devices
3.3.9.13.1 bag counters
3.3.9.13.2 conveyor-type contamination monitors
3.3.9.13.3 portable frisker
3.3.9.13.4 portal monitor
3.3.9.13.5 tool monitors
3.3.9.13.6 whole-body contamination monitor
3.3.9.14 Describe plant procedures for controlling hot particles (plant specific)
3.3.9.15 Define a full set of protective clothing under normal circumstances (plant specific)
3.3.9.16 Describe other types of protective clothing available, including conditions under which each is used, procedures for donning and removing protective clothing and inspections of clothing prior to usePPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan


PPT Protection Against Radiation
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.9.17 Describe the devices used for containment of contamination during radiological work, such as drapes, glove bags, tents, drain bottles, berms, absorbents to contain liquid and catch containmentsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

PPT Radiological Safety & Response


PPTALARA for Engineer

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.9.18 Describe methods used to protect against facial contamination such as face shield, ski-mask and specially designed hoodsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.9.19 Identify the conditions in which the use of each type of containment device is to be consideredPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

3.3.9.20 Explain the inspections that are to be performed prior to the use of containment devicesPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


3.3.9.21 Describe techniques to minimize the spread of contamination, including protective clothing requirements and precautions during use, removal of contaminated equipment, and postjob removal or decontamination of the containment device.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTProtection Against Radiation
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.9.22 Identify methods by which a work site can be prepared for the performance of highly contaminated work such as using disposable plastic; covering the work area with launderable, reusable sheeting; covering the work area with strippable paint; and painting concrete surfaces for ease in decontamination.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


3.3.9.23 Define cross-contamination and describe how it can result in the uncontrolled spread of contaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


3.3.9.24 Describe techniques to minimize the spread of contamination when contaminated materials are brought out of posted areasPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

3.3.9.25 Describe the purpose and use of a stepoff pad in controlling the spread of contaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPT Radiological Safety & Response
3.3.9.26 Discuss the generic plant requirements for entering and working in areas with contamination above plant limits, such as radiation work permits, protective clothing, use of tools for a hot tool room, step off pads, and notification of the Radiological Protection Department.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTProtection Against Radiation
KEEP
3.3.10 AIRBORNE RADIOACTIVITY CONTROL Explain the methods to control airborne radioactivity.
3.3.10.1 Identify the isotopes of primary concern for airborne radioactivity at the plant (such as H3, Co-58, C0-60, CS-134, CS-137, I-131).PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.10.2 Describe the procedures for posting areas as airborne radioactivity areas. (10CFR20)PPTRadiation Protection Postings

PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry
3.3.10.3 Explain the characteristic difference between particulate, iodine, tritium, and noble gases and how they affect the method of detecting and controlling airborne radioactivity.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.10.4 Collect airborne samples, and describe plant procedures for collecting routine airborne radioactivity samples, including the frequency of surveys, types of surveys performed (particulate, iodine, noble gas, tritium), instruments to be used, areas to be sampled, sampling techniques, and documentation of results. (plant specific)
3.3.10.5 Describe the procedure for determining the derived air concentration, derived air concentration hours, and annual limit on intake for a worker in an airborne radioactivity area.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTInternal Exposure Control

PPTAir Sampling

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
3.3.10.6 Explain the difference between low-volume, high volume, and lapel air samples, including when each is used.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTAir Sampling

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
3.3.10.7 Discuss the purpose of using a continuous air monitor and identify situations in which continuous air monitors should be used.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program
3.3.10.8 Evaluate trends in airborne radioactivity based on sampling results.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program
3.3.10.9 Identify work situations and work practices that could produce airborne radioactivity, such as opening a contaminated system; working in highly contaminated areas; grinding, cutting or welding radioactive or contaminated materials; and leaks from contaminated systems.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls


PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.10.10 Describe controls that can be used to reduce exposure to airborne radioactivity, such as the use of filtered ventilation, decontamination of areas or equipment to eliminate the source of airborne radioactivity, use of containment devices (such as tents, glove bags), and repair of leaks in contaminated systems, the performance of work under water or keeping contaminated materials wet, and use of a respirator (last resort).PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRP Technician Training Engineering Controls


PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.10.11 Identify the primary ventilation and filtration systems in the plant. (plant specific)
3.3.10.12 Identify plant requirements that must be met before an individual is issued a respirator such as training the individual in the proper use of equipment, medical evaluation, and quantitative fit test.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.10.13 Define protection factor (10CFR20).PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills


PPTKey Parts of 10 CFR for the Nuclear Industry

PPTProtection Against Radiation
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
KEEP
3.3.10.14 Identify the protection factors, advantages, and disadvantages of each type of respirator used in radiological applications at the station.
3.3.10.14.1 full-face negative pressure respiratorPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection



PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.10.14.2 full-face positive pressure respiratorPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection



PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.10.14.3 full-face air line respiratorPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.10.14.4 air line (bubble) hood respiratorPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection


PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.10.14.5 self-contained breathing apparatusPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection
PPT
Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.10.15 Describe the conditions under which each type of respiratory protection equipment must be used.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.10.16 Describe plant procedures for issue and control of respiratory protection equipment. (plant specific)
3.3.10.17 Demonstrate proper procedure for donning and removing each type of respiratory protection equipment used at the station. (plant specific)
3.3.10.18 Discuss the difference between paper filters and charcoal filters and when each is used.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.10.19 Discuss plant procedures for tracking exposure to airborne radioactivity, including levels at which tracking is required, sampling requirements, use of protection factors, documentation of exposures, timekeeping, and reporting and summing exposures. (Plant Specific)
3.3.10.20 Discuss plant requirements for entering and working in airborne radioactivity areas (plant specific), such as radiation work permit, respiratory protection equipment, and notification of the Radiological Protection Department. (Plant specific).
3.3.11 CONDUCT AND MONITORING OF RADIOLOGICAL WORK Perform and/or monitor radiological work operations.
3.3.11.1 Perform and/or monitor work in radiation areas, high radiation areas, and very high radiation areas (plant specific)
3.3.11.2 Perform and/or monitor work in areas where the potential exists for rapidly changing dose rates (plant specific), such as the spent fuel pool, during incore detector evolutions, and during radiography. (Plant specific)
3.3.11.3 Perform and/or monitor work in contaminated areas (plant specific)
3.3.11.4 Perform and/or monitor the opening of contaminated systems (plant specific)
3.3.11.5 Perform and/or monitor work in areas with airborne radioactivity or the potential for airborne radioactivity (plant specific)
3.3.11.6 Perform and/or monitor work in areas with high dose gradients (plant specific)
3.3.11.7 Describe the methods that can be used to invoke radiological protection requirements such as steps in written procedures, radiation work permits, verbal instructions from the supervisor, and verbal instructions from radiological protection personnel.:PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.11.8 Explain the responsibilities of the following personnel regarding specifying, complying with, monitoring and enforcing radiological protection and ALARA requirements:
3.3.11.8.1 workersPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.11.8.3 radiological protection technicianPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.11.8.4 radiological protection technician supervisorPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.11.9 Explain the purpose of using radiation work permits (RWPs).PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.11.10 Identify plant requirements for radiation work permits use. (plant specific)
3.3.11.11 Describe plant procedures for requesting, initiating, completing, modifying, approving, and terminating a radiation work permit. (plant specific)
3.3.11.12 Explain the difference between standing and job-specific radiation work permits and when each is used.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills


PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.11.13 Identify the information to be included on radiation work permits, such as the following:
3.3.11.13.1 scope of work covered by the RWPPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills



PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.10 radiological protection coverage and notification requirementsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills


PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.11 special precautions, restrictions, or limitationsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills


PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.2 radiation, contamination, and airborne radioactivity levelsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.3 internal and external dose action levelsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.4 location of hot spotsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.5 personnel authorized to use the RWPPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.6 dosimetry requirementsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.13.7 respiratory protection requirementsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.13.8 protective clothing requirementsPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls


PPTRadiological Safety & Response


PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.11.13.9 period during which the RWP is validPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.11.14 Describe the administrative process of signing in on an RWP. (plant specific)
3.3.11.15 Explain the purpose of having each worker read and sign the RWP.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.16 Demonstrate actions that should be taken if radiological conditions at the job site are significantly different from those shown on the RWP.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.11.17 Identify areas in the plant that require specific manager approval for entry because of extreme radiological conditions. (plant specific)
3.3.11.18 Explain actions to be taken if the work scope or work location changes from that listed on the RWP.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.19 Explain why technicians have stop-work authority and identify types of situations in which this authority is to be implemented.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.11.20 Identify the pre-job radiological survey requirements for the work operation to be performed. Based on the results of the pre-job surveys and the scope of work, identify or evaluate the need for the following:
3.3.11.20.1 a formal ALARA reviewPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls


PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.11.20.2 pre-job briefings with workersPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.20.3 type and location of whole-body dosimeters, multiple whole-body dosimeters, extremity dosimetersPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.20.4 protective clothing requirementsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation

3.3.11.20.5 respiratory protection requirementsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.20.6 special precautions or conditions to minimize the spread of contamination, reduce exposure, or minimize airborne contaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.20.8 In-process radiological surveys to be performedPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.20.9 radiological hold pointsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.11.21 Discuss plant procedures for selecting jobs for formal ALARA reviews. (plant specific)
3.3.11.22 Describe how the results of ALARA reviews are implemented (plant specific), including the documentation required, mandatory versus suggested techniques, technician and worker authority and procedure for modifying requirements, and responsibility for implementation. (Plant specific):
3.3.11.23 Discuss generic plant procedures for conducting pre-job briefings for radiological work, including when briefings are required, the frequency of briefings for continuing jobs, personnel required to attend briefings, items to be discussed in briefings, and the importance of resolving all questions in briefings.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

3.3.11.24 Explain how the type and location of whole-body dosimetry is determined for body position and dose rate gradient.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.25 Identify the criteria used to determine the need for multiple badging or for extremity monitoring.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.26 Identify measures to take when protective clothing is used in conditions that could result in heat stress.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.27 Identify and explain factors that determine the need for and type of protective clothing to be used during radiological work such as level of contamination, position of the workers, presence of airborne radioactivity, presence of liquid, type of work being performed, environmental conditions, and total risk concept.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.11.28 Identify and explain factors that determine the need for and type of respiratory equipment to be used during radiological work, such as the following:
3.3.11.28.1 levels of airborne radioactivityPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.2 type of airborne radioactivity (particulate versus gas)PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.3 levels of contamination in the work areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.4 whether work area is wet or dryPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.5 protection factor of the respiratory protection equipmentPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.6 duration of the jobPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.7 type of work being performed (welding, grinding, cutting)PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.8 impact of decreased worker efficiency due to respirator use resulting in increased whole-body dosePPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.28.9 applicability of portable ventilation in lieu of respirator usePPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRP Technician Training Engineering Controls
3.3.11.29 Describe special precautions that should be used when practical to control or reduce exposures during certain radiological conditions, such as assignment of stay times and timekeepers, continuous radiological protection technician coverage, use of alarming dosimeters or dose rate meters, use of temporary shielding, availability of low dose rate waiting areas, and removal of high dose rate sources.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.11.30 Describe precautions to be used when practical to control spread of radioactive contamination during radiological work, such as the use of containment devices, special protective clothing requirements, and the use of disposable coverings during job-site preparation.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.31 Describe precautions to be used, when practical, to control airborne radioactivity, such as special ventilation, containment devices, and work areas decontamination, as well as performing work under water or dampening the work area.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRP Technician Training Engineering Control
3.3.11.32 Evaluate the use of temporary shielding for specific job applications.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTALARA for Engineers
KEEP
3.3.11.33 Discuss the conditions under which each of the following is to be invoked during radiological work.
3.3.11.33.1 continuous radiological protection (RP) technician coveragePPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.33.2 intermittent RP technician coveragePPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

3.3.11.33.3 RP technician present at start of jobPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.33.4 no RP technician coveragePPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.33.5 advanced radiation worker coveragePPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.34 Describe the in-process radiological surveys that should be performed under various radiological conditions, including radiation surveys, contamination surveys, and airborne radioactivity surveys.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

DOCRadiation Detection Principles

PPTRadiological Controls

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
KEEP
3.3.11.35 Describe plant requirements for documentation of in-process radiological surveys. (plant specific)
3.3.11.36 Identify generic locations that should be included in process radiation surveys, such as component being worked on, nearby piping and components, location where workers are positioned, path to and from the work site, low dose areas, hot spots, and potentially transient dose rate areas (resin lines, drain lines, movement of sources).PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTGaseous Radwaste

DOC Chemical and Oily Waste Water
KEEP
3.3.11.37 Discuss plant procedures for conducting in-progress airborne radioactivity samples, including when samples are to be taken, and define the following: breathing xone and the appropriate breathing zone for varous work situations, the method of sampling (for example, low volume, high volume, lapel, or continuous air monitor), the type of sampling (for example, particulate, iodine, noble gas, or trituim), and the documentation of the results (plant specific).
3.3.11.38 Explain actions that should be taken if surveys show radiological conditions significantly different from expected, such as high contact dose rates, high general area dose rates, unexpected low dose rates, high beta dose rates, very high contamination levels, very high airborne radioactivity, and unexpected lack of airborne radioactivity.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.11.39 Discuss plant access control procedures for entry into the following for performance of work:
3.3.11.39.1 controlled areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.39.2 radiological restricted areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.39.3 restricted areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.39.4 radiation areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.39.5 high radiation areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.39.6 very high radiation areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.39.7 contaminated areaPPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.11.39.8 airborne radioactivity area (plant specific)
3.3.11.40 Describe actions required when leaving a work site upon completion of radiological work, such as packaging, marking, and transferring contaminated tools, equipment, and trash; removing protective clothing; monitoring for contamination; returning special dosimetry; signing out of the RWP; and notifying radiological protection personnel of job completion.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.11.41 Discuss proper job coverage and radiological protection measures for high exposure jobs and potential high exposure jobs, such as:
3.3.11.41.1 steam generator maintenance (PWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.2 reactor coolant pump seal replacement (PWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

DOC Primary Systems
3.3.11.41.3 reactor water cleanup pump maintenance (BWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.4 recirculation pump seal replacement (BWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.5 reactor internal pump maintenance (ABWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.11.41.6 control rod drive maintenance (BWR and ABWR)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.7 diving operationsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.8 spent resin transfer operationsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.9 spent fuel movementsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.10 in-core detector maintenancePPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.41.11 work in or around spent fuel poolPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
3.3.11.42 Demonstrate the interpersonal and human relations skills that are used to perform job coverage effectively in conditions such as the following: main control point, satellite control point, job coverage during worker performance problems, and exit point control.PPT Radioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.12 RADIOLOGICAL INCIDENT EVALUATION AND CONTROL Explain the recognition of and appropriate responses to radiological events.
3.3.12.1 Describe, in general terms, the expected response to radiological incidents, including precedence given to treating injuries, mitigation and minimization of exposure to plant personnel and the public, mitigation and minimization of damage to equipment, and notification of appropriate personnel.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTProtection Against Radiation
KEEP
3.3.12.2 Discuss the role of various plant personnel in responding to radiological incidents (plant specific), including personnel directly involved in the incident and immediately affected by it (regardless of work group), other personnel nearby but not affected, control room personnel, radiological protection technicians, radiological protection supervisors, fire brigade, auxiliary operators, and plant managers. (Plant specific).
3.3.12.3 Identify the radiological consequence that may result from various incidents, such as a sudden increase in dose rate, the uncontrolled spread of contamination, a leak or spill of contaminated liquid, an injury to an individual performing radiological work, a fire in the radiologically restricted area, the loss of a high-activity radiation source, a degraded core, and uncontrolled or unsecured high radiation areas.:PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTProtection Against Radiation

PPTFire Detection & Protection System
KEEP
3.3.12.4 Describe how to estimate beta and gamma dose rates from the following:
3.3.12.4.1 contamination on floorPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.4.2 airborne radioactivity (particulate, iodines, noble gases and tritium)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.4.3 pipes or tanks that contain radioactive liquidsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTALARA for Engineers
3.3.12.5 Describe how to estimate skin dose resulting from skin contamination including hot particles.PPTRadiological Safety & Response

DOCSkin Dose
3.3.12.6 Identify isotopes expected to be present in the event of a radiological incident.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.12.8 Estimate activity released during an incident using the following:
3.3.12.8.1 airborne activity levels in a plumePPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program


PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.8.2 contamination levels and extent of area contaminatedPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.8.3 gaseous/particulate specific activity and volume releasedPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.8.4 liquid specific activity and volume releasedPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.8.5 pre-release and post-release radiation surveys (for example, pipe, valves, tanks)PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.12.10 Identify the immediate actions to be taken to control and minimize the extent of radiological incidents such as the following:
3.3.12.10.1 alarm on electronic dosimeterPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.2 area radiation monitor alarmPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.3 contaminated injured personnelPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.4 contaminated personnelPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.5 continuous air monitor alarmPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.6 fire in the radiologically controlled areaPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

3.3.12.10.7 off-scale pocket dosimeterPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.8 contaminated liquid or resin spillPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.9 dry contaminated material spillPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.10.10 unmonitored release of radioactivity to the environmentPPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.11 Evaluate radiological incidents to identify the scope and cause.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.12 Identify follow-up actions to correct the causes of the incidents.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.13 Identify radiological surveys that should be taken as a result of an incident and the purpose of each.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
3.3.12.14 Describe how to locate and track a radioactive plume.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

DOCSpills and Contamination Events
KEEP
3.3.12.15 Describe the plant procedure for documenting radiological incidents (plant specific), such as radiological incident reports, personnel contamination reports, and operating incident reports.
3.3.12.16 Explain the importance of using trending to identify causes of individual incidents and common causes of incidents.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.12.17 Describe the types of incidents required to be documented. (plant specific)
3.3.12.18 Discuss how reports of incidents at other plants can be useful in preventing similar incidents at another plant.DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Programs

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response



PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.12.19 Describe recent significant radiological incidents at this plant or at other nuclear power plants.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.12.20 Discuss the plant emergency response plan (plant specific), including the responsibilities of various work groups, personnel accountability, emergency operations center organization, on-site and off-site radiological emergency response, and protective action guidelines for the public. (Plant specific) and
3.3.12.21 Identify the location and contents of emergency equipment kits. (plant specific)
3.3.12.22 Discuss emergency dose limits for life-saving or control of plant safety.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.13 DECONTAMINATION Explain and apply the concepts related to decontamination.
3.3.13.1 Describe the total risk concept as it applies to contamination control.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

KEEP
3.3.13.2 Describe the plant practices on when and why plant areas should be decontaminated. (plant specific)
3.3.13.3 Explain the differences between fixed and removable contamination and the resulting differences in techniques used for decontamination.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
KEEP
3.3.13.4 Identify personnel who should be notified of personnel contaminations. (plant specific)
3.3.13.5 Describe plant procedures for handling personnel shoe or clothing contamination (plant specific), including documenations required, docontamination methods, and disposition of articles that cannot be decontaminated. (Plant specific)
3.3.13.6 Describe the procedure to be followed when an individual is contaminated, including performing a contamination survey (whole-body) by radiological protection personnel; recording contamination levels, location, date, and time on personnel contamination report; (Plant specific) direct decontamination of areas above the plant limit; identifying when nasal smears and/or a whole-body count are required; documenting the final results of decontamination; and interviewing the individual to identify the source of contamination.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

DOCSpills and Contamination Events

Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.13.7 Explain the importance of tracking and trending personnel contaminations.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.13.8 Select the appropriate personnel decontamination techniques for various levels of contamination and the degree to which contamination is fixed.
3.3.13.8.1 removing particles with tapePPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.8.2 scrubbing gently with soft brushPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.8.3 shaving contaminated hairPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.8.4 sweating and chemical decontaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.8.5 washing with lukewarm water and mild detergentPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.9 Explain why hot water, cold water and abrasive cleaners are not used for personnel decontamination:PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
3.3.13.10 Identify conditions in which skin dose calculations should be performed as a result of skin contamination.PPTPersonnel Monitoring

DOCSkin Dose
3.3.13.11 Describe why some areas of the plant should not be decontaminated, such as filter galleries, high radiation areas, and hallways between contaminated areas frequently traveled by operations personnel.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.12 Identify situations in which personnel decontamination is to be referred to other appropriate personnel: contaminated wounds; contaminated eyes, ears, nose, or throat; and contamination that cannot be removed through the use of approved techniques.PPTBiological Effects of Radiation

PPTRadcon Emergency Response
3.3.13.13 Describe special procedures for decontamination of radioiodines.PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Responsee
KEEP
3.3.13.14 Discuss additional actions or notifications required if an injured person is contaminated. (plant specific)
3.3.13.15 Identify techniques available for decontamination of tools and equipment, including advantages, disadvantages, and limitations of each.
3.3.13.15.1 carbon dioxide pellet blastingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.2 chemical decontaminationPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.3 electropolishingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection
3.3.13.15.4 grit blastingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.5 high pressure water blastingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.6 ice pellet blastingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.7 low pressure water blastingPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.8 mechanical removal (grinding, machining, filing)PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.9 spray washPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.10 steam cleaningPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.11 ultrasonic cleaningPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.12 use of strippable coatingsPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.13 wiping with lint free cloth or oil-impregnated wipesPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
3.3.13.15.14 washing in non-ionic detergentPPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response
KRRP
3.3.13.16 Describe plant requirements for monitoring decontaminated equipment prior to release. (plant specific)
3.3.13.17 Discuss procedures for disposal of materials that cannot be decontaminated successfully. (plant specific)
3.3.13.18 Discuss procedures for disposal of materials used in the decontamination process, such as rags, cloths, oil-impregnated wipes, detergent solutions, and chemicals. (plant specific)
KEEP
3.3.13.19 Describe methods used for decontamination of areas within the plant, such as mopping, using oil-impregnated wipes (masslin), wiping with damp rags, vacuuming, and scrubbing with brushes.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls

PPTOff-Normal and Emergency Response


DOC Spills and Contamination Events
KEEP
3.3.13.20 Identify the protective clothing requirements for area decontamination. (plant specific)
3.3.13.21 Explain why area decontamination should begin at areas of lowest contamination levels and progress toward areas of high levels.PPTContamination Control, Decontamination, Respiratory Protection

PPTRadiological Controls
KEEP
3.3.13.22 Discuss plant requirements for conducting and documenting post-decontamination surveys. (plant specific)
3.3.13.23 Identify special precautions associated with disposal of materials used in decontamination, such as wet mop heads, liquids that contain detergents, vacuum cleaner dust, and mixed waste.DOC Spills and Contamination Events
KEEP
3.3.13.24 Describe plant radiological protection requirements for decontaminating used protective clothing. (plant specific)
3.3.13.25 Describe plant radiological protection requirements for decontaminating used respiratory protective devices. (plant specific)
3.3.14 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL CONTROL Explain and apply concepts related to radioactive material control.
3.3.14.1 Identify the packaging, marking, and labeling requirements for radioactive materials stored on site. (plant specific)
3.3.14.2 Identify NRC-licensed radioactive materials that require special controls, and discuss the controls required.DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability

PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

3.3.14.3 Describe the approval and posting requirements for radioactive material areas and radioactive material storage areas.DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability

PPTRadiation Protection Postings


PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.14.4 Describe plant procedures for storing and retrieving radioactive materials. (plant specific)
3.3.14.5 Identify special precautions and restrictions for storing radioactive materials outdoors.DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability
KEEP
3.3.14.6 Discuss plant procedures for preventing the loss of radioactive materials. (plant specific)
3.3.14.7 Describe the controls over radioactive effluent releases, including the following:
3.3.14.7.1 normal liquid and gaseous radioactivity release pathsPPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPT Gaseous Radwaste

3.3.14.7.2 radiation monitors used to detect and measure releasesPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability
3.3.14.7.3 procedural controls and records associated with releasesPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills


DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability
3.3.14.7.4 off-site dose calculations for releasesPPTAir Sampling

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
3.3.14.7.5 use of derived air concentration and technical specification limitsPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills
PPTAir Sampling

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCAirborne Radioactivity Surveys
3.3.14.7.6 notifications and actions required for abnormal releasesPPTPersonnel Monitoring
3.3.14.7.7 radiological environmental technical specificationsPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program
3.3.14.7.8 off-site dose calculation limits and requirements (plant specific)DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability
KEEP
3.3.14.8 Identify regulations and procedures for shipping and receiving radioactive materials.
3.3.14.9 Define the following terms related to shipping radioactive materials: (49CFR172+3) type A, type B, low specific activity, radioactive white I, yellow II, and yellow III labels, highway route controlled quantity, limited quantity, exempt quantity, special form, and normal form.PPTRadioactive Material Handling and Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Safety & Response


DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability
3.3.14.10 Discuss regulatory limits for radiation levels and contamination levels for packages and vehicles while in transit. (49CFR172+3)PPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

DOCRadioactive Materials Handling & Accountability
KEEP
3.3.14.11 Describe plant procedures for shipping and receiving radioactive material shipments. (plant specific)
3.3.14.12 Discuss burial site requirements and criteria (plant specific) including those for liquids; oils; class A (stable and unstable), class B and class C wastes; not generally acceptable; and high-integrity containers. (Plant specific)
3.3.14.13 Describe on-site radioactive waste storage capabilities. (plant specific)
3.3.14.14 Describe local radioactive waste disposal compact, applicable states, siting location schedule and approximate cost for disposal. (plant specific)
3.3.14.15 Describe plant systems for storing and processing radioactive liquid waste, and the (Plant specific) location of storage tanks, filters, demineralizers, evaporators, and solidification equipment.
3.3.14.16 Explain the radiological protection requirements associated with processing liquid wastes using techniques such as operation of evaporators, solidification of evaporate bottoms, transfer of demineralizer resin to shipping casks, and dewatering and solidification of resins.PPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTChemistry and Radcon


PPTRadiological Safety & Response
KEEP
3.3.14.17 Describe the plant procedure for sorting solid waste to remove materials (plant specific) such as noncontaminated waste, reusable materials (tools, protective clothing, respirators), liquids, and prohibited materials. (Plant specific)
3.3.14.18 Describe the radiological protection requirements associated with sorting and segregating radioactive waste. (plant specific)
3.3.14.19 Describe radiological protection requirements for operating a radioactive waste compactor.PPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills
KEEP
3.3.14.20 Identify and explain techniques for reducing the volume of radioactive solid waste generated, such as the following:
3.3.14.20.1 minimizing the amount of material entering the radiologically restricted areaPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.14.20.2 decontaminationPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.14.20.3 segregating non-radioactive wastePPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills


PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.14.20.4 reusing cloth rags, shoe covers, bags, protective clothingPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills

PPTRadiological Safety & Response

PPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.14.20.5 wrapping clean equipment to prevent its contaminationPPTProtection Against Radiation
3.3.14.20.6 compactionPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills
3.3.14.20.7 using a hot tool roomPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills
3.3.14.20.8 removing packing materials outside the radiologically restricted areaPPTRadioactive Material Handling & Interpersonal Skills
keep
3.3.14.21 Describe the flow path for off-site waste processing and burial. (plant specific)
3.3.15 ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING eExplain the purpose, process, and specifics of environmental monitoring.
3.3.15.1 Explain the purpose of the plant environmental monitoring program.PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

DOCEnvironmental Sample Counting Using Proportional Counters
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
3.3.15.2 Describe the methods used to conduct environmental monitoring, such as posting themoluminescent dosimeters off-site and sampling air, vegetation, aquatic life, water, soil, and milk.PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

PPTContamination Control

DOCContamination Control_Lesson Plan

DOCEnvironmental Sample Counting Using Proportional Counters
Daniel A. Gollnick, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 6th edition, ISBN: 0-916339-11-4, Pacific Radiation Corporation, Chapter 12, "Surveys, Calibrations, and Data Analysis"  
KEEP
3.3.15.3 Describe the limits and action levels associated with environmental monitoring. (plant specific)
3.3.15.4 Describe actions to be taken if unexpected radioactivity is detected in environmental samples. (plant specific)
3.3.15.5 Identify the major pathways of concern in performing off-site dose calculations.PPTRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program

DOCRadiological Environmental Monitoring Program
KEEP
3.3.15.6 Describe periodic reporting requirements for environmental monitoring data. (plant specific)
3.3.16 SPECIALIZED SKILLS: PLANT SPECIFIC Perform specialized skills as identified by the plant.
3.3.16.1 Perform calibrations of radiation detection and sampling equipment
3.3.16.2 Operate the whole-body counter and interpret the results
3.3.16.3 Read and interpret whole-body dosimetry results
3.3.16.4 Operate counting room equipment such as multichannel analyzers and automatic smear counters
3.3.16.5 Test respirator fit and clean respirator
3.3.16.6 Test respirator filter cartridge
4.0 DISCIPLINE SPECIFIC CURRICULUM FOR CHEMISTRY TECHNICIANS
4.1 COMPUTERS (PLANT SPECIFIC) Explain the basic operation and application of computers